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Moz/FF

Thunderbird Under Mozilla, Research Grant

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Moz/FF
  • Thunderbird Email Client Finally Has a New Home

    The future of Thunderbird is looking a little more certain. It's been announced that the Mozilla Foundation will serve as Thunderbird's "future home".

  • Mozilla Awards Nearly $300,000 to Research Grant Winners

    We’re happy to announce the results of the Mozilla Research Grant program for the first half of 2017. This was a competitive process, and after three rounds of judging, we settled on funding nine proposals in five countries for a total of $299,444. These projects support Mozilla’s mission to make the internet safer, more empowering and more accessible.

Mozilla and Thunderbird are continuing together, with conditions

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Moz/FF

The Thunderbird e-mail client still has its supporters, but for the past couple of years, Mozilla has been making moves to distance itself from the project. In late 2015, Mozilla announced that it would be looking for a new home for Thunderbird, calling its continued maintenance "a tax" on Firefox development.

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Gordon Haff (Red Hat) on Containers, OpenShift.io Launched, OpenShift Containers at AWS, Mozilla's Embrace of Containers

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Red Hat
Moz/FF

Coming Soon in Firefox

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Moz/FF
  • If Firefox 57 would be released today, 2273 add-ons would be compatible

    The Firefox web browser is in a bit of a moving state right now in regards to the browser's add-on system and add-ons that are available for it.

    Mozilla plans to make Firefox 57 the first version of the browser that supports only WebExtensions. WebExtensions in plain old English are very similar to Google Chrome extensions, only that the Firefox version supports more powerful add-ons than Google Chrome does once Mozilla reaches feature parity with Chrome.

  • Firefox gets “Always open in Container” option

    Containers is a new feature of the Firefox web browser that is currently being tested and in active development.

    The feature allows you to launch websites and services in containers to separate them from one another in various ways.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 15

New Mozilla Foundation Board Members

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Moz/FF
  • New Mozilla Foundation Board Members: Mohamed Nanabhay and Nicole Wong

    Today, I’m thrilled to announce that Mohamed Nanabhay and Nicole Wong have joined the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors.

    Over the last few years, we’ve been working to expand the boards for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation. Our goals for the Foundation board roles were to grow Mozilla’s capacity to move our mission forward; expand the number and diversity of people on our boards, and; add specific skills in areas related to movement building and organizational excellence. Adding Mohamed and Nicole represents a significant move forward on these goals.

    We met Mohamed about seven years ago through former board member and then Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. Mohamed was at Al Jazeera at the time and hosted one of Mozilla’s first Open News fellows. Mohamed Nanabhay currently serves as the Deputy CEO of the Media Development Investment Fund (MDIF), which invests in independent media around the world providing the news, information and debate that people need to build free, thriving societies.

  • Why I’m joining the Mozilla Board by Mohamed Nanabhay

    Mozilla has been at the forefront of shaping internet culture and fighting to keep the Internet open. Being able to join the Board and be of service to that mission is an honor as the open internet played such an important role in my life and my work.

  • Why I’m joining the Mozilla Board by Nicole Wong

    It’s an honor for me to join the Mozilla Board. I’m so inspired by the Foundation’s mission and by the incredibly talented people that lead it. And, I’m looking forward to contributing to Mozilla’s plans to build out a leadership network focused on protecting the open Internet.

Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird

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Moz/FF
  • Containers, a Great Privacy Add-On Currently in Firefox Test Pilot

    While not Linux specific by any means, here is a Firefox add-on (currently in Firefox Test Pilot) that I've been using and I believe is beneficial to any Firefox user, especially those who want a bit of extra privacy.

    Containers are basically a way of isolating tabs to their own profiles (profile-per-tab, if you like). This isn't quite the same as separate profiles that Firefox allows you to start up the browser with, but the result is quite similar nonetheless: tabs are confined to their particular container, including cookies and login data, meaning you can not only have multiple logins (for example, one login of Gmail in your "Personal" tab container and another completely separate login in your "Work" tab container) but also prevent online trackers from piecing all your online habits together, more or less.

  • Ubuntu might retire Thunderbird
  • Proposal to start a new implementation of Thunderbird based on web technologies

Tor Browser and Firefox

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Moz/FF
  • Tor Browser 6.5.2 Features Important Security Updates from Firefox 45.9.0 ESR

    Tor Project announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second and probably the last scheduled point release of the Tor Browser 6.5 stable series of the anonymous web browser based on Mozilla Firefox.

    Tor Browser 6.5.2 is out for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, and it looks like it incorporates all the important security updates that Mozilla implemented in the Firefox 45.9.0 ESR (Extended Support Release), along with HTTPS-Everywhere 5.2.14 and NoScript 5.0.2.

  • This Simple Tweak Will (Apparently) Make Firefox Faster
  • Firefox 53 Introduces Quantum Compositor, Reducing Browser Crashes

    Mozilla released its Firefox 53 update on April 19, introducing a new browser engine and patching 39 vulnerabilities in the open-source web browser.

    The new browser engine technology in Firefox 53 is known as Project Quantum and is a multipart effort to accelerate and improve the web browsing experience for users. The Project Quantum component included in Firefox 53 is known as the Quantum Compositor; it is designed to help reduce the number of browser crashes due to graphics issues.

Mozilla Thunderbird, Firefox, and Google Blocking Ads?

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Google
Moz/FF
  • Mockups of a new Thunderbird style look quite incredible
  • Mozilla Firefox web browser may no longer be supported on your Linux computer

    Firefox is a wonderful open source web browser. As a result, it comes pre-loaded on many Linux-based operating systems, such as Ubuntu and Fedora. Yeah, some people choose to install Chromium or Chrome instead, but Mozilla's offering remains a staple in the Linux community.

  • Mozilla, Microsoft rebuilding their browsers’ foundations without anyone noticing

    Project Quantum is how Mozilla plans to adapt for this new age. Mozilla is using its safer Rust programming language for parts of Quantum. The company has an experimental rendering engine called Servo that's written in Rust, and pieces of this will make their way into Firefox. The initial focus will be on updating those parts of Gecko that are most amenable to parallel or GPU-based computation, and Firefox 53 contains the first element of this. Firefox 53 will (for most people; it requires Windows 7 with the Platform Update, or better, plus a GPU that isn't blacklisted) create a separate GPU process that's used to perform compositing. The compositor process takes the different elements of the page and the Firefox window and merges them together to create the finished product.

  • Will Google move to block adverts?

    Google's vast wealth and huge influence is built on one thing - advertising - so it might seem bizarre for the search giant to make it less likely that users would see ads.

    But the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google is planning to introduce ad-blocking in its popular Chrome web browser.

  • Google might roll out their own ad-blocker in Chrome

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • If Only Thunderbird Did Look Like This…

    If Thunderbird looked like the design you see above would there be any question on whether Ubuntu should drop it from the default install? I think not.

  • Ubuntu might retire Thunderbird

    The open saucy Ubuntu is considering dumping the Thunderbird mail app because users tend to favour using webservices mail instead.

    Ubuntu 17.10 may not include a default desktop email app at all and Thunderbird is Ubuntu’s default email app at the moment.

  • Firefox 53 Released With 2 New Compact Themes

    Mozilla Firefox 53 has been released, and is now available to download right now. The latest release of the popular open-source web-browser ships with two new compact themes, reader mode improvements, and updated site permission requests.

  • This April, Mozilla is Standing Up for Science

    We believe openness is a core component not just of a healthy Internet, but also a healthy society. Much like open practices can unlock innovation in the realm of technology, open practices can also invigorate fields like civics, journalism — and science.

    In laboratories and at academic institutions, open source code, data and methodology foster collaboration between researchers; spark scientific progress; increase transparency and encourage reproducibility; and better serve the public interest.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!
    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it. Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different. Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.
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  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin
    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first. The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.
  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release
    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu. For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.
  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger
    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.

Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum

  • "NonDesktop" Proposed For RandR: Useful For VR & Apple Touch Bar Like Devices
    Besides Keith Packard working on the concept of resource leasing for the X.Org Server and resource leasing support for RandR, he's also now proposing a "NonDesktop" property for the Resize and Rotate protocol. The resource leasing has already been worked out as a candidate for the next update, RandR 1.6, while now this veteran X11 developer is proposing a new "NonDesktop" property for identifying outputs that are not conventional displays.
  • More AMDGPU Changes Queue For Linux 4.15
    Adding to the excitement of Linux 4.15, AMD has queued some more changes that were sent in today for DRM-Next. Already for Linux 4.15, the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver should have the long-awaited "DC" display stack that brings Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting and more. Other pull requests have also brought in a new ioctl, UVD video encode ring support on Polaris, transparent huge-pages DMA support, PowerPlay clean-ups, and many fixes, among other low-level improvements.
  • Opus Magnum, the latest puzzle game from Zachtronics, is released into Early Access
    The developers behind the challenging puzzle games TIS-100 and SHENZEN I/O are at it again and have released their latest title into Steam’s Early Access today.
  • Open your wallets, there's some great Linux games on sale right now
    It's time to throw your wallet at your screen, as we're going to take a look at some awesome Linux games on sale.

System 76 and Purism Laptops

  • POP!_OS is a developer-focused minimalist Linux distro from System 76
    There aren’t that many Linux hardware manufacturers around. Of the few that exist, System 76 is amongst the most well-known. It offers a slew of laptops and desktops, all shipping with the popular Ubuntu distro pre-installed, saving customers hours of wasted time dealing with driver hell. But it recently announced it’s changing gears and creating its own Linux distro, which will replace Ubuntu on its systems, called POP!_OS.
  • Purism’s Linux laptops now ship with Intel Management Engine disabled
    Most computers that ship with recent Intel processors include something called Intel Management Engine, which enables hardware-based security, power management, and remote configuration features that are not tied to the operating system running on your PC. For free software proponents, this has been a pain in the behind, because it’s a closed-source, proprietary feature designed to provide remote access to a computer even when it’s turned off. While it’s designed to provide security, it also poses a potential security and privacy threat, since it’s a proprietary system that can only be patched by Intel
  • Purism Now Shipping Their Laptops With Intel ME Disabled
    Purism has announced today all laptops to be shipping from their company will now have the Intel Management Engine (ME) disabled. Thanks to work done by security researches in recent years for finding ways to disable ME, especially in light of recent security vulnerabilities, Purism's Coreboot-equipped laptops are now shipping with ME disabled out-of-the-box. Those already with a Librem laptop are able to apply a firmware update to also disable it.