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Interviews

Audiocasts: Kubecon, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With YottaDB

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Interviews
  • Keeping up with Kubernetes | TechSNAP 392

    A security vulnerability in Kubernetes causes a big stir, but we’ll break it all down and explain what went wrong.

    Plus the biggest stories out of Kubecon, and serverless gets serious.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 787
  • FLOSS Weekly 510: YottaDB

    A lifelong hacker and geek, K.S. Bhaskar has been programming for almost half a century, and as a consequence of the technology gap between India and the US when he was an undergraduate, has programmed computers designed in the 1950s. He spent many years in the electronic test and measurement, and scientific computing worlds before moving to databases and the predecessor of YottaDB. He led GT.M, the predecessor of YottaDB from 1995 to 2017, before founding YottaDB in 2017 to take that code base – which by then felt to him like one of his children – to new markets and applications.

    Christopher is a true geek, and from a young start always wondered how the world works. He knew from a young age the computer field is where he was going to wind up working due to the infinite ways they could be used and cool things they could be made to do. Christopher has spent time in the healthcare industry working with YottaDB/GT.M/M and applying modern software development techniques to it. He also is a maker with more Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, other development boards, along with a 3d printer to keep himself busy.

Audiocasts: LINUX Unplugged and More

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Interviews

Audiocasts: Linux Action News, OpenBSD in Stereo, GNU World Order, Coder Radio and Open Source Security Podcast

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  • Linux Action News 83

    Plus the Kernel team’s clever Spectre slowdown fix, Emby goes proprietary, Steam Link lives on, and more.

  • OpenBSD in Stereo | BSD Now 275

    DragonflyBSD 5.4 has been released, down the Gopher hole with OpenBSD, OpenBSD in stereo with VFIO, BSD/OS the best candidate for legally tested open source Unix, OpenBGPD adds diversity to the routing server landscape, and more.

  • GNU World Order

    More listener email about ZFS. Noise music. More about workflows, and how to find the right application for your task.

  • Coder Radio 334

    Mike and Chris don’t claim to have a time machine, but they still have a major problem to solve.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 126 - The not so dire future of supply chain security

    Josh and Kurt continue the discussion from episode 125. We look at the possible future of software supply chains. It's far less dire than previously expected.

Audiocasts: Ubuntu Podcast and Destination Linux

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  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E39 – The Thirty-Nine Steps

    This week we’ve been flashing devices and getting a new display. We discuss Huawei developing its own mobile OS, Steam Link coming to the Raspberry Pi, Epic Games laucnhing their own digital store and we round up the community news.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 39 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Destination Linux EP99 - ASCII And You Shall Receive

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some distro news with VyOS & Fedora. We have great follow up regarding the kernel performance killer news we discussed last week. Some very big updates are coming from great software projects like Blender & Kodi. Later in the show, we check out some of Zeb’s favourite type of games! We also talk about the Plasma Mobile related news from Necuno Solutions. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With OpenVPN

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Talks/Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack. Linux Plumbers Conference, This Week in Linux, Linux Action News

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  • LHS Episode #261: The Weekender XX

    Welcome to Episode #261 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this, our 20th Weekender edition, we give you information on upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, upcoming open-source conferences and events, personal challenges, Linux distributions to try and a whole bunch of hedonism. It's the perfect intro to your next two weekends. Thank you for listening.

  • Open source compute stack talk from Linux Plumbers Conference 2018

    I spoke at Linux Plumbers Conference 2018 in Vancouver a few weeks ago, about CUDA and the state of open source compute stacks.

  • Episode 45 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we follow up on the Kernel Performance issues we discussed last week. There may be a new contender in the Mobile market using Plasma Mobile. We’ll also check out some distro news from Fedora, BlackArch and Intel’s Clear Linux. A lot of exciting App News was released this week for upcoming releases to Blender, Kodi., and more. Later in the show, we’ll check out a new game from Valve and some Security News. All that and much more!

  • Linux Action News 82

    Clear Linux doubles down on the desktop, Fedora 31 is likely canceled or delayed, and why Firecracker is being called the new “Docker killer”.

Audiocasts: FLOSS Weekly, Linux Link Tech Show and Linux Journal

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Audio: Skipping Fedora 31, "Linux Sucks" and More

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  • Skipping Fedora 31 | LINUX Unplugged 277

    Fedora might take a year off, to focus on it self. Project Lead and Council Chair Matthew Miller joins us to explain this major proposal.

    Plus Wimpy shares his open source Drobo alternative, and our final Dropbox XFS hack.

    Special Guests: Brent Gervais, Martin Wimpress, and Matthew Miller.

  • Linux Sucks. Forever.
  • Let your geek flag fly

    Myles and Mark talk about being intentional with your life instead of letting your life happen to you.

Audiocasts/Shows: Using Calibre To Keep Your Digital Library and Linux Action News 81

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  • Using Calibre To Keep Your Digital Library In Order with Kovid Goyal - Episode 187

    Digital books are convenient and useful ways to have easy access to large volumes of information. Unfortunately, keeping track of them all can be difficult as you gain more books from different sources. Keeping your reading device synchronized with the material that you want to read is also challenging. In this episode Kovid Goyal explains how he created the Calibre digital library manager to solve these problems for himself, how it grew to be the most popular application for organizing ebooks, and how it works under the covers. Calibre is an incredibly useful piece of software with a lot of hidden complexity and a great story behind it.

  • Linux Action News 81

    The Fuchsia bomb ticks closer, Valve’s Steam Link end of life shocks us, and Amazon’s new, rather obvious feature.

    Plus the surprise use for Red Hat Enterprise, and an update on the Linux powered Atari VCS.

Audiocasts: Linux Action News and Deconstructed Dialog

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Interviews
  • Linux Action News 80

    Mark Shuttleworth announced 10 years support of Ubuntu 18.04, but there’s a catch. Why we’re buying the new Raspberry Pi, and we have a laugh at folding Android screens.

    Plus the new Red Hat Enterprise beta has modularity, why Canonical might be ready for investors, and the bad week for cryptocurrencies.

  • Deconstructed Dialog | User Error 53

    There's something almost intangible about the way Linux presents itself and Popey tries to explain it, the balance between living for the moment and planning for the future, and doing it wrong with social media.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Watchdog: IRS botched Linux migration

Poor IT governance prevented the IRS from making progress on a long-term effort to migrate 141 legacy applications from proprietary vendor software to open source Linux operating systems, according to an audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Under a migration plan developed in 2014, two-thirds of targeted applications and databases were supposed to have been successfully migrated by December 2016. However, only eight of the 141 applications targeted have successfully transitioned to Linux as of February 2018. More than one third have not even started. Read more

Graphics: Wayland's Weston, AMD, GitLab, NVIDIA

  • Wayland's Weston Switching Over To The Meson Build System
    Complementing the Meson build system support for Wayland itself, the Weston reference compositor now has been Meson-ized. Pekka Paalanen and Daniel Stone, both of Collabora, have landed the Meson build system support for the Weston compositor. At this stage the new build system should be fully working and correct.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets Polaris Corruption Fix, Some Code Refactoring
    AMD has published their latest batch of "DC" Display Core patches for the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver. This batch of 45 patches against this display code for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver has some code cleanups and refactoring, changes some error messages to just warnings, and has a display corruption fix affecting some Polaris hardware.
  • Investigating GitLab
    The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) kernel subsystem is a fairly small part of the kernel, he said. It is also a fairly small part of the open-source graphics stack, which is under the X.Org umbrella. DRM sits in the middle between the two, so the project has learned development tools and workflows from both of the larger projects. The kernel brought DRM into the Git world in 2006, which was just a year after Git came about; it was a "rough ride" back then, Vetter said. With Git came "proper commit messages". Prior to that, the X.org commit messages might just be a single, unhelpful line; now those messages explain why the change is being made and what it does. The idea of iterating on a patch series on the mailing list came from the kernel side as did the "benevolent dictator" model of maintainership. DRM, the X server, Wayland, and others all followed that model along the way. From the X.Org side came things like the committer model; in Mesa, every contributor had commit rights. That model has swept through the graphics community, so now DRM, the X server, and Wayland are all run using that scheme. Testing and continuous integration (CI) is something that DRM has adopted from X.Org; the kernel also does this, but DRM has adopted the X.Org approach, tooling, and test suites. For historical reasons, "almost everything" is under the MIT license, which comes from X.Org projects as well. There has been a lot of movement of tools and development strategies in both directions via the DRM subsystem. He thinks that using GitLab may be "the next big wave of changes" coming from the user-space side to kernel graphics, and maybe to the kernel itself eventually. This won't happen this year or next year, Vetter predicted, but over the next few years we will see GitLab being used more extensively.
  • AMDGPU For Linux 4.20 Gets The Final Radeon RX 590 Fix, Adds The New Vega PCI IDs
    With just over one week to go until the expected Linux 4.20 kernel release, Alex Deucher of AMD today sent in the latest batch of fixes to the DRM tree for landing at the end of this cycle. Notable about this latest set of "fixes" for the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver are: - The final Radeon RX 590 fix so this newer Polaris GPU no longer hangs under load. So once this Linux 4.20 material is merged to mainline, this month-old Polaris graphics card should now be happily running on Linux -- assuming you also have the latest Polaris firmware files and a recent version of Mesa. See our Radeon RX 590 benchmarks article for more details.
  • AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4 Driver Update Brings Performance Improvements, New Vulkan Bits
    AMD developers today outed their latest "AMDVLK" open-source Vulkan driver code drop dubbed AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4.
  • NVIDIA 415.23 Driver Fixes Build Issues Against Linux 4.20 Kernel
    The NVIDIA 415.23 driver was issued just to fix a build issue against the near-final Linux 4.20 kernels. In particular, there has been a build failure around the vm_insert_pfn function that is now worked around when building the NVIDIA proprietary driver's shim against the Linux 4.20 release candidates.
  • NVIDIA Now Shipping The Jetson AGX Xavier Module
    NVIDIA has been shipping the Jetson AGX Xavier Developer Kit the past few months while now they are beginning to ship the AGX Xavier Module intended for use in next-generation autonomous machines.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage)

  • 2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members
    Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board. The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is Generally Available
    SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is now generally available. Service Pack 4 marks the fourth generation of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, a major code stream and product foundation with a lifecycle from 2014 to 2024 plus Long Term Support (10+3 years). This release consolidates all fixes and updates introduced since SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3.
  • Making the Selection
    You’ve likely read or heard a lot about today’s data explosion and how it’s affecting enterprises. After combing through all the overexcited rhetoric about how quickly data is multiplying or how many petabytes you’ll soon have to handle, one thing remains clear: You need to find a new way to store and manage your data or you’ll get left behind. While that mandate puts pressure on your organization to act quickly, it’s also the catalyst to a whole new world of exciting opportunities. More data can mean deeper, more accurate insights into your operations and customer needs, which empowers you to streamline processes and personalize experiences like never before. More data can also lead to greater innovation and new sources of revenue.