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Moz/FF

Porteus Kiosk Edition Is an Operating System Based on Slackware and Firefox

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OS
Moz/FF
Slack

Porteus 3.1 (Kiosk Edition) is based on Slackware 14.0 and relies on Linux kernel 3.12.20 and Firefox 24.0. It's a 32-bit system, which is entirely locked down to prevent tampering with any of the components (including the browser).

“This distribution release includes bug fixes, software updates and new features. At a mere 50 megabytes, the Porteus Kiosk Edition ISO includes just the libraries and utilities required to run Firefox in a secure environment, making this a perfect fit for kiosks and other web terminals.”

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Mozilla: Publish and be DRM'd!

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Moz/FF

The publishing industry would give anything to have the option to impose DRM on all online text in the same way that the film industry has for video. Indeed, publishers were so desperate to add DRM to ebooks that many of them adopted Amazon's DRM system without thinking it through. By effectively making Amazon's system the de facto DRM standard, the publishing industry has handed control of the ebook system to the retailer - read this excellent post by Charlie Stross for a full explanation of what happened and what it means.

That experience, I think, is why the publishing industry has not so far pushed for DRM on the Web: it needed a completely neutral DRM standard that would not give control to any one entity. The new HTML5 DRM framework provides publishers with exactly what they need: power over users, but independence from any one DRM supplier.

DRM for video is simply a Trojan Horse for all the copyright industries. Once all the main browsers have adopted it for video, the publishing (and music) industry will be able to point out that extending it to their media will be a small step now that the basic plumbing is in place. By acquiescing in this move, Mozilla makes it even more certain that this will happen.

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DRM in Firefox is The End of Our Digital Security

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Moz/FF

Mozilla recently decided to add DRM in Firefox even if Mozilla hates it. Almost all video streaming websites use some kind of DRM and as Microsoft, Apple and Google has already implemented DRM in their browsers, Mozilla thinks not adding the DRM in Firefox would make it useless as a product as the user will have to switch to other browser everytime a user visits a website with DRM.

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Pale Moon: Firefox Without DRM, Interface Breakage

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Moz/FF

Pale Moon is a fork of Firefox for Windows and Linux, but it doesn't come down to a silly theming fork or other basic changes. The fundamental differences between upstream Firefox and Pale Moon is that they will not be implementing HTML5 DRM/EME support, they are sticking with the original Firefox interface rather than the new Australis UI, and they will not be accepting sponsored ad pages / tiles.

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To Serve Users

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Moz/FF

In the old science fiction story, To Serve Man (which later was adapted for the The Twilight Zone), aliens come to earth and freely share various technological advances, and offer free visits to the alien world. Eventually, the narrator, who remains skeptical, begins translating one of their books. The title is innocuous, and even well-meaning: To Serve Man. Only too late does the narrator realize that the book isn't about service to mankind, but rather — a cookbook.

It's in the same spirit that Baker seeks to serve Firefox's users up on a platter to the MPAA, the RIAA, and like-minded wealthy for-profit corporations. Baker's only defense appears to be that other browser vendors have done the same, and cites specifically for-profit companies such as Apple, Google, and Microsoft.

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Firefox’s adoption of closed-source DRM breaks my heart

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Moz/FF

Future versions of the open-source Firefox browser will include closed-source digital rights management (DRM) from Adobe, the Mozilla project’s chief technology officer, Andreas Gal, announced on Wednesday.

The purpose is to support commercial video streams. But this is a radical, disheartening development in the history of the organisation, long held out as a beacon for the open, free spirit of the web as a tool for liberation.

As Gal’s blogpost makes clear, this move was done without much enthusiasm, out of a fear that Firefox (Mozilla’s flagship product and by far the most popular free/open browser in the world) was being sidelined by Apple, Google and Microsoft’s inclusion of proprietary technology to support Netflix and other DRM-encumbered videos in their browsers.

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Mozilla wants to teach you how to teach others about the Web

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Moz/FF

Almost two years after launching its Webmaker initiative, Mozilla is launching a new online crash-course to give anyone the skills to teach other people about using and building on the Web.

It’s called Webmaker Training and features four modules covering the basics of the Internet, how to use Mozilla’s current crop of Webmaker tools, nurturing open learning and engaging with other communities on the Web.

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Mirantis Launches Vendor Database for OpenStack Cloud Computing

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Moz/FF

Mirantis is aiming to make it easier for enterprises to deploy OpenStack, the open source infrastructure for cloud computing. This week, the company launched a Web-based database listing vendors who offer OpenStack-compatible solutions.

The database is available now as a Web-based dashboard on Mirantis's website. The company derived the information on OpenStack compatibility from the OpenStack DriverLog, which keeps track of drivers and plugins that support OpenStack.

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Mozilla Decides Against Ads In The New Tab Page

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Moz/FF

In a blog post on Friday, Johnathan Nightingale as the VP of Firefox shared that they are no longer pursuing advertisements within the New Tab page. "[A lot of our community found the language hard to decipher, and worried that we were going to turn Firefox into a mess of logos sold to the highest bidder; without user control, without user benefit.] That's not going to happen. That's not who we are at Mozilla," he wrote.

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You can buys ZTE’s Firefox phone for $99 on eBay

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Moz/FF

The ZTE Open C smartphone, which was first showed off at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) tradeshow in February, is being sold on eBay for a wallet-friendly $99.99. Running the latest version of Mozilla’s open source Firefox OS, the new phone is an upgraded version of the earlier ZTE Open which was sold for $80 in the US. The unlocked smartphone packs a 4-inch screen, 1.2GHz dual-core processor, 512MB of memory, 3-megapixel camera, and 4GB of storage.

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More in Tux Machines

Technology on a Diet: 5 Reasons to Embrace Open Source

Sharing information in the name of innovation isn’t anything new. Collaborative intelligence helped publish the Oxford English Dictionary, spur advances in 19th century science and powered the world’s first automobile. Even Ben Franklin insisted on donating his bifocals and lightning rod to the public domain, likely dubbing him America’s first open-source advocate. The notion of “open source” predates software and the Internet by centuries, yet many of today’s largest government IT shops are still reluctant to turn to open alternatives from proprietary software, even in the face of shrinking budgets, overworked staff and heightened citizen expectations. Read more

Performance and security in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Modern datacenters and next-generation IT requirements depend on capable platforms, with open source solutions offering a strong foundation for open hybrid cloud and enterprise workloads. A powerful, unified platform enables enterprises to use a solid foundation to balance demand while utilizing new trends and technologies such as virtual machines and the open hybrid cloud. Read more

Apple privacy policy frustrates government

The release of the Apple iOS 8 software meant that Apple updated its privacy policy. As a company that has always put personal privacy above all else, this means you can expect your personal information to be even more protected than before. But to what extent should you expect privacy, and at what point is the government going to step in and say no? What privacy can you expect? You might be wondering if the Apple privacy policy means you can avoid all government spying. Of course, that would be impossible. As Fox News explains, Apple can only control the information associated with its phones and Apple accounts. All other information is controlled elsewhere. For example, a phone tap could still happen because Apple does not provide the cell service, just the device. And spying through social media is still possible. The only things covered in the Apple privacy policy is anything associated with your Apple account, such as uploads to your cloud, photo storage, email, contacts, and even call history. More or less, Apple has explained that it cannot access the data simply because it has created a privacy system where it cannot bypass your passcode. If a warrant is placed for access to account information, Apple can deny it because it has no way to access the info. For cops, this means they don’t have access even if they get judge authority. For you, it means your information is protected in all circumstances. Government action? It is possible the government could come in and say that Apple has to retain access to accounts in the event of a national crisis or threat to the nation; however, that has not yet happened. For now, Apple intends to provide as much privacy as possible to its customers, so they feel comfortable using their personal devices without fear of information leaking. Some people are hesitant to trust Apple after the incident of leaked nude celebrity photos from the iCloud, but Apple says those were isolated incidents where hackers stole passcode data to get the images rather than the photos just getting leaked. Privacy important to customers As you are working on your automated text systems and allowing your customers to text you for an automated response, it is important that you keep their information private as well. There is nothing that will make a customer leave faster than finding out you just sold their personal information to another company. Make sure you have a privacy policy on your texting services clearly laid out when your customers sign up and again on your website to prevent confusion. Mobile technology news brought to you by businesstexter.com Source: foxnews.com/tech/2014/09/18/expert-apple-is-making-life-more-difficult-for-cops/

10 Android Smartphone Alternatives to the Apple iPhone 6

Apple might not have the most mobile market share or sell the most units, but it can get more attention than any other mobile device maker. Year after year, it's able to build anticipation for its latest products to a fever pitch. That has become abundantly apparent in the wake of the iPhone 6 launch. While there are still countless devices available that might in one way or another top the iPhone 6 in terms of features or price, it's Apple's product that generates the most hype. But now that the iPhone 6 is shipping, consumers who aren't already totally committed to Apple's products will go back to calmly considering in the clear light of day which product offers the best deal—the iPhone or one of the many handsets that run Android. This eWEEK slide show looks at 10 Android smartphones ranging from lower-cost units to the top-of-the-line flagship models that might prove to be suitable alternatives to the iPhone. From the Samsung Galaxy S5 to the Amazon Fire Phone, there are Android handsets that can suit any mobile phone buyer's needs. Read more