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Interviews

Audiocasts: This Week in Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Linux in the Ham Shack, Going Linux and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

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Interviews
  • Episode 59 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ll talk about some big releases from the GNOME desktop environment, Sway window manager, distro releases from Lakka, KNOPPIX and UBports’ Ubuntu Touch. I’ve got a couple of announcements for this show, TuxDigital and a Linux Conference I will be attenting so be sure to check out that segment. We’ll also check out some new releases from Audacity, Mesa drivers, NetworkManager, TLP project and more. We’ll also look at a new file sharing service provided by Mozilla. Then we’ll discuss some news from the Linux Foundation, Debian and Humble Bundle. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews.

  • FLOSS Weekly 522: Railroader

    Railroader is a security static analysis tool for applications that use Ruby on Rails. Railroader will examine custom code to look for potential problems, and warn about them. Railroader can't find every vulnerability, but it's a great tool to help find problems before they hurt anyone. It is a static analysis tool - that means it does not try to run the application users are analyzing. Railroader is an OSS fork of the Brakeman project, which has gone proprietary

  • LHS Episode #276: Logical Volume Management Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 276 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a relatively in-depth look at the world of Logical Volume Management under Linux. LVM is a method for creating redundant, scalable and highly available disk volumes that can span multiple physical drives and media types. The topic is more immersive than could be covered in one episode but this should be a good initial primer for anyone looking to explore what LVM can offer. Thanks for listening.

  • Going Linux #365 · Listener Feedback

    We hear from George about Windows and printers. Roger and Gord also comment on printers. Many questions as always, and a report of problems installing the Software Center.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 801

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU/Linux on ARM, GNU World Order and Linux Action News

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  • How usable is desktop Linux on ARM?
  • gnuWorldOrder_13x12
  • Linux Action News 97

    We try out the latest GNOME 3.32 release, and why it might be the best release ever. New leader candidates for Debian emerge, we experience foundation inception, and NGINX is getting acquired.

    Plus Android Q gets an official Desktop Mode, the story behind the new Open Distro for Elasticsearch, and more!

New Red Team Project Aims to Help Secure Open Source Software

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OSS

I founded the Fedora Red Team SIG with some fellow Red Hatters at Def Con 25. We had some exploit mapping tools that we wanted to build, and I was inspired by Mudge and Sarah Zatko’s Cyber-ITL project; I wanted to make an open source implementation of their methodologies. The Fedora Project graciously hosted us and were tremendous advocates. Now that I’m at Google, I’m fortunate to get to work on the Red Team as my 20% Project, where I hope to broaden its impact and build a more vendor neutral community. Fedora is collaborating with LF, supports our forking the projects, and will have a representative on our technical steering committee.

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Audiocasts: Linux Journal, Command Line Heroes, mintCast and This Week in Linux (TWIL)

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Interviews
  • Episode 16: Digital Stalking

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk about digital stalking, journalism, clickbait, and using ad targeting for evil.

  • What making a podcast taught us about branded content

    The Command Line Heroes podcast is best described as branded content. Branded content is a type of content marketing where companies raise awareness and build brand affinity by creating content that’s valuable, useful, and does not interrupt the lives of our audiences.

    Branded content like Command Line Heroes supports our company identity. It establishes Red Hat’s commitment to preserving and growing the open source movement and benefits both communities and enterprises.

  • mintCast 304 – Interview with Joshua Lowe
  • Episode 58 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux. We talk about the latest release of man-pages 5.0, Wireshark 3.0, Minetest 5.0, DAV1D video decoder and more. We also will cover some new distro releases with Pardus, 4MLinux, and Condres OS. We’ll also talk about some Linux Mobile news with Maru OS and Purism’s PureOS. Later in the show, we’ll discuss some unfortunate news regarding Microsoft potentially ending support for Skype for Web on Linux and Europe might be introducing some terrible regulations regarding firmware. Then we’ll end on a positive note by rounding out the show with some Linux Gaming news like a new Free to Play game and some new Humble Bundles. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews.

Videos: SwagArch 19.03, This Week in Linux, BSD Now

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Reviews
BSD
  • SwagArch 19.03 Run Through

    In this video, we look at SwagArch 19.03. Enjoy!

  • Episode 57 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, every now and then we cover something from the project that this show gets its name from and this is one of those weeks so we’ll discuss the release of Linux 5.0. Then we’ll cover some other releases from LineageOS, NuTyX, Fatdog64, Linux from Scratch and some more core news with releases from the WINE and Vulkan projects. Later in the show, we’ll check out some App News from OBS Studio, Headset Music Player, BorgBackup, a couple desktop weather apps, one with a GUI and the other for the terminal. All that and much more, this is your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Turing Complete Sed | BSD Now 288

    Software will never fix Spectre-type bugs, a proof that sed is Turing complete, managed jails using Bastille, new version of netdata, using grep with /dev/null, using GMail with mutt, and more.

Audiocasts: Linux Unplugged, FLOSS Weekly, The Linux Link Tech Show

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Interviews
  • Dirty Home Directories | LINUX Unplugged 291

    We reveal all and look at the mess that is our home directories. How we keep them clean, back them up, and organize our most important files.

    Plus Gnome lands a long awaited feature, Firefox gets a bit more clever, and the big money being made on Open Source.

  • FLOSS Weekly 520: Magalix

    Magalix eliminates the complexity of balancing performance with infrastructure capacity, using AI. It is a low-touch service that makes infrastructure self-healing to deliver the maximum value.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 798

New Video/Audio: Fedora 30 Wallpapers Slideshow, Archman 2019.02 "GNOME" Overview, Debunking Five Common Linux Myths and GNU World Order

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Linux
Interviews

Audiocasts: NetBSD, Linux in the Ham Shack, Proper Password Procedures and Red Hat Openwashing

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Indie Makers Using Single-Board Computers

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Linux
Interviews

Two such projects have really caught my attention lately: the Noodle Pi and the TinyPi.

The Noodle Pi is a simple, handheld computer (about the size of a deck of playing cards). And, when I say simple, I mean simple. It's got a micro-USB charging port, another for plugging in USB devices, a touch screen and a battery. Think of it like an old-school PDA without any buttons (other than a small power toggle) and the ability to run a full Linux-based desktop.

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Audiocasts: Full Circle Weekly News, FLOSS Weekly, GeekRant and LINUX Unplugged

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Interviews
  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #123
  • FLOSS Weekly 519: Aion

    Matthew Spoke is the founder of Aion, a world-leading blockchain protocol designed to solve the most prevalent challenges limiting blockchains mainstream adoption: scalability, interoperability and governance. Matt serves as CEO of the Aion Foundation. Prior to his current role, Matt founded Deloitte's first blockchain team, Rubix. Matt is an active and founding board member of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance and a founding director of the Blockchain Technology Coalition of Canada.

  • GeekRant #350 - Milestones, Monuments and Merriment

    The guys talks about the importance of breaking long-term goals into short-term milestones, celebrating big victories, and having fun along your financial journey.

  • Proper Pi Pedigree | LINUX Unplugged 290

    We head to the Raspberry Pi corner and pick the very best open source home automation system.

    Plus some great news for Gnome users, OBS studio has a new funding model, and a nostalgic chat with our study buddy Kenny.

    Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar, Brent Gervais, and Martin Wimpress.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Software: Relational Databases, Low Footprint Web Browsers and Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing

  • 10 Excellent Free Linux Relational Databases
    A relational database matches data using common characteristics found within the data set. The resulting groups of data are organized and are much easier for people to understand. In such a database the data and relations between them are organized in tables. A table is a collection of records and each record in a table contains the same fields. Certain fields may be designated as keys, which means that searches for specific values of that field will use indexing to speed them up. The term relational database was originally defined by Edgar Codd, a British computer scientist, whilst working at IBM Almaden Research Center. He recognized that the concept of a relational database could be derived from the principles of relational algebra and relational calculus. A Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) is a Database Management System (DBMS) that is based on the relational model. Most database systems today are based on this type of system. A database is a vital system for any organization that stores mission critical information. The continual failure of a company’s database system can only lead to the demise of the organization – companies cannot do business without a working database system. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 10 open source RDBMS. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to store data in an efficient way.
  • 10 Best lightweight browsers for Linux or Ubuntu
    Web Browsers, the day when they started making our lives easier by allowing us to crawl the internet to today’s world; they have been gone through numerous technological advancements. Browsers are quite advance to handle high-end graphics, online videos, apps and more without the help of third-party software. But this also has made them heavy in terms of consuming hardware resources, means more RAM and storage space. Such kind of browsers works well on good system configuration machines, however, Linux operating systems those are running on old PC or laptops or low configuration systems require light browsers with a minimal approach to work fast. Mainstream browser or shall I say the dominated one: Google Chrome that Linux users refrain themselves from instaling it on their machines is rather resourced consuming browser. This is the main reason why most of the Linux OS like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Centos and more come with Firefox Mozilla but somewhere it still not that much lightweight as we need it to be. So, I have done some research and gathered some lightweight Linux browsers.
  • TenFourFox FPR13 SPR1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 13 Security Parity Release 1 ("FPR13.1") is now available and live (downloads, hashes, release notes). The Pwn2Own vulnerabilities do not work on TenFourFox in their present form (not only because we're PowerPC but also because of our hybrid-endian typed arrays and other differences), but I have determined that TenFourFox-specific variant attacks could be exploitable, so we are patched as well. This should also reduce the risk of crashes from attempts to exploit mainline x86 Firefox. Meanwhile, H.264 support for TenFourFox FPR14 appears to be sticking. Yes, folks: for the first time you can now play Vimeo and other H.264-only videos from within TenFourFox using sidecar ffmpeg libraries, and it actually works pretty well! Kudos to Olga for the integration code! That said, however, it comes with a couple significant caveats. The first is that while WebM video tends not to occur in large numbers on a given page, H.264 videos nowadays are studded everywhere (Vimeo's front page, Twitter threads, Imgur galleries, etc.) and sometimes try to autoplay simultaneously. In its first iteration this would cause the browser to run out of memory if a large number of higher resolution videos tried to play at once, and sometimes crash when an infallible memory allocation fallibled. Right now there is a lockout in the browser to immediately halt all H.264 decoding if any instance runs out of memory so that the browser can save itself, but this needs a lot more testing to make sure it's solid, and is clearly a suboptimal solution. Remember that we are under unusual memory constraints because of the large amount of stack required for our JIT.
  • Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing
    Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing. Keeping in mind that not all Linux apps for writing are created equal nor do they each provide the same functionality. Today I’ll provide you with my top five Linux app picks for writing.

End of LibrePlanet 2019

  • Questioning and Finding Purpose
    This is copied over from my spiritual blog. I'm nervous doing that, especially at a point when I'm more vulnerable than usual in the Debian community. Still, this is who I am, and I want to be proud of that rather than hide it. And Debian and the free software community are about far more than just the programs we write. So hear goes: The Libreplanet opening keynote had me in tears. It was a talk by Dr. Tarek Loubani. He described his work as an emergency physician in Gaza and how 3d printers and open hardware are helping save lives. They didn't have enough stethoscopes; that was one of the critical needs. So, they imported a 3d printer, used that to print another 3d printer, and then began iterative designs of 3d-printable stethoscopes. By the time they were done, they had a device that performed as well or better than than a commercially available model. What was amazing is that the residents of Gaza could print their own; this didn't introduce dependencies on some external organization. Instead, open/free hardware was used to help give people a sense of dignity, control of some part of their lives, and the ability to better save those who depended on them. Even more basic supplies were unavailable. The lack of tourniquets caused the death of some significant fraction of casualties in the 2014 war. The same solution—3d-printed tourniquets had an even more dramatic result. Dr. Loubani talked about how he felt powerless to change the world around him. He talked about how he felt like an insignificant ant.
  • LibrePlanet Day 2: Welcoming everyone to the world of free software
    One of the most important questions that free software is facing in the year 2019 is: how do we make the world of free software accessible to broader audiences? Vast numbers of people are using software every day -- how do we relate our message to something that is important to them, and then welcome them into our community? In order to achieve our mission, we need to invite people and get them to use, create, and proliferate ethical software, until it replaces until all technology is free. Many of the best talks at LibrePlanet 2019 echoed a message for the free software community to focus on building a culture that's respectful and encouraging for new people, respecting a wide variety of personalities and values. The first way to get people invested in the culture of free software is to make it fun, and that was the focus of the morning keynote, "Freedom is fun!", delivered by free software veteran Bdale Garbee. A prominent name in the free software world for decades, Bdale talked about how he has a habit of turning all of his hobbies into free software projects, starting with model rockets.

Python Programming: PyPy 7.1 and More

  • PyPy v7.1 released; now uses utf-8 internally for unicode strings
    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the double release. This release, coming fast on the heels of 7.0 in February, finally merges the internal refactoring of unicode representation as UTF-8. Removing the conversions from strings to unicode internally lead to a nice speed bump. We merged the utf-8 changes to the py3.5 branch (Python3.5.3) but will concentrate on 3.6 going forward. We also improved the ability to use the buffer protocol with ctype structures and arrays.
  • PyPy 7.1 As The Well Known Alternative Python Implementation
    Last month brought the release of PyPy 7.0 as the JIT-ed performance-optimized Python implementation. PyPy 7.0 brought alpha Python 3.6 support, an updated CFFI module, and other enhancements. Out now is PyPy 7.1 as its successor.
  • Python’s “else” clause for loops
  • EuroPython 2019: Presenting our conference logo for Basel
    The logo is inspired by graphical elements from the Basel Jean Tinguely Museum and Basel Rhine Swimming. It was again created by our designer Jessica Peña Moro from Simétriko, who had already helped us in previous years with the conference design.