Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Mozilla Delivers Built-in HTML5 App Development Tool for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

If you work with web content at all, you're probably familiar with doing debugging and content editing directly from within a browser. If you're a Firefox user, you may also be very familiar with tools such as Firebug, which lets you do extensive debugging and development from within Firefox.
Now, Mozilla has announced a new toolset to take these kinds of capabilities to the next level. Firefox Nightly release channel users can start testing WebIDE, a development environment for HTML5 apps built into Firefox.

Read more

Mozilla puts a development environment into the browser with WebIDE

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla cites two major advantages of using WebIDE as compared with developing apps for competing platforms. In-browser development tools are already familiar to the enormous number of Web developers that exist, so using them for application development minimizes the number of new tools and new skills that must be learned.

Second, they're extremely lightweight as development tools go. The substantial size of downloading tools such as Xcode or Visual Studio, in addition to the cost of developer licenses on other platforms, can limit their appeal and usability, especially in emerging markets. Putting the tools into the browser means that Mozilla's reach is near universal.

Read more

Mozilla is Working on a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick à la Chromecast

Filed under
Linux
Google
Moz/FF

Mozilla took the world by surprised when it announced that it was developing a Firefox operating system that would be used for mobile phones, especially in developing markets. Now, there are already a few devices out there, but it seems that this isn’t the last step for the company whose name is still associated with the famous web browsers.

Read more

​How to Try Firefox OS Apps on Android

Filed under
Android
Moz/FF

Android: Mozilla is best known for its web browser, but the company also produces Firefox OS for a limited number of handsets. With a little sideways thinking, though, you can try some of its apps in Android.

Much like Google Chrome, Firefox supports webapps—the OS and apps are built with the same technology—and this is how you can bring Firefox OS to Android. Apps work like browser extensions, so they take up very little room making them ideal for older devices or those with limited storage. Download a copy of Firefox for Android from the Google Play Store, or update your existing copy to 29 or above.

Fire up Firefox and visit the Firefox Marketplace, the Firefox version of Google Play or the Chrome Web Store. Take a browse through the Marketplace and tap an app that takes your fancy. Just as with regular Android apps, Firefox OS apps let you know about the permissions they need, and you have to accept this before you install anything.

Read more

Fedora 21 Might Use Either GNOME Web Or A Custom Version Of Firefox, Built On GTK+3, As The Default Browser

Filed under
Red Hat
Moz/FF

The Fedora developers are discussing whether to replace Firefox with Gnome Web as the default browser on Fedora 21, due to the fact that the current Mozilla browser is built with GTK+2 and GNOME 3.14 uses GTK+3.

Gnome Web (previously name Epiphany) uses GTK+3, has support for HiDPI displays, provides good integration with Gnome Shell and supports hardware acceleration, while Mozilla’s browser doesn’t.

Due to the fact that Firefox is open-source, some Fedora developers have already started to port Firefox from GTK+2 to GTK+3. If everything goes well, the first GTK+3 based Firefox will be built on the Firefox 32 code base.

Read more

Where does troubled Mozilla go from here?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Once upon a time, it was simple. Mozilla, thanks to its open source web browser Firefox, was the feisty David to Microsoft's Internet Explorer Goliath.

Under the technical leadership of Brendan Eich, Mozilla co-founder and creator of JavaScript, Firefox became a force to be reckoned with in web browsing at a time when most people had conceded the web to Microsoft.

Read more

Mozilla begins repackaging Firefox OS apps for Android

Filed under
Android
Moz/FF

Mozilla has today extended its Open Web App repackaging to Android.

Users of Firefox for Android are now able to install apps from the Firefox Marketplace, and have them install and behave like a regular Android app.

"As a developer, you can now build your Open Web App for Firefox OS devices and have that app reach millions of existing Firefox for Android users without having to change a single line of code," said the announcement blog post.

Read more

Mozilla's Science Lab is a hub for the open research community

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Science Lab was created to serve as a neutral broker and hub for the open science community—a means of bridging the gap between the early adopters and the many scientists who understand the value of open science, but who have not yet (for a number of reasons) mapped that understanding onto their day-to-day workflow. We strive to connect and support the activity of the open research community and its diverse stakeholders (researchers, coders, funders, publishers) to work towards the common goal of making research more like the web: open, collaborative and accessible.

Read more

$25 Firefox phone heading for India

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

Mozilla said that Spreadtrum’s $25 Firefox OS phone will soon be carried by Intex and Spice in India, and it also signed up Taiwan-based Chunghwa Telecom.

It seems only fitting that the country that brought us the $25 tablet should also be the first to try out the $25 smartphone. While Datawind’s Android-based Aakash 2 (UbiSlate) actually sold for $38, Indian government subsidization dropped that closer to $25 for schoolchildren. It remains to be seen whether Spreadtrum will enjoy similar discounts from Indian carriers Intex and Spice to keep its budget Firefox OS phone at the promised $25. Perhaps tellingly, there was no $25 price mentioned in Mozilla’s latest announcement.

Read more

Mozilla Firefox 30 Binaries Now Available

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox 30 release announcement is imminent with the source and binaries for the upcoming browser update now being available.

For those interested, Mozilla Firefox 30.0 can be obtained from the Mozilla FTP server while we're still waiting for the official release announcement, which is likely coming in the day ahead.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi powered juggling performance

Flashing pins are spinning tens of feet into the air on a pitch dark stage. It's a juggling performance. All of the pins are perfectly synchronized to flash different colors in time to the music. It's part of the magic of theater and a special night out with friends to enjoy a distraction from daily life. Part of the magic—and why it's called magic—is that the audience doesn't know how these secrets are made backstage. Read more

Munich Reversal Turnaround, Linus on the Desktop, and Red Hat Time Protocol

Monday we reported that Munich was throwing in the Linux towel, but today we find that may not be exactly the case. In other news, Linus Torvalds today said he still wants the desktop. There are lots of other LinuxCon links and a few gaming posts to highlight. And finally today, Red Hat's Eric Dube explains RHEL 7's new time protocol. Read more

NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions. Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”. The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”. Read more

What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more