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Mozilla News and Progress

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  • Zero coverage report

    Using these reports, we have managed to remove a good amount of code from mozilla-central, so far around 60 files with thousands of lines of code. We are confident that there’s even more code that we could remove or conditionally compile only if needed.

    As any modern software, Firefox relies a lot on third party libraries. Currently, most (all?) the content of these libraries is built by default. For example,~400 files are untested in the gfx/skia/ directory).

  • Shipping a security update of Firefox in less than a day

    One of Mozilla’s top priorities is to keep our users safe; this commitment is written into our mission. As soon as we discover a critical issue in Firefox, we plan a rapid mitigation. This post will describe how we fixed a Pwn2Own exploit discovery in less than 22 hours, through the collaborative and well-coordinated efforts of a global cross-functional team of release and QA engineers, security experts, and other stakeholders.

    Pwn2Own is an annual computer hacking contest. The goal of this event is to find security vulnerabilities in major software such as browsers. Last week, this event took place in Vancouver. Without getting into technical details of the exploit here, this blog post will describe how Mozilla responded quickly to ship updated builds of Firefox once an exploit was found during Pwn2Own.

  • Firefox Performance Update #4
  • The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies (Startklar?! March 2018)

    I presented today in Berlin at the Goethe Institute’s Startklar?! event. I went after a keynote (in German) by Cathleen Berger, Mozilla’s Global Engagement Lead. My time at Mozilla didn’t overlap with hers, but the subjects covered in our presentations certainly did!

    It was good to see Cathleen reference the Web Literacy Map, work that I led from 2012 to 2015 at Mozilla. She also referenced the recent Cambridge Analytica revelations and the DQ Institute.

  • Mozilla Accepting Applications for Internet Fellowships, Node.js Now Available as a Snap, Krita 4.0.0 Released and More

    Mozilla is accepting applications for its 2018–2019 Internet Fellowships: "Mozilla Fellows are technologists, activists, and policy experts building a more humane digital world." Apply here. Applications are due April 20, 2018 at 5pm EDT.

Browsers: Mozilla and Chrome

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  • Mozilla Presses Pause on Facebook Advertising

    Mozilla is pressing pause on our Facebook advertising. Facebook knows a great deal about their two billion users — perhaps more intimate information than any other company does. They know everything we click and like on their site, and know who our closest friends and relationships are. Because of its scale, Facebook has become one of the most convenient platforms to reach an audience for all companies and developers, whether a multibillion corporation or a not-for-profit.

  • Results of the MDN “Duplicate Pages” SEO experiment

    Following in the footsteps of MDN’s “Thin Pages” SEO experiment done in the autumn of 2017, we completed a study to test the effectiveness and process behind making changes to correct cases in which pages are perceived as “duplicates” by search engines. In SEO parlance, “duplicate” is a fuzzy thing. It doesn’t mean the pages are identical—this is actually pretty rare on MDN in particular—but that the pages are similar enough that they are not easily differentiated by the search engine’s crawling technology.

  • Send, getting better

    Send continues to improve incrementally. Since our last post we’ve added a few requested features and fixed a bunch of bugs. You can now choose to allow multiple downloads and change the password on a file if you need to.

    Send is also more stable and should work more reliably across a wider set of browsers. We’ve brought back support for Microsoft Edge and some older versions of Safari.

  • Chrome 66 Beta: CSS Typed Object Model, Async Clipboard API, AudioWorklet

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 66 on ChromeStatus.

  • Chrome 66 Beta Delivers On Async Clipboard API, Web Locks API

    Following the Chrome 65 release earlier this month, Google developers have now catapulted the Chrome 66 beta.

Mozilla: Privacy Violations, Privacy Rants, Development and More

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  • Mozilla's opt-out Firefox DNS privacy test sparks, er, privacy outcry

    Mozilla's plan to test a more secure method for resolving internet domain names – known as Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) via DNS over HTTPs (DoH) – in Firefox Nightly builds has met with objections from its user community due to privacy concerns.

    The browser maker's intentions appear to be beneficial for Firefox users. As Patrick McManus, one of the Mozilla software engineers conducting the test, explains in a note posted this week to one of the company's developer forums, DoH can make DNS communication more secure.

  • Mozilla Statement, Petition: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica

    The headlines speak for themselves: Up to 50 million Facebook users had their information used by Cambridge Analytica, a private company, without their knowledge or consent. That’s not okay.

  • Enough is enough. Let’s tell Facebook what we want fixed.

    I had one big loud thought pounding in my head as I read the Cambridge Analytica headlines this past weekend: it’s time for Facebook users to say ‘enough is enough‘.

  • Crash-Stop, an extension to help handle crashes on Bugzilla

    Crash-stop is a webextension I wrote for Bugzilla to display crash stats by builds and patch information.

    The goal is to have enough information to be able to decide if a patch helped (hence its name) and, if needed, uplift it to the Beta/ESR/Release trains as appropriate.

    This project was initially meant to assist release-managers but it’s been useful for developers who fix/monitor crashes or for folks doing bug triage.

  • New features in Notes v3

    Today we are updating TestPilot Notes to v3.1! We have several new user-facing features and behind the scenes changes in this v3 release. The focus of this release was discoverability, speed and a bit of codebase cleanup.

    We heard your feedback about “Exporting notes…” and with this release we have added the first export related feature. You can now export the notepad as HTML using the menu. We are still playing around with Markdown and other exporting features.

  • compare-locales 3.0 – GSOC

    There’s something magic about compare-locales 3.0. It comes with Python 3 support.

    It took me quite a while to get to it, but the writing is on the wall that I had to add support for Python 3. That’s just been out for 10 years, too. Well, more like 9ish.

    We’re testing against Python 2.7, 3.5, and 3.6 now.

  • Multilingual Gecko Status Update 2018.1

    As promised in my previous post, I’d like to do a better job at delivering status updates on Internationalization and Localization technologies at Gecko at shorter intervals than once per year.

    In the previous post we covered recent history up to Firefox 58 which got released in January 2018. Since then we finished and shipped Firefox 59 and also finished all major work on Firefox 60, so this post will cover the two.

  • Bringing interactive examples to MDN
  • March Add(on)ness: Ghostery (2) Vs Decentraleyes (3)

Mozilla News/Views

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  • What we learned about gender identity in Open Source

    To learn more, we launched a Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source survey earlier this year, which sought to better understand how people identify, including gender-identity.

    Our gender spectrum question, was purposely long — to experiment with the value people found in seeing their identity represented in a question. People from over 200 open projects participated. Amazingly, of 17 choices, each was uniquely selected, by a survey participant at least once.

  • Why we participate in support

    Users will not use Firefox if they don’t know how to use it, or if it is not working as expected. Support exists to retain users. If their experience of using Firefox is a bad, we’re here to make it good, so they continue to use Firefox.

  • WebRender newsletter #16
  • A good question, from Twitter

    Why do I pay attention to Internet advertising? Why not just block it and forget about it? By now, web ad revenue per user is so small that it only makes sense if you're running a platform with billions of users, so sites are busy figuring out other ways to get paid anyway.

  • This Week In Servo 108

    We have been working on adding automated performance tests for the Alexa top pages, and thanks to contributions from the Servo community we are now regularly tracking the performance of the top 10 websites.

Mozilla: Mozilla Firefox 60 Plans, Firefox 59 Release and More

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  • Mozilla Firefox 60 Promises Enhanced Camera Privacy and USB Token Authentication

    While most Internet users are enjoying their brand-new Firefox 59 web browser with all of its performance improvements and new privacy features, Mozilla works hard on the next major release, Firefox 60.

  • Firefox Quantum for Enterprise Brings Control to Browser Deployments

    Mozilla is aiming to increase its browser market share with a new effort that will better enable managed deployments of the Firefox browser in enterprise environments.

    The new Firefox Quantum for Enterprise technology is part of the Firefox 60 release which reached the beta milestone on March 14 and is set to become generally available on May 9. The Firefox 60 Beta release comes a day after the Firefox 59 browser was released, providing incremental feature updates and security fixes.

  • Firefox 59 Released: Faster Page Loading, Better Graphics For macOS, New Screenshot Features
  • March Add(on)ness: Tree Style Tab (1) Vs Don’t Touch My Tabs (4)
  • Enter the Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge

    Firefox users love using extensions to personalize their browsing experience. Now, it’s easier than ever for developers with working knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, and CSS to create extensions for Firefox using the WebExtensions API. New and improved WebExtensions APIs land with each new Firefox release, giving developers the freedom to create new features and fine-tune their extensions.

  • Building Mixed Reality spaces for the web

    One of the primary goals of our Social Mixed Reality team is to enable and accelerate access to Mixed Reality-based communication. As mentioned in our announcement blog post, we feel meeting with others around the world in Mixed Reality should be as easy as sharing a link, and creating a virtual space to spend time in should be as easy as building your first website. In this post, we wanted to share an early look at some work we are doing to help achieve the second goal, making it easy for newcomers to create compelling 3D spaces suited for meeting in Mixed Reality.

Mozilla: New Firefox Snap, Firefox 60 Plans and These Weeks in Firefox

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  • Firefox is now available as a Snap package

    The latest version of Mozilla Firefox is available as a Snap package for Ubuntu and other Linux distros. Not just any ol’d Snap package either, but an official, made-by-Mozilla Snap package. It’s arrival, without any sort of formal fanfare (yet) has been a long time coming.

  • Firefox 60 Is In Beta With Web Authentication & Policy Engine Support

    Other changes in Firefox 60.0 beta include the new Firefox Quantum CSS engine being used to render the browser's user-interface, enhanced camera privacy indicators, support for promises with IndexedDB transactions, and more.

    There doesn't appear to be anything new with regards to Wayland support in Firefox 60 Beta.

    Firefox 60.0 should be officially released in early May.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 34

Mozilla Development/News

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  • Making WebAssembly better for Rust & for all languages

    One big 2018 goal for the Rust community is to become a web language. By targeting WebAssembly, Rust can run on the web just like JavaScript. But what does this mean? Does it mean that Rust is trying to replace JavaScript?

    The answer to that question is no. We don’t expect Rust WebAssembly apps to be written completely in Rust. In fact, we expect the bulk of application code will still be JS, even in most Rust WebAssembly applications.

    This is because JS is a good choice for most things. It’s quick and easy to get up and running with JavaScript. On top of that, there’s a vibrant ecosystem full of JavaScript developers who have created incredibly innovative approaches to different problems on the web.

  • March Add(on)ness: Video Download Helper (1) Vs Cookie AD (4)

    Video DownloadHelper is the easy way to download and convert Web videos from hundreds of YouTube-like sites.

    Video DownloadHelper is a strong contender, giving users the ability to snag videos from virtually any site. The add-on automatically finds videos on a webpage. What users do with those videos is nobody’s business and anyone’s guess.

    Fun Fact: 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and almost 5 billion videos are watched on Youtube every single day. If you tried to download all of them, your computer would explode.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 225
  • The new Firefox lets you stop websites from asking to send you notifications

    The Mozilla Foundation released a new version of Firefox this week—release number 59. It treads further down the performance improvement path that November's Quantum release began, but its most interesting feature is a quality-of-life one: Firefox 59 users can prevent some websites from popping up requests to send notifications to your device or from requesting to use your camera unexpectedly.

  • Things Gateway, Part 7 - IKEA TRÅDFRI

    In this series of postings, I've been setting up, configuring, and playing with IoT devices through the experimental Things Gateway from Mozilla. I've covered the generic Zigbee and Z-Wave devices, the Philips Hue devices, and the TP-Link WiFi devices. Today, I add IKEA TRÅDFRI to this circus.

    Of course, in this series, I've also been doing a bit of editorializing. I was critical of the TP-Link devices because their security model requires the end user to just trust them. I'm critical of the IKEA TRÅDFRI for a physical safety reason. What does the word TRÅDFRI mean? I'm assuming it is a Swedish word that means "severe blood loss from slashed wrists" because that is what is likely to happen when opening the package. The clamshell plastic that entombs their products is difficult to open with anything short of a chainsaw. My kitchen scissors wouldn't do the job and I had to resort to garden pruning shears and that left dangerously sharp pieces that drew blood. Be careful.

  • Firefox Performance Update #3

    Hi! I’ve got another slew of Firefox performance work to report today.

    Special thanks to the folks who submitted things through this form to let me know about performance work that’s taken place recently! If you’ve seen something fixed lately that’ll likely have a positive impact on Firefox performance, let me know about it!

Mozilla Leftovers: New Release of Firefox and Lots More

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  • Latest Firefox available to users where they browse the web — laptop, Fire TV and the office. Plus, a chance to help with the next Firefox release!
  • Firefox 59 “Quantum” released

    Mozilla has released its Firefox 59.0 “Quantum” browser.

    The browser supports GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows desktop operating systems, and iOS and Android mobile devices.

  • Firefox 59 released, these are the key changes
  • Mozilla's Firefox 59 Released, New Agones Project, SparkyLinux 5.3 Available, Hunt for Exoplanets and More

    Mozilla's Firefox 59 is available for download. See the wiki for more information on its new features, including the "option to stop websites from asking to send notifications or access your device's camera, microphone, and location".

  • IT Pros and CIOs: sign up to try Firefox Quantum for Enterprise
  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla files response to European Commission ‘Fake news and online disinformation’ public consultation
  • Can Chrome Sync or Firefox Sync be trusted with sensitive data?
  • Mozilla Foundation is seeking a VP, Leadership Programs

    One of Mozilla’s biggest strengths is the people — a global community of engineers, designers, educators, lawyers, scientists, researchers, artists, activists and every day users brought together with the common goal of making the internet healthier.

    A big part of Mozilla Foundation’s focus over the past few years has been increasing both the size and diversity of this community and the broader moveme. In particular, we’ve run a series of initiatives — the Internet Health Report, MozFest, our fellowships and awards — aimed at connecting and supporting people who want to take a leadership role in this community. Our global community is the lynchpin in our strategy to grow a global movement to create a healthier digital world.

  • Side projects and swag-driven development

    Another option I keep hearing is to push Mozilla leadership into making side-projects real. That seems like a good option and I think it happens periodically. I sort of did this with Bleach. I spent tons of time trying to get Bleach turned into a real project and it sort of is now.

    Based on that experience, I think it requires a bunch of people and meetings to come to a consensus on validating the project's existence which is a lot of work and takes a lot of time. It's important that projects paid for by budgets have impact and value and all that--I get that--but the work to get a side-project to that point is unpleasant and time-consuming. I bet many side-projects can't pass muster to become a real project. I think what happens instead is that side-projects continue to exist in the misty "there be dragons" part of the Mozilla universe map until the relevant people leave and stuff breaks.

    There are probably other options.

    I've been wondering about an option where where the maintainers aren't locked into choosing between walking away and guilt-driven development for a project that's important, but for some reason doesn't have a critical mass and doesn't pass muster enough to turn into a real project.

    I started wondering if my problem with Standups is two fold: first, I have no incentive to work on it other than bad feelings, and second, it's a free service so no one else has incentive to work on it either.

    One incentive is getting paid in money, but that's messy, problematic, and hard to do. But what if we used a different currency? There's a lot of swag at Mozilla. What if we could use swag to drive development?

  • So, How’s Screenshots Doing?

    It’s been a bit over five months since we launched Firefox Screenshots in Firefox 56, and I wanted to take a moment to reflect on what’s happened so far and to look forward to what’s coming next.

    So far, our users have taken more than 67 million screenshots. This is a big number that makes my manager happy, but more interesting is how we got here.

  • March Add(on)ness is here

    Winter’s icy hand is releasing its grip, birds are returning from southern migration which means it’s that time of year where people everywhere rank things, put them in brackets and have them compete for bragging rights over who’s the best. It’s time for March Add(on)ness!

  • A Truly Responsive WebXR Experiment: A-Painter XR

    In our posts announcing our Mixed Reality program last year, we talked about some of the reasons we were excited to expand WebVR to include AR technology. In the post about our experimental WebXR Polyfill and WebXR Viewer, we mentioned that the WebVR Community Group has shifted to become the Immersive Web Community Group and the WebVR API proposal is becoming the WebXR Device API proposal. As the community works through the details of these these changes, this is a great time to step back and think about the requirements and implications of mixing AR and VR in one API.

Firefox 59 Prepped For Release: Nukes GTK2 Code, Still Prepping For Wayland

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Mozilla's Firefox 59.0 is now available to download from the FTP server ahead of the official announcement.

Firefox 59.0 can now be downloaded for all supported platforms. Firefox 59.0 does deliver on dropping GTK2 support in favor of the GTK3 tool-kit support that's now mature.

But what didn't make it for Firefox 59.0 is the Firefox 59 Wayland support that remains a work-in-progress and was diverted from being a target for mozilla59. While the Wayland support isn't yet squared away, there have been bug fixes and other improvements in working towards getting this native Wayland support ready by default for those not building your web-browser with the --enable-default-toolkit=cairo-gtk3-wayland switch.

Read more

Original: Version 59.0, first offered to Release channel users on March 13, 2018

Mozilla Firefox 59 Released with Faster Page Load Times, New Privacy Features

Mozilla: Rust's 2018 Roadmap, This Week In Servo 107, TenFourFox FPR6 available

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  • Rust Gets A 2018 Roadmap, Big "Productivity" Edition Planned This Year

    The developers behind the Rust programming language have put out a road-map for the year as well as details on the forthcoming "Rust 2018" Edition that succeeds the 1.x release series.

  • Rust's 2018 roadmap

    Each year the Rust community comes together to set out a roadmap. This year, in addition to the survey, we put out a call for blog posts in December, which resulted in 100 blog posts written over the span of a few weeks. The end result is the recently-merged 2018 roadmap RFC.

  • This Week In Servo 107

    In the last week, we merged 85 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    Congratulations to waywardmonkeys for their new mandate to review and maintain the low-level harfbuzz bindings, and their work to create safe higher-level bindings!

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR6 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 6 is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). Other than finishing the security patches and adding a couple more entries to the basic adblock, there are no other changes in this release. Assuming no issues, it will become live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

    The backend for the main download page at Floodgap has been altered such that the Downloader is now only offered to browsers that do not support TLS 1.2 (this is detected by checking for a particular JavaScript math function Math.hypot, the presence of which I discovered roughly correlates with TLS 1.2 support in Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Safari and Firefox/TenFourFox). This is to save bandwidth on our main server since those browsers are perfectly capable of downloading directly from SourceForge and don't need the Downloader to help them. This is also true of Leopard WebKit, assuming the Security framework update is also installed.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Openwashing,, OCP, Kernel Commits Statistics

  • More Tips for Managing a Fast-Growing Open Source Project [Ed: Microsoft has infiltrated the Linux Foundation so deeply and severely that the Foundation now regularly issues openwashing pieces for the company that attacks Linux]
  • improves Kubernetes networking in sixth software release, one of Linux Foundation’s open source projects, has introduced its 18.01 software release with a focus on improving Kubernetes Networking, Istio and cloud native NFV.
  • Bolsters Kubernetes, NFV, and Istio Support With Latest Release
    The Fast Data Project ( released its sixth update since its inception within the Linux Foundation two years ago. While the update list is extensive, most are focused on Kubernetes networking, cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), and Istio.
  • Linux Foundation, OCP collaborate on open sourcing hardware and software
    The virtualization of network functions has resulted in a disaggregation of hardware and software, increasing interest in open source projects for both layers in return. To feed this interest, the Linux Foundation and Open Compute Project (OCP) recently announced a joint initiative to advance the development of software and hardware-based open source networking. Both organizations have something to offer the other through the collaboration. The Linux Foundation’s OPNFV project integrates OCP as well as other open source software projects into relevant network functions virtualization (NFV) reference architectures. At the same time, OCP offers an open source option for the hardware layer.
  • Kernel Commits with "Fixes" tag
    Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of kernel bug fix commits that use the "Fixes" tag.  Kernel developers use this annotation on a commit to reference an older commit that originally introduced the bug, which is obviously very useful for bug tracking purposes. What is interesting is that there has been a steady take-up of developers using this annotation:

today's howtos

Positive Red Hat Results Expected Next Week

Fedora: Fedora 28 Beta Delay, Mindshare Monthly Report and More

  • Fedora 28 release dates and schedule
    With the release of Fedora 27, the Fedora 28 release schedule is falling into place. As of now, the current Fedora 28 release schedule is as follows.
  • Fedora 28 Beta Has Been Delayed
    It's time for the Fedora 28 release dance and to place your bets if F28 will be released on time or is another Fedora release challenged by release delays. Fedora 28 Beta had been due for release next week but has now been set by its first delay. Fortunately, a buffer was already built into the release schedule so for now is not impacting the final release of Fedora 28 due out in May.
  • Fedora 28 Beta status is NO-GO
    Release status of the Fedora 28 Beta is NO-GO. Due to missing RC for the F28 Beta release and presence of blocker bugs, the decision is “No Go”. The Beta release slips for one week to “Target #1” date (April 3rd). We are not going to slip the Final GA yet.
  • Mindshare Monthly Report – FAD and First Actions
  • Digitizing VHS with Fedora
    I have a dozen or so movies on VHS that we still watch. To be honest, I'm not that concerned about the commercial movies; those are easy enough to replace. But what about our home movies? My high school cross country team videos and my wife's marching band videos, among others—you won't find those on Netflix anytime soon. So I decided it was time to get serious about something I'd been meaning to do for a long time: Digitize my VHS tapes. In this article, I'll describe how I set up my Fedora desktop to convert my VHS tapes into 1s and 0s. Previously, Don Watkins described a different setup for VHS conversion.
  • Fedora 27 : The LibreOffice the 6.0.2 and versions.