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Moz/FF

Mozilla Thunderbird 31.6.0 Is Now Available for Download, Thunderbird 38.0 Pushed to Beta Channel

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Moz/FF

Immediately after releasing the final version of the Mozilla Firefox 37.0 web browser, which brings native HTML5 playback on YouTube, Mozilla has also released a new maintenance version of its acclaimed Mozilla Thunderbird email, news, and chat software.

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Mozilla Firefox 37.0 Is Now Available for Download

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Moz/FF

We’re happy to announced that the final builds of the popular Mozilla Firefox 37.0 web browser were published on Mozilla’s download servers for all supported computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

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Mozilla cares for community with educational resources

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Moz/FF

I love the opportunity and inspiration of open source participation—the chance to tinker with and influence new innovation and social change. Seeing my contributions become part of something bigger continues to be both an empowering and humbling experience.

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Firefox OS ported to MIPS on Ingenic tablet

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Moz/FF

Imagination is hosting a raffle for a 9.7-inch, MIPS-based Ingenic tablet that runs a MIPS port of Firefox OS, which will also support its Creator C120 SBC.

An “experimental” version of Firefox OS has been ported to the MIPS architecture in the form of an unnamed Ingenic reference tablet announced by Imagination Technologies. Imagination designs the IP for the MIPS32 cores and PowerVR SGX540 GPU incorporated in the tablet’s Ingenic XBurst SoC. There are five days left to sign up for an Imagination raffle of 15 of the tablets, which are loaded with Firefox OS, but also support Android 4.4

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Imagination Technologies wants to take MIPS mainstream with Firefox OS tablet

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Linux
Moz/FF

A couple of weeks ago, in a shadowy corner of a fancy coffee house in London, I was handed a rather interesting gadget: a white, nondescript 9.7-inch tablet. I tapped the power button, and the Firefox OS lock screen appeared. That wasn't the surprising bit, though. Rather unusually, there was a MIPS-based CPU inside the device.

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Netscape: the web browser that came back to haunt Microsoft

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Microsoft
Moz/FF

But even when Microsoft engineers built a TCP/IP stack into Windows, the pain continued. Andreessen and his colleagues left university to found Netscape, wrote a new browser from scratch and released it as Netscape Navigator. This spread like wildfire and led Netscape’s founders to speculate (hubristically) that the browser would eventually become the only piece of software that computer users really needed – thereby relegating the operating system to a mere life-support system for the browser.

Now that got Microsoft’s attention. It was an operating-system company, after all. On May 26, 1995 Gates wrote an internal memo (entitled “The Internet Tidal Wave”) which ordered his subordinates to throw all the company’s resources into launching a single-minded attack on the web browser market. Given that Netscape had a 90% share of that market, Gates was effectively declaring war on Netscape. Microsoft hastily built its own browser, named it Internet Explorer (IE), and set out to destroy the upstart by incorporating Explorer into the Windows operating system, so that it was the default browser for every PC sold.

The strategy worked: Microsoft succeeded in exterminating Netscape, but in the process also nearly destroyed itself, because the campaign triggered an antitrust (unfair competition) suit which looked like breaking up the company, only to founder at the last moment. So Microsoft lived to tell the tale, and Internet Explorer became the world’s browser. By 2000, IE had a 95% market share; it was the de facto industry standard, which meant that if you wanted to make a living from software development you had to make sure that your stuff worked in IE. The Explorer franchise was a monopoly on steroids.

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GNOME Control Center Updated to Support Firefox Nightly Builds in GNOME 3.14

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Moz/FF
GNOME

While we prepare our GNU/Linux distributions for the anticipated GNOME 3.16 desktop environment, which will be unveiled next Wednesday, on March 25, 2015, the GNOME development team still updates some of the core components of the current stable release of the desktop, GNOME 3.14.

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Mozilla Releases Firefox 36.0.3 to Patch the Security Vulnerabilities Disclosed at Pwn2Own

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Moz/FF

Mozilla has just updated its popular Firefox web browser application for all supported computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. The new stable release is now Mozilla Firefox 36.0.3 and you should receive it via the built-in updater tool of the software.

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Seamonkey review: Firefox’s lightweight hyper-functional cousin

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Moz/FF
Reviews
Web

Seamonkey has an interesting history, in that it is both older and younger than Firefox. Older, because originally it was built from Mozilla Suite code (for those of you that don’t know, Mozilla Application Suite is the parent of Firefox, and was originally built from the code of Netscape Navigator which was open-sourced in 1998).

Seamonkey is also younger than Firefox in that Seamonkey’s first version, 1.0, was not released until 2006, 2 years after Firefox 1.0. Quite a few people are not even aware of the existence of Seamonkey or the Mozilla Suite, thinking that Firefox was the successor to Netscape Navigator, created deliberately to enact their vendetta against Microsoft for their monopolistic practices that killed Netscape. But glorious fantasies aside, Mozilla Application Suite was the real successor.

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Mozilla Releases Open Source Masche Forensics Tool

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Moz/FF
OSS
Security

Mozilla has released an open source memory forensics tool that some college students designed and built during the company’s recent Winter of Security event.

The new tool, known as Masche, is designed specifically for investigating server memory and has the advantage of being able to scan running processes without causing any problems with the machine. Masche runs on Linux, OS X and Windows and Mozilla has posted the code on GitHub.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Q4OS 1.4.1 Linux Distro Lands with Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.1

The developers of the Debian-based Q4OS Linux distribution sent an email to Softpedia earlier today to inform us about the release and immediate availability for download of the Q4OS 1.4.1 operating system. Read more

Canonical Patches Critical Linux Kernel Issues in Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04 LTS

On September 3, Canonical informed its users about new Linux kernel updates for its Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems, patching two critical issues, one for each of the aforementioned distributions. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Xiaomi is rumored to be working on a Laptop... running Linux!
  • Xiaomi aims to knock Apple off its branch with move into computers
  • Xiaomi's Macbook Pro killer will run Linux
    Xiaomi is known for its popular clones of Apple's iPhone and iPad. Now the Chinese company is rumored to be working on a Linux-based alternative to Apple's Macbook Pro laptop.
  • Acer Announces Predator 8 Gaming Tablet With Intel Atom x7 And Android 5.1
  • Acer Predator 8: A $299 Android gaming tablet
    Acer is launching its first Android tablet designed for gaming. The company’s been showing off the device for months, but now it’s official: the Acer Predator 8 is a tablet with an 8-inch IPS display, an Intel Atom x7 Cherry Trail processor, and a $299 price tag.
  • Acer Launch New $299 Convertible Chromebook
  • Acer offers convertible Chromebook for $299
    Chromebooks have been burning up the sales charts on Amazon. And now convertible Chromebooks seem to be where the market is headed. Acer has jumped on the convertible bandwagon by announcing the Chromebook R11. This new model offers notebook and tablet functionality built into one Chromebook.
  • Linux Foundation is giving away Chromebooks
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization that sponsors Linus Torvalds and runs many programs to accelerate the growth of Linux, is now giving away free Chromebooks to those who enroll in one of its training courses during September. Free Chromebook. To everyone. Throughout September. The foundation has chosen Dell’s Chromebook 11 for this program. The $299 Chromebook features a 11.6" display, is powered by 1.4Ghz processor, and comes with 4GB of RAM.
  • CloudRouter now live
    The collaborative open-source CloudRouter project has come out of beta.
  • Linux Kernel Engineer opportunity at Collabora!
    Collabora is a software consultancy specialising in bringing companies and the open source software community together and it is currently looking for a Core Software Engineer, that works in the Linux kernel and/or all the plumbing around the kernel. In this role the engineer will be part of worldwide team who works with our clients to solve their Linux kernel and low level stack technical problems.
  • DevOps: An Introduction
    Not too long ago, software development was done a little differently. We programmers would each have our own computer, and we would write code that did the usual things a program should do, such as read and write files, respond to user events, save data to a database, and so on. Most of the code ran on a single computer, except for the database server, which was usually a separate computer. To interact with the database, our code would specify the name or address of the database server along with credentials and other information, and we would call into a library that would do the hard work of communicating with the server. So, from the perspective of the code, everything took place locally. We would call a function to get data from a table, and the function would return with the data we asked for. Yes, there were plenty of exceptions, but for many application-based desktop applications, this was the general picture.
  • The Comparison and Context of Unikernels and Containers
    Talk about unikernels is starting to gain momentum. Still, these are such early days for this technology that implements the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions. Its functionality is a topic we discussed last month in a post by Russell Pavlicek of Citrix. As Pavlicek wrote, unikernels implement the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions — just enough to enable the application it powers.
  • FISH – A smart and user-friendly command line shell for Linux
  • This is what we do if someone offers us some constructive criticism
    We in KDE don’t ignore constructive feedback, so at Akademy, we set out to find solutions to the issues he pointed out. In order to maximize the reach of our efforts’ documentation, I decided to write a two-part series about it over at Linux Veda, a “web-magazine to share and spread knowledge about Linux and Open Source technologies” which has always been very interested in – and generally supportive of – KDE.
  • Calligra 2.9.7 Open-Source Office Suite Adds Multiple Kexi and Krita Improvements
  • [Krita] Updating the Shop!
  • GNOME 3.18 Beta 2 Officially Released, Final Version Coming on September 23
    The GNOME Project sent an email to Softpedia a few minutes ago, informing us of the release of the second Beta build of the upcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.
  • Why Samsung’s new smartwatch doesn’t run Android
    Samsung has released some more information on its next generation of smartwatches, the Gear S2. Unlike most of the spate of non-Apple watches being released this week, it’s not running Android Wear. Instead, Samsung has opted to continue using Tizen, the Linux-based operating system that powers its smart TVs and some phones in India.
  • How to Make Unbreakable Passwords In Your Head Using Mental Cryptography
    You're supposed to have distinct passwords for every one of your different accounts, and, what's more, those passwords are supposed to be difficult. Use some numbers and symbols and weird capitalization, they tell us. But it's hard, and so we wind up just using the same password for everything and taking the risk.
  • Thursday's security advisories

today's howtos