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Moz/FF

Mozilla Still Maintains Thunderbird but Discontinues Persona

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Moz/FF

Shutting down persona.org in November 2016

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Moz/FF

Hi Everyone,

When the Mozilla Identity team transitioned Persona to community
ownership, we committed resources to operational and security support
throughout 2014 [1], and renewed that commitment for 2015 [2]. Due to
low, declining usage, we are reallocating the project’s dedicated,
ongoing resources and will shut down the persona.org services that we run.

Persona.org and related domains will be taken offline on November 30th,
2016.

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Latest Firefox 43.0.4 Now Available for All Ubuntu OSes

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Canonical has announced that the latest Firefox 43.0.4 version has been made available in the repositories for the users of Ubuntu 15.10, Ubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

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Mozilla Security

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Releases Thunderbird 38.5 with Address Book Improvements, Security Fixes

    Today, January 7, 2016, Mozilla has announced the immediate availability for download of the Mozilla Thunderbird 38.5.0 email, news and chat client for all supported platforms, including Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and GNU/Linux.

  • Mozilla Re-enables SHA-1 Certificate Support in Firefox

    SHA-1 does still matter as Mozilla backtracks on support. However, don't expect the company to support SHA-1 for the long term.

  • Man-in-the-Middle Interfering with Increased Security

    According to the plan we published earlier for deprecating SHA-1, on January 1, 2016, Firefox 43 began rejecting new certificates signed with the SHA-1 digest algorithm. For Firefox users with unfiltered access to the Internet, this change probably went unnoticed, since there simply aren’t that many new SHA-1 certs being used. However, for Firefox users who are behind certain “man-in-the-middle” devices (including some security scanners and antivirus products), this change removed their ability to access HTTPS web sites. When a user tries to connect to an HTTPS site, the man-in-the-middle device sends Firefox a new SHA-1 certificate instead of the server’s real certificate. Since Firefox rejects new SHA-1 certificates, it can’t connect to the server.

Meet Chirimen, a Firefox OS-Powered IoT Single-Board Computer Developed by Mozilla

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Moz/FF

Today we would like to introduce you guys to an upcoming development SBC (Single-board computer) called Chirimen, which is currently developed by Mozilla, the company behind the world's famous Firefox and Thunderbird software products.

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Mozilla Firefox News

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla hastily backpedals on SHA-1 ban after impact larger than thought

    The impact of Mozilla's decision to depreciate SHA-1 at the start of 2016 with the release of Firefox 43 turned out to be larger than it anticipated. As a result, Mozilla hastily released an update on Wednesday that re-enabled support for SHA-1 certificates as it seeks to better evaluate how many users might be affected.

    Firefox 43 was supposed to ratchet up security for its users as part of Mozilla's roadmap by dropping support only for new SHA-1 certificates, while continuing to support older SHA-1. The rationale behind this move was to present a clear disincentive for certificate providers to move away from SHA-1 without penalizing – as yet – existing SHA-1 certificates that are already in use.

  • Firefox’s ban of SHA-1 certs causing some security issues, Mozilla warns

    Mozilla has warned Firefox users that its decision to reject SHA-1 certificates has caused an unfortunate side effect: some man-in-the-middle devices, such as security scanners and antivirus products, are failing to connect to HTTPS sites.

    The browser maker advised any netizens affected by the interference to install the latest version of Firefox, which reinstates support for SHA-1.

  • Firefox 43.0.4 Fixes Folder Creation on Linux and Brings Back SHA-1

    Mozilla has released a new version of Firefox, 43.0.4, which is just a maintenance release that happens to have an important fix for the Linux platform.

  • Mozilla: 40 Percent of Firefox Users Don't Have Add-Ons Installed

    According to an internal analysis, Mozilla staff estimates, based on anonymous telemetry data, that around 40% of its userbase does not have add-ons installed on their browser.

CES 2016: Firefox OS Still Alive, Powering New Panasonic UHD TV

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Moz/FF

The open source Firefox OS will be used to power new Panasonic DX900 UHD TVs, Mozilla and Panasonic have announced.

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Firefox OS will Power New Panasonic UHD TVs Unveiled at CES

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Linux
Moz/FF

Panasonic announced that Firefox OS will power the new Panasonic DX900 UHD TVs, the first LED LCD TVs in the world with Ultra HD Premium specification, unveiled today at CES 2016.

Panasonic TVs powered by Firefox OS are already available globally, enabling consumers to find their favorite channels, apps, videos, websites and content quickly and pin content and apps to their TV’s home screen.

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nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more

Fedora 24 -- The Best Distro for DevOps?

If you have been to any DevOps-focused conferences -- whether it’s OpenStack Summit or DockerCon -- you will see a sea of MacBooks. Thanks to its UNIX base, availability of Terminal app and Homebrew, Apple hardware is extremely popular among DevOps professionals. What about Linux? Can it be used as a platform by developers, operations, and DevOps pros? Absolutely, says Major Hayden, Principal Architect at Rackspace, who used to be a Mac OS user and has switched to Fedora. Hayden used Mac OS for everything: software development and operations. Mac OS has all the bells and whistles that you need on a consumer operating system; it also allows software professionals to get the job done. But developers are not the target audience of Mac OS. They have to make compromises. “It seemed like I had to have one app that would do one little thing and this other app would do another little thing,” said Hayden. Read more

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