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Moz/FF

Mozilla rebrand

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Moz/FF

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Vimperator interface for Firefox Part 1

    Vimperator is a plugin for Firefox that completely overhauls the GUI to behave like Vim making your mouse unneeded for most web sites. If this was not available I would be attempting to create something much like it.

  • Contextual Identities on the Web

    We all portray different characteristics of ourselves in different situations. The way I speak with my son is much different than the way I communicate with my coworkers. The things I tell my friends are different than what I tell my parents. I’m much more guarded when withdrawing money from the bank than I am when shopping at the grocery store. I have the ability to use multiple identities in multiple contexts. But when I use the web, I can’t do that very well. There is no easy way to segregate my identities such that my browsing behavior while shopping for toddler clothes doesn’t cross over to my browsing behavior while working. The Containers feature I’m about to describe attempts to solve this problem: empowering Firefox to help segregate my online identities in the same way I can segregate my real life identities.

  • Multi-process Firefox and AMO

    In Firefox 48, which reaches the release channel on August 1, 2016, mullti-process support (code name “Electrolysis”, or “e10s”) will begin rolling out to Firefox users without any add-ons installed.

  • Fix Firefox resource URI leak

    Any website can access a selection of Firefox resource files to find out more about the web browser that is used to connect to the site.

  • Baby Steps: Slowly Porting musl to Rust

    TLDR: I’m toying with writing a C standard library in Rust by porting musl-libc over function-by-function.

Bringing Mozilla to the IoT era

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Interviews
Moz/FF

Rabimba has been involved in open source since the summer of 2014, when he was connected to Mozilla for the first time through the company's investments into Firefox OS in India. In this interview, I ask him how he got involved in open source, what he's currently working on, and how get got involved in contributing to Mozilla.

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Making The Case For Using Rust At Low Levels On Linux Systems

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Development
Moz/FF

Linux kernel developer Andy Grover who is employed by Red Hat has written a lengthy blog post making the case for using the Rust programming language for low-level Linux.

Grover believes Rust is "extremely well-suited for low level Linux systems user-space programming." Grover believes that for work on new low-level utilities they would be better off written in Rust than the C programming language.

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Also:

  • PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 1 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 1. This release marks the beginning of the first minor release in the PHP 7.x series. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • PHP 7.1 Alpha Released With Void Return Type, Multi Catch

    The first alpha release was made available on Thursday for the upcoming PHP 7.1.

    PHP 7.1 is baking many features including the void return type, nullable types, generalized support of negative string offsets, class constant visibility modifiers, multi-catch, and more.

Mozilla contributes to FOSS security

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Moz/FF
Security

Mozilla Firefox News

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Moz/FF

Mozilla launches Secure Open Source (SOS) Fund

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Moz/FF
OSS

Open source software is ideal for security. Its transparency allows code to be publicly reviewed and audited. This not only helps to detect bugs and vulnerabilities, but intentional backdoors too. In contrast, closed source software can be a mystery to users -- who knows what is lurking in your favorite such programs?

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Firefox 47 and Firefox 48

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Moz/FF

Mozilla turns Firefox OS into IoT hub

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OS
Moz/FF

As an operating system, Firefox OS has undergone a massive transformation in the past 24 months – it’s far more than just a web browser nowadays. But now Mozilla is looking to take Firefox to the next level by using it as a hub for a plethora of Internet of Things projects.

Mozilla is currently working on four IoT projects behind the scenes: Project Smart Home, Project Link, Project Sensor Web and Vaani. Each of the projects will deal with IoT technology in different ways, but all are aimed at making the end consumer’s home and devices smarter. In a blog post, Mozilla’s SVP of Connected Devices, Ari Jaaksi, posted: “Everything is connected around us. This revolution has already started and it will be bigger than previous technology revolutions, including the mobile smartphone revolution. Internet of Things, as many call it today, will fundamentally affect all of us.”

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More in Tux Machines

Internet of Things Web Editor Open Source Project Started

The StackSavings Web Editor has recently been launched as an open source project. The aim of the project is to be a Web Editor for the Internet of Things. The IoT web editor is built on Amazon Web Services cloud platform and is working toward the goal of providing an easy to use web editor interface. Read more

GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

The GNOME 3.21.4 desktop environment was released last week, which means that many of the default applications and components were updated with bug fixes and various enhancements. Read more

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series. Read more

Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs
    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.