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Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 50.0 Web Browser Lands in All Supported Ubuntu OSes, Update Now

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Moz/FF

Three days after we reported on the official availability of the Mozilla Firefox 50.0 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, it looks like users of the Ubuntu Linux OS can now install the application.

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Also: Mozilla Thunderbird 45.5.0 Supports Changes to Character Limit in Twitter

Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Promises WebGL 2 Support, Less CPU Usage, and FLAC Playback

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Moz/FF

While Firefox's 50 milestone failed to introduce any major features to the open-source, free and cross-platform web browser used by millions of people worldwide, it looks like Mozilla has some big plans for the next major release.

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Mozilla News

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Web Browsers

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Moz/FF

Firefox 50.0 Officially Released for Linux, Mac and Windows, Here's What's New

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Moz/FF

Today, November 15, 2016, Mozilla unveiled the final release of the Firefox 50.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

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Mozilla Firefox 50.0 Now Available for Download, Brings Built-in Emoji on Linux

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Moz/FF

Just a few moments ago, Mozilla started seeding the binary and source packages of the final release of the Firefox 50.0 web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

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Also: Mozilla Firefox 50 Readied For Release

Mozilla Firefox in 2017

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla plans to rejuvenate Firefox in 2017

    Mozilla last week named its next-generation browser engine project and said it would introduce the new technology to Firefox next year.

    Dubbed Quantum, the new engine will include several components from Servo, the browser rendering engine that Mozilla has sponsored, and been working on, since 2013. Written with Rust, Servo was envisioned as a replacement for Firefox's long-standing Gecko engine. Both Servo and Rust originated at Mozilla's research group.

  • Firefox's New Quantum Build Promises to Kickstart the Browser

    Back in August, Mozilla delivered a number of updates for its Firefox browser that created a bit of fanfare, but the browser has steadily lost market share to Google Chrome. Still, if you've been a fan of open source for any length of time, you are familiar with Firefox's status as a pioneering browser.

    Now, Mozilla has announced plans to kickstart Firefox innovation with a next-generation browse project called Quantum. Here are details.

  • Mozilla News

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    Moz/FF
    • A Quantum Leap for the Web

      Over the past year, our top priority for Firefox was the Electrolysis project to deliver a multi-process browsing experience to users. Running Firefox in multiple processes greatly improves security and performance. This is the largest change we’ve ever made to Firefox, and we’ll be rolling out the first stage of Electrolysis to 100% of Firefox desktop users over the next few months.

      But, that doesn’t mean we’re all out of ideas in terms of how to improve performance and security. In fact, Electrolysis has just set us up to do something we think will be really big.

    • Mozilla Quantum: New Browser Engine Based On Servo/Rust For Firefox

      Mozilla's latest secret project to go public is Quantum, a new browser engine for Firefox. But before wondering what happened to Servo, don't worry, Quantum makes use of Servo and Rust.

    • Porting a few C functions to Rust

      Last time I showed you my beginnings of porting parts of Librsvg to Rust. In this post I'll do an annotated porting of a few functions.

      Disclaimers: I'm learning Rust as I go. I don't know all the borrowing/lending rules; "Rust means never having to close a socket" is a very enlightening article, although it doesn't tell the whole story. I don't know Rust idioms that would make my code prettier. I am trying to refactor things to be prettier after a the initial pass of C-to-Rust. If you know an idiom that would be useful, please mail me!

    Mozilla News

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    Moz/FF
    • Our Role in Protecting the Internet — With Your Help

      Protecting the security of the Internet requires everyone. We talked about this theme in a recent post, and in this post we’ll expand on the role Mozilla plays, and how our work supports and relies on the work of the other participants in the Web.

    • Mozilla Hosts Seventh Annual MozFest in London this weekend

      Now in its seventh year, MozFest is the world’s go-to event for the free and open Internet movement. Part meeting place for like-minded individuals keen to share ideas; part playground for Web enthusiasts, hobbyist netizens and seasoned open source technonauts alike, part hack-a-thon; part living breathing creative brainstorm; part speaker-series; MozFest is a buzzy hive of activity. It attracts thousands of visitors each year (1,800 in 2015) from as many as 50 countries around the world, making it the biggest unconference of its kind.

    An introduction to Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund

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    Interviews
    Moz/FF
    OSS

    Thanks Mark. Mozilla is a unique institution—it's both a nonprofit mission-driven organization and a technology industry corporation. We build open source software (most notably the Firefox Web browser) and we are champions for the open Internet in technical and political fora. We've been a global leader on well-known policy issues like privacy and net neutrality, and we're also very active on most of today's big topics including copyright reform, encryption, and software vulnerabilities.

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    More in Tux Machines

    Announcing Season of KDE 2018

    KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

    How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

    today's leftovers

    'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

    • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
      The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
    • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
      Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.