Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Shuttleworth man heads to Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic.co.za: The Shuttleworth Foundation’s open philanthropy fellow, Mark Surman, will be moving to the Mozilla Foundation where he has been appointed executive director and will continue his work in open sourcing philanthropy.

Mozilla Re-Thinking Firefox EULA

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: In a conversation with InternetNews.com, Mitchell Baker, Chairperson of Mozilla, admitted that Mozilla may not need both the EULA and open source license, with the EULA the likely casualty.

Ubuntu, Firefox and License Issues

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mitchell Baker: Ubuntu recently included a patch that causes an End User License Agreement for Firefox to appear. This has caused great concern on several topics. One is the content of the agreement. Another is the presentation. A third is whether there’s any reason for a license at all.

Battle Brews Over Firefox In Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Firefox, what's not to love about this open-source web browser? Well, a number of users following the development work on Ubuntu 8.10 (the Intrepid Ibex) are feeling rather outraged over Mozilla Firefox 3.0.2 and later. In the latest Ubuntu packages, Firefox requires an EULA (End-User License Agreement) be accepted the first time you launch the browser.

Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

  • 5 Useful Tips to Customise Firefox 3
  • about:addons - Sep 13

Mozilla Colors

Filed under
Moz/FF

bholley.wordpress: I’ve been working on getting Mozilla’s color management backend ready for the prime time. We’re finally turning it on in tonight’s nightly builds, so I thought I’d give a bit of background on the history of color management in Mozilla and on color management in general.

Mozilla's Proposed 2010 Goals

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler.com: What can Mozilla do with our products and our product development processes to move the Internet toward our vision of an open, decentralized, participatory place in the next two years? In my last post I suggested we develop a set of goals to answer this question. Here’s my proposal.

Browser Battle: Firefox 3.1 vs. Chrome vs. IE 8

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: Mozilla's second alpha of Firefox 3.1 is upping the ante in the next-generation browser battle. So how do the main contenders stack up so far now? One thing's for sure, the Firefox team has taken note of Google's recent Chrome release and worked hard to make sure its offering can hold its own.

Polishing Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: In an effort to increase the level of Firefox’s visual and interactive polish, I’ll be posting a list of around 7 bugs every monday from now until we finish up Firefox 3.1.

Firefox download extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Download management is one of the larger categories on the Firefox Add-ons site, but while hundreds of extensions fall under this category, they are a mixed lot at best. However, with patience, you can find some programs worth exploring -- and even a few small treasures -- in this category.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Rugged mini-PC runs Android on Via’s Cortex-A9 SoC

Via debuted a rugged fanless low-power Android mini-PC based on Via’s dual-core Cortex-A9 Elite E1000 SoC, and offering mini-PCIe, mSATA, HDMI, and GbE I/O. Via designed the “Artigo A900″ mini-PC for use in Android-based interactive kiosks, home automation devices, signage, and other HMI solutions. The 125 x 125 x 30mm mini-PC can be configured to “blend locally-captured real-time video streams with cloud-delivered content to create visually-compelling interactive displays for retail, banking, museums, and other environments,” says Via Technologies. The device can integrate peripherals including sensors, cameras, ticket printers, and barcode and fingerprint scanners, adds the company. Read more

Newest Androids will join iPhones in offering default encryption, blocking police

The next generation of Google’s Android operating system, due for release next month, will encrypt data by default for the first time, the company said Thursday, raising yet another barrier to police gaining access to the troves of personal data typically kept on smartphones. Android has offered optional encryption on some devices since 2011, but security experts say few users have known how to turn on the feature. Now Google is designing the activation procedures for new Android devices so that encryption happens automatically; only somebody who enters a device's password will be able to see the pictures, videos and communications stored on those smartphones. Read more

X.Org Server Shatter Project Fails

Earlier this summer was the start of an X.Org-funded project to develop Shatter. Shatter has long been talked about as a new feature for the X.Org Server to replace Xinerama. Shatter comes down to allowing the X.Org Server to split the rendering between multiple GPUs with each GPU covering different areas of a larger desktop. A student from Cameroon hoped to develop the Shatter support after such feature was talked about for years. The student, Nyah Check, was being funded by the X.Org Foundation through the foundation's Endless Vacation of Code project that's similar in nature to Google's GSoC but runs year-round and is much more loose about requirements. Read more

today's howtos