Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Is your open source community optimized for contributors?

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF
OSS

Josh Matthews is a platform developer at Mozilla. He's a programmer who writes Rust code and is active in the development of Firefox. His development experience has led him to enjoy mentoring new contributors in open source projects.

Read more

Safety/Privacy in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Firefox and cookie micromanagement

    For most of its existence, Firefox has provided users with the ability to manage how cookies are stored with a rather high degree of granularity: users can block specific cookies, create site-wide exceptions to the accept/block policy, and configure behavior for third-party cookies. Up until Firefox 44, there was an additional option as well, one that allowed users to choose the expiration point (that is, expiring them at the end of the session or letting them persist) for every cookie they encounter. That option was removed in the Firefox 44 release, which has made some users rather unhappy.

    The option in question was found in the Privacy preferences screen, labeled "Ask me every time" on the "Keep until:" selector. When enabled, the option raised a dialog box asking the user to accept or reject each cookie encountered, with a "accept for this session only" choice provided. Removing the option was proposed in 2010, although the patch to perform the removal did not land until 2015. It was released in Firefox 44 in January 2016.

  • How Safe Browsing works in Firefox

    If you want to learn more about how Safe Browsing works in Firefox, you can find all of the technical details on the Safe Browsing and Application Reputation pages of the Mozilla wiki or you can ask questions on our mailing list.

  • Decentraleyes Addon Fixes Browser Privacy, Circumvents CDNs

    Widespread CDN acceptance has been a security flaw that sacrifices privacy simply because it breaks web pages on anything put a text-based browser, which is a sacrifice few are willing to make for the sake of their information remaining local.

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Memory Usage of Firefox with e10s Enabled
  • A WebAssembly Milestone: Experimental Support in Multiple Browsers

    WebAssembly is an emerging standard whose goal is to define a safe, portable, size- and load-time efficient binary compiler target which offers near-native performance—a virtual CPU for the Web. WebAssembly is being developed in a W3C Community Group (CG) whose members include Mozilla, Microsoft, Google and Apple.

  • Advantages of WebExtensions for Developers

    Presently, Firefox supports two main kinds of add-ons. First were XUL or XPCOM add-ons, which interface directly with the browser’s internals. They are fabulously powerful, as powerful as the browser itself. However, with that power comes security risk and the likelihood that extensions will break as the browser changes.

Mozilla Firefox 45.0 Gets Its First Point Release, Brings Back Non-Standard JAR

Filed under
Moz/FF

Today, March 17, 2016, Mozilla unveiled the first point release of the recently announced Firefox 45.0 web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla will emit 'first version' of Servo-based Rust browser in June

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Servo is a cross-platform browser engine that will run on ARM operating systems (including Android) as well as on x64 platforms including Linux, OS X and Windows. It is designed to take advantage of parallelism in order to achieve optimum performance on today's multi-core systems.

Servo is coded in Rust, a language designed to ensure thread-safe concurrency and with a greater emphasis on security and safety than C++ – a language Mozilla says is poorly suited to preventing problems like memory bugs and data races.

Read more

Mozilla News (Servo and Virtual Reality)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Initial Servo+Browser.html Release Planned For June

    Paul Rouget of Mozilla has shared plans for making an initial alpha release of their next-generation Servo Engine and Servo-based Browser.html web browser release for this summer.

    The first version of Servo and Browser.html is planned for release in June. Browser.html is Mozilla's experimental web browser built atop Servo where the UI itself is built in HTML. While a Servo Alpha release was originally expected in 2015, it's great to see a release now planned in a few months.

  • Mozilla A-Frame Powers New Amnesty International Virtual Reality Website #360Syria

    Amnesty International today announced a new #360Syria “virtual tour” website showing the devastation brought by Syrian government barrel bombing of the besieged city of Aleppo. The website demonstration, called “Fear of the Sky” (www.360Syria.com), is built using Mozilla A-Frame technology.

    Websites like #360Syria, that allow viewers to take a virtual tour of the devastated city of Aleppo, are a significant new use case for WebVR. Technology gives people a voice where otherwise there is none. It brings a new level of visibility and greater levels of empathy to real-life situations.

Features Of Mozilla's Firefox 46 Beta Include GTK3 On Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF

For those sticking to Mozilla's stable channel, following this week's release of Firefox 45 was the public beta of Firefox 46.0.

The Firefox 46.0 Beta marks HTTP sites with login forms as insecure, the JavaScript JIT compiler features greater security, GTK3 integration is again being tried by default for Firefox on Linux, WebRTC performance/stability fixes, HKDF support for the Web Crypto API, and other changes.

Read more

Mozilla Teases Linux Users Again with the GTK3 Integration, Now for Firefox 46.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

Now that everyone's happy enjoying the latest Firefox 45.0 web browser, which once again failed to deliver the GTK3 integration on the Linux platform, bleeding-edge users can jump again into the Beta bandwagon, this time for Firefox 46.0.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.