Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 44.0 to Enable H.264 on Linux if FFmpeg Is Available, Still no GTK3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Now that the Mozilla Firefox 43.0 has safely landed on our computers, the time has come to take a look at some of the upcoming features of the next major release of the popular web browser, Mozilla Firefox 44.0.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Users Can Now Watch Netflix HTML5 Video on Windows

    Netflix announced today that their HTML5 video player now supports Firefox on Windows Vista and later using Adobe’s new Primetime CDM (Content Decryption Module). This means Netflix fans can watch their favorite shows on Firefox without installing NPAPI plugins.

  • Compiling to WebAssembly: It’s Happening!

    WebAssembly is a new binary format for compilation to the web. It is in the process of being designed and implemented as we speak, in collaboration among the major browser vendors. Things are moving quickly! In this post we’ll show some of our recent progress with a deep dive into the toolchain side of WebAssembly.

  • Work Continues On WebAssembly For Low-Level, In-Browser Computing

    Work continues on the WebAssembly project that's the joint effort by Mozilla, Google, Microsoft, and Apple to allow C/C++ (and potentially other languages) to target a virtual ISA that would be executed within the web-browser.

    WebAssembly is a virtual ISA designed around allowing portable code, compatibility across different browsers, a small download footprint, and other traits for effective client-side browser scripting. Much of WebAssembly's development continues to happen on its LLVM back-end.

  • Mozilla rolls out Firefox version 43 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 43.0 Officially Released for GNU/Linux Without GTK3 Support

Filed under
Moz/FF

We reported the other day that Mozilla started seeding the final build of its latest stable Firefox 43.0 web browser for all supported operating system, including GNU/Linux, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X.

Read more

Also: Firefox 43 Now Officially Available, But GTK3 Gets Disabled

Norway county shares emergency response system

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Norway’s Akerhus county is sharing its early warning and crises management system. The solution is published using the Mozilla open source licence. The system is in operation in two schools, and will be implemented by other schools in Akerhus in the coming months.

Read more

Mozilla Firefox 43.0 Is Now Available for Download for Linux, Mac, and Windows

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Mozilla Firefox 43.0 web browser is scheduled for an official release on December 15, 2015, but Mozilla has just started seeding the binaries for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • So Long, Firefox OS Phones, and Thanks for All the Fun

    Yesterday news came with a blow: Mozilla announced that, despite development of Firefox OS will continue, they decided to stop their three year experiment with the OS on phones.

    For many, this was equal to saying that Firefox OS is dead.

    Some people were surprised because this decision came when Firefox OS phones were starting to get some traction in developing markets.

  • RIP Firefox OS phones, we hardly knew ye

    Mozilla has ceased development and sales of its open source, Linux-based Firefox OS mobile distribution, although the code may infuse future IoT projects.

    At Mozilla’s “Mozlando” developer conference yesterday, the company announced the end of its ambitious Firefox OS project for low-cost, web-oriented phones. TechCrunch ran a quote from Ari Jaaksi, Mozilla’s SVP of Connected Devices, saying in part: “We weren’t able to offer the best user experience possible and so we will stop offering Firefox OS smartphones through carrier channels.” Jaaksi also said Mozilla “will continue to experiment with the user experience across connected devices,” and that “we’ll share more on our work and new experiments across connected devices soon.”

  • Mozilla Distributes Funds To Open Source
  • Mozilla Dishes Out Money to Projects It Rellies On

    A month ago, Mozilla announced MOSS, the Mozilla Open Source Support project, during which it planned to give away $1 million / €0.91 million to open source projects it relied on.

  • Mozilla's content blocker, new JavaScript engine, and more open source news

    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, Mozilla announces new content blocker and ends Firefox OS, the Edge browser's JavaScript engine source released, and more.

  • Mozilla's Servo Can Now Run On Wayland's Weston Compositor

    Mozilla's experimental Servo engine has been ported to run on Wayland's Weston.

  • Announcing Rust 1.5

    The biggest news with Rust 1.5 is the introduction of cargo install, a new subcommand that installs Cargo application packages on the local system. This tool offers a painless way to distribute Rust applications.

Mozilla Gives Up Firefox Phone Ambitions

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox phone's main strength might well have been its Achilles' heel. That could revisit any new uses for the Firefox OS.

"It was independent of Google, potentially more secure, but it had no apps and no significant demand," Enderle said.

Read more

Firefox OS Pivot to Connected Devices

Filed under
Moz/FF

Everything is connected around us. This revolution has already started and it will be bigger than previous technology revolutions, including the mobile smartphone revolution. Internet of Things, as many call it today, will fundamentally affect all of us.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more