Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Shipping Rust in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Shipping Rust in Firefox

    It’s hard to believe it’s been almost seven years since Mozilla Research first began sponsoring the development of Rust, at the time little more than an ambitious research experiment with a small but devoted community. Remarkably, despite a long history of inventions and discoveries, Rust’s key principles have remained constant. The Rust core team’s original vision—a safe alternative to C++ to make systems programmers more productive, mission-critical software less prone to memory exploits, and parallel algorithms more tractable—has been central to Mozilla’s interest in backing the Rust project and, ultimately, using Rust in production.

  • Firefox 48 Will Take The First Rust Code Into Production

    Mozilla will be taking their first Rust programming language code into production with Firefox 48.

    Beyond the Servo/Browser.html tech preview that's now shipping nightly, another goal of Mozilla developers for 2016 has been to ship at least one Servo/Rust component within the Gecko engine / Firefox. With Firefox 48, they are stepping along on that crusade with shipping their first Rust production code.

Mozilla News (Rust, Yahoo)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Announcing Rust 1.10

    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.10. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Rust 1.10 Programming Language Update

    Version 1.10 of the Rust programming language is now available.

    Rust 1.10 brings the -C panic=abort flag as their most-requested feature for yielding 10% smaller binaries and about 10% faster compilation time. Rust 1.10 also brings the new cdylib crate type for compiling Rust as a dynamic library to be embedded in another language. Rust 1.10 also has build system changes to allow it to be built with Rust 1.9 and that trend will continue to be supported for future releases.

  • Buyer beware: Mozilla deal demands up to $1 billion after Yahoo’s sale, Recode says

    According to a contract seen by Recode, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer struck a deal with Mozilla in 2014 specifying annual payments of $375 million to the browser creator in exchange for Yahoo's search engine appearing in the default position on Firefox. That $375 million price tag will be paid out every year until 2019 one way or another—even if Mozilla doesn’t like the company that buys Yahoo and decides to walk away.

    Of course, if Mozilla decides it likes whichever company buys the embattled search giant, then payments continue as before and the new owner of Yahoo’s search engine retains the default position on the browser.

Web Browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • WebVR Shell: Google Is Making Every Website On The Web Viewable In VR

    Boosting its efforts in the virtual reality technology, Google has brought the WebVR APIs to its Chrome web browser. In near future, one should expect a richer web full of VR-enabled websites that a person can explore using a VR headset.

  • Context Graph: It’s time to bring context back to the web

    The largest button on a modern browser is the back button. Trips to the web are short. Enter a search, get a result, click back, then try again. This feels backwards (forgive the pun!). What if there was a better forward button? One that helps you understand a topic better or find alternative solutions to a problem you’re solving? What if web browsers were immediately useful instead of demanding input when you launched them? Browsers could do so much more, through a better understanding of your behavior and by using the experience of people at human-scale to give you content that enriches your life, regardless of whom you know or where you live.

  • Mozilla Is Looking To Build A Recommendation System: Context Graph

    If Mozilla didn't already have their hands full with enough projects, the latest they are looking to engage in is a recommendation system to potentially upset the likes of Facebook and Google when it comes to looking for similar sites/resources.

  • This Coder Shows How To Play Games Inside A PDF File

    A GitHub user named Omar Rizwan has found a way to put games in PDF files. He even coded his own game after taking help from a tutorial. Rizwan has put the details of this Horrifying PDF Experiments on his repository.

Servo Nightly for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Servo Night Builds Begin, Linux Packages Coming

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

The Mozilla developers working on the Servo browser layout engine and the Browser.html HTML-based web UI have kept to their goal of making a tech preview available in June.

As of last night, the Servo developers hit their tech preview milestone we've been looking forward to seeing for months. Nightly builds of Servo and Browser.html have begun and they are going to be making available Linux packages shortly.

Read more

Mozilla involves the community in its “open-source” rebrand

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla is bending the terms of the rebrand with a “branding without walls” open-source initiative.

Read more

Mozilla Rebranding

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Pushes Online Privacy with New Open Source Funding Awards

    Mozilla is funneling yet more money into the open source ecosystem. This week, the organization best known for the Firefox Web browser announced an award of $385,000 to fund eight open source projects, including several important online privacy platforms.

  • Mozilla to Rebrand Itself, and You're Invited to Help

    Mozilla has been involved in reinventing itself for some time now. Known for the venerable Firefox browser, it has made forays into several other open source arenas, and was even known for its dalliance with the smartphone business. The company is currently involved in a broad rebranding effort, and the way it is going about rebranding comes directly from the open source playbook.

  • “Branding without walls”: Mozilla’s open-source rebrand

    Internet advocacy and software group Mozilla is rebranding with help from johnson banks. In an unusual move, the company has decided to document the process online – from strategy and concept development to refinement – inviting its community to help shape its new positioning

Mozilla rebrand

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Vimperator interface for Firefox Part 1

    Vimperator is a plugin for Firefox that completely overhauls the GUI to behave like Vim making your mouse unneeded for most web sites. If this was not available I would be attempting to create something much like it.

  • Contextual Identities on the Web

    We all portray different characteristics of ourselves in different situations. The way I speak with my son is much different than the way I communicate with my coworkers. The things I tell my friends are different than what I tell my parents. I’m much more guarded when withdrawing money from the bank than I am when shopping at the grocery store. I have the ability to use multiple identities in multiple contexts. But when I use the web, I can’t do that very well. There is no easy way to segregate my identities such that my browsing behavior while shopping for toddler clothes doesn’t cross over to my browsing behavior while working. The Containers feature I’m about to describe attempts to solve this problem: empowering Firefox to help segregate my online identities in the same way I can segregate my real life identities.

  • Multi-process Firefox and AMO

    In Firefox 48, which reaches the release channel on August 1, 2016, mullti-process support (code name “Electrolysis”, or “e10s”) will begin rolling out to Firefox users without any add-ons installed.

  • Fix Firefox resource URI leak

    Any website can access a selection of Firefox resource files to find out more about the web browser that is used to connect to the site.

  • Baby Steps: Slowly Porting musl to Rust

    TLDR: I’m toying with writing a C standard library in Rust by porting musl-libc over function-by-function.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Turi as FOSS

  • Fruit of an acquisition: Apple AI software goes open
    Apple's joined other juggernauts of the tech sector by releasing an open source AI framework. Turi Create 4.0, which landed at GitHub recently, is a fruit of its 2016 US$200 million acquisition of Turi. As the GitHub description explains, it targets app developers that want custom machine learning models but don't have the expertise to “add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity or activity classification” to their apps.
  • Apple Releases Turi ML Software as Open Source
    Apple last week released Turi Create, an open source package that it says will make it easy for mobile app developers to infuse machine learning into their products with just a few lines of code. “You don’t have to be a machine learning expert to add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity, or activity classification to your app,” the company says in the GitHub description for Turi Create. “Focus on tasks instead of algorithms.”

Security: Patch Management, Windows Keyloggers, and Fingerprinting MySQL

  • Open Source Patch Management: Options for DIYers [Ed: "Linux comes with patch management," it says, which defeats much of the point of this article...]
    CVE-2017-5638 is the code vulnerability that will long live in the corporate memory of Equifax, the credit ratings agency. A simple patch management system might have kept that vulnerability from turning into one of the most high-profile data breaches in recent memory. CVE-2017-5638 is a remote code execution bug that affects the Jakarta Multipart parser in Apache Struts, an open source application framework for developing Java EE web applications. Remote code execution bugs are generally extremely serious, and for that reason, when the vulnerability was discovered, the Apache Foundation recommended that any developers or users of affected versions of Struts upgrade to later versions that had been patched to close the vulnerability.
  • HP laptops found to have hidden keylogger

    HP said more than 460 models of laptop were affected by the "potential [sic] security vulnerability".

    [...]

    In May, a similar keylogger was discovered in the audio drivers pre-installed on several HP laptop models.

  • Fingerprinting MySQL with scannerl

    The goal here is to identify the version of MySQL running on a remote host.

Linux on Devices: Ataribox and More

  • With Ataribox, the Legend Returns -- Powered by Linux
    Available to pre-order on Thursday for a special price via an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, the Ataribox is shaping up to be an amalgam of retro gaming console and living room PC. Details are mostly sketchy at this point, but we do know that it will be powered by some variant of Linux OS and will include over 100 Atari classic games pre-installed.
  • Atari plans to open preorders for its Ataribox home console this Thursday
    Preorders for the Ataribox, the classic game company’s take on a NES Classic retro console, are slated to go live this Thursday, according to a report from CNET citing an email from Atari sent out today to interested consumers. The Ataribox was first teased back at E3 in June and then in a more formal unveiling in July, in which the Atari 2600-inspired PC was shown in two customization options: a wood-like finish or a more modern and sleek black and red look.
  • Rugged in-vehicle PC line includes Kaby Lake and Bay Trail models
    Ibase’s rugged MPT V-Series in-vehicle computers offer 7th/6th Gen Core or Bay Trail CPUs, plus 2x mini-PCIe, 3x M.2, and optional CAN or OBD-II links. Ibase announced a new line of fanless MPT V-Series computers for IoT applications, starting with two rugged, in-vehicle models: the MPT-7000V with Intel’s 7th (“Kaby Lake”) or 6th (“Skylake”) Generation Core processors and the MPT-3000V with a quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 from the Bay Trail generation with 10W TDP. The systems support Windows 7/10 or Linux with kernel 3.8.0. In both cases, 64-bit implementations are required in order to use the driver for the supplied G-sensor, which appears to be necessary for shock resistance.
  • Apollo Lake based IoT gateway and embedded controller runs Ubuntu
    Adlink’s rugged “MXE-210” gateway offers Atom x7-E3950 or x5-E3930 SoCs, industrial protocol support, and mini-PCIe wireless and storage options. The Intel Apollo Lake based MXE-210 adds to a line of rugged Adlink MXE computers such as the Bay Trail Atom based MXE-200i. The compact, 140 x 110 x 58mm MXE-210 is an “IIoT-ready combination embedded controller and IoT gateway” designed for rugged industrial automation, transportation, agriculture/aquaculture, and smart city applications, says Adlink.

Server/Back End: Orange, Oracle, Docker

  • With OPNFV, Orange Plans a Full-Scale Rollout of Network Functions Virtualization
    Over the past few years, the entire networking industry has begun to transform as network demands rapidly increase. This is true for both the technology itself and the way in which carriers — like my employer Orange, as well as vendors and other service providers — adapt and evolve their approach to meeting these demands. As a result, we’re becoming more and more agile and adept in how we virtualize our evolving network and a shifting ecosystem.” keep up with growing demands and the need to virtualize.
  • Oracle joins the serverless fray with Fn
    With its open source Fn project, Oracle is looking to make a splash in serverless computing. Fn is a container native serverless platform that can be run on-premises or in the cloud. It requires the use of Docker containers. Fn developers will be able to write functions in Java initially, with Go, Ruby, Python, PHP, and Node.js support planned for later. Applications can be built and run without users having to provision, scale, or manage servers, by using the cloud.
  • DevOps, Docker, and Empathy
    Just because we’re using containers doesn’t mean that we “do DevOps.” Docker is not some kind of fairy dust that you can sprinkle around your code and applications to deploy faster. It is only a tool, albeit a very powerful one. And like every tool, it can be misused. Guess what happens when we misuse a power tool? Power fuck-ups. Let’s talk about it. I’m writing this because I have seen a few people expressing very deep frustrations about Docker, and I would like to extend a hand to show them that instead of being a giant pain in the neck, Docker can help them to work better, and (if that’s their goal) be an advantage rather than a burden in their journey (or their “digital transformation” if we want to speak fancy.)