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Moz/FF

Mozilla Wags Finger at Advertising Community

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Moz/FF

It's interesting to hear Mozilla taking this stance, because, after a series of kerfuffles with the Internet Advertising Bureau, the company is moving ahead with multiple initiatives that will put ads in front of Firefox browser users, including "directory tiles."

It was back in August of 2013 that The Internet Advertising Bureau started firing off screed after screed against Mozilla for its plans to block advertising cookies in the Firefox browser by default. The bureau even took out newspaper ads claiming that Mozilla's claims that it had a right to help users protect their privacy was basically hogwash.

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Firefox OS Shows Continued Global Growth

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Moz/FF

Three new smartphones have been launched in India and one in Bangladesh over the last few weeks, offering not only more affordable choice but the advent of a brand new ultra low-cost category.

Firefox OS is now available in Central America through Telefónica with launches in El Salvador, Panama, Nicaragua and Guatemala, and Deutsche Telekom launched the first Firefox OS devices in the Czech Republic and Macedonia.

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Is This How Mozilla Could Change the World?

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Moz/FF

As my post last week indicated, I'm increasingly sceptical of Mozilla's role as the key defender of the open Web, largely because of its decision to embrace DRM. Even as a purveyor of fine Web browsers, things don't look so rosy. Two years ago, its global market share was fairly stable around 20%; a year ago, that slipped to around 19%; today, it's slumped to 14%. Meanwhile, Google's Chrome has overtaken Firefox as the number two browser, and holds around 21% of the market. Obviously, these figures are to be taken with a serious grain of salt, but I think the trend is real. So, given these developments, the obvious question that needs to be answered is: where exactly does Mozilla's future lie?

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Testing a $35 Firefox OS phone—how bad could it be?

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Moz/FF
Reviews

Hey! You there! You've got it pretty good, you know that? While you're sitting there using your Internet-enabled device to read about some other Internet-enabled device, it's easy to forget that the majority of people doesn't have any access to the Internet at all. The "World Wide" Web is actually not that worldwide—only about one-third of the population is online. That's 4.8 billion people out there with no way to get to the Internet.

Bridging this digital divide will be one of the tech industry's biggest challenges—and growth opportunities—over the coming years. As all-encompassing as the Internet feels now, the user base has the potential to triple in size. So as of late, we've started to see Internet companies take an interest in getting more of the disconnected world online. Facebook launched Internet.org, and Google has a ton of projects that aim to provide Internet by fiber, balloon, and drone for example.

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Top 4 Alternatives for iOS and Android – Firefox, Ubuntu, Tizen and Sailfish

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Linux
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Firefox OS was developed by Mozilla and it made its appearance in 2012, but it was released one year later for smartphones and tablets, following to be used on smart TVs as well. It was built on HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript, which means that the websites are treated as applications and the HTML5 apps are communicating with the phone’s hardware through Web APIs. This makes it unique, but it’s not just a browser that runs on a Linux-based OS. Even the camera or the dialer are considered applications, and every website that is ran in the form of an app is accessed through Gecko engine. For now, the devices that can support Fire OS are Keon and Peak by Geeksphone.

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Firefox OS media-casting stick strikes Kickstarter gold

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Moz/FF

The first Firefox OS based media player has arrived on Kickstarter, in the form of a $25 open-spec HDMI stick that supports Chromecast-like content casting.

The Matchstick, which has already zoomed past its Kickstarter campaign’s $100,000 funding goal, with 28 days still remaining, was teased back in June by Mozilla developer evangelist Christian Heilmann. The unnamed prototype was billed as an open source HDMI stick that runs Mozilla’s Linux-based Firefox OS and offers casting capabilities. Few details were revealed at the time except that the device used the same DIAL (DIscovery And Launch) media-casting protocol created by Netflix and popularized by Google’s Chromecast.

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Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

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Moz/FF

Again, I think this is absolutely correct. But what it fails to recognise is that one of the key ways of making the Web medium "less free and open" is the use of legally-protected DRM. DRM is the very antithesis of openness and of sharing. And yet, sadly, as I reported back in May, Mozilla has decided to back adding DRM to the Web, starting first with video (but it won't end there...) This means Mozilla's Firefox is itself is a vector of attack against openness and sharing, and undermines its own lofty goals in the Open Web Fellows programme.

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Chromecast getting competition from Firefox OS-powered Matchstick

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OS
Moz/FF

The streaming stick market is apparently heating up. Google, Microsoft, and Amazon all have entrants in this space, and if a new Kickstarter appeal succeeds, there will soon be a Firefox OS stick getting in on the action.
Inspired by the Chromecast, the Matchstick will plug into your TV using HDMI, connect to devices locally using Wi-Fi, and be used as a streaming media platform. Unlike Chromecast, however, Matchstick will use the open source Firefox OS as its base, making it readily accessible to developers who will be able to build HTML apps for Matchstick that leverage open Web technologies.

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Tor executive director hints at Firefox integration

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Moz/FF
Security

Tor, which is capable of of all that and more, crucially blocks websites from learning any identifying information about you and circumvents censorship. It also stymies eavesdroppers from discovering what you’re doing on the Web. For those reasons, it would be a powerful addition to the arsenal of privacy tools Firefox already possesses.

The Tor Browser is already a modified version of Firefox, developed over the last decade with close communication between the Tor developers and Mozilla on issues such as security and usability.

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Pale Moon Shines for Classic Firefox Fans

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Moz/FF

Much of the good stuff about Pale Moon is under the hood. Taken together, all of it contributes to a more efficient performance. For example, Pale Moon is optimized for modern processors such as SSE2. A lot of the built-in bloat of the Firefox code is removed. That gets rid of things like accessibility features and WebRTC. The social API code is disabled by default.

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More in Tux Machines

Compact, rugged IoT gateway runs Linux on Quark

Adlink’s “Matrix MXE-100i” gateway runs Wind River’s Linux-based IDP XT IoT gateway stack on an Intel Quark processor, and offers multiple wireless options. The Matrix MXE-100i is a spinoff of the Matrix MXE-200i gateway computer announced by Adlink in February. Like the MXE-200i, the identically sized, 120 x 100 x 55mm MXE-100i comes preloaded with a Linux-based Internet of Things gateway software stack from Intel subsidiary Wind River, called Wind River Intelligent Device Platform XT. Read more

Media player mini-PC runs Android on 64-bit octa-core SoC

We no longer cover every Android media player or HDMI stick that comes around, but the new Tronsmart “Orion R68″ certainly caught our attention. (So did its similar predecessor, the quad-core Rockchip RK3288 based Orion R28). First, it runs Android 5.1, a bug-fixed and more secure version of Android 5.0 Lollipop, on a new Rockchip RK3368 system-on-chip, which combines eight Cortex-A53 cores clocked at up to 1.5GHz. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

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Btrfs In Linux 4.2 Brings Quota Updates, Many Fixes

Adding to the already lengthy list of new features for Linux 4.2 is the Btrfs file-system updates that were sent in today by Facebook's Chris Mason. The Btrfs file-system update for Linux 4.2 includes sub-volume quota updates, sysfs improvements, device management improvements, and various other changes. In total around 1,700 lines of Btrfs code were touched for this merge window. Read more Also: XFS Will Get DAX Support In The Linux 4.2 Kernel