Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interviews

Git Success Stories and Tips from Tor Chief Architect Nick Mathewson

Filed under
Development
Interviews
OSS

Tor, the free and open source software for anonymous web communications, has been using the Git revision control system for more than six years. The tool is so ingrained in the project's development that Director and Chief Architect Nick Mathewson's daily work flow is built around Git, he says.

“Git's the eighth version control system I've had to use, and the first one I've seriously trusted,” Mathewson said. “Many thanks to the Git developers for all their hard work.”

Read more

Interview with Elizabeth K. Joseph of the Ubuntu Community Council

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

I work as a systems administrator and frequently write and speak about my work in that role. My current position is with HP on the OpenStack Project Infrastructure where we maintain dozens of static systems that developers interface with for their work on OpenStack and a fleet of hundreds of worker servers that run all of the tests that are done against the code before it’s merged. This infrastructure is fully open source, with all of our system configurations, Puppet tooling and projects we used available via git here. Since I have a passion for both systems administration and open source, it’s been quite the dream job for me as I work with colleagues from around the world, across several companies.

Read more

OpenDaylight Developer Spotlight: Radhika Hirannaiah

Filed under
Development
Interviews

Radhika Hirannaiah, is currently working as an intern at OpenDaylight. She received a PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Wichita State University in 2014. Her interests include Software Defined Networking (OpenFlow, OpenDaylight etc), Voice over IP, wireless and working on open source software projects.

Read more

Git Success Stories and Tips from Qt Maintainer Thiago Macieira

Filed under
Development
KDE
Interviews

Git has come a long way in the 10 years since Linux creator Linus Torvalds released the first version of the now-popular distributed revision control system. For example, the addition of pull requests came three years after the original release, according to Atlassian. And over time it has added more collaboration tools, code review tools, integration to continuous integration systems, and more, recalls Qt Project core maintainer and software architect at Intel, Thiago Macieira.

Read more

The Linux Setup - Carla Schroder, OwnCloud/Writer

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I adore Linux because I can do what I want on it. My first PC way back in 1994ish was an Apple something. It was fun, and then I got an IBM PC running Windows 3,1 and DOS 5. Windows was useless, so I spent a lot of time in DOS. Then I learned about Linux and never looked back. And Windows is still useless, and Apple is too confining. They both have their little walled gardens, and their primary purpose is lock-in and to keep selling you junk whether you want it or not, and whether or not it’s any good. They think they retain ownership of your stuff that you have purchased, which is a concept that needs to die.

Read more

How I use Android: Android Wear Engineering Director David Singleton

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Google's own director of engineering for Android Wear gives us a glimpse at what devices he carries, how he sets up his home screens, and what apps he can't live without.

Read more

Studying polar data with the help of Apache Tika

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

For the past 10 years, I have straddled the divide between Earth science and informatics. My PhD focused on remote sensing and snow hydrology, but I entered the world of data science and software development when faced by challenges in processing and distributing the immense amounts of data produced by my research. Fortunately, I was lucky. I had the opportunity to collaborate with a group of computer scientists at NASA/JPL who helped guide me into the world of open source software and the Apache way.

Read more

11 Ways That Linux Contributes to Tech Innovation

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Over the past six months I've asked new Linux Foundation corporate members on the cutting edge of technology to weigh in on what interesting or innovative trends they're witnessing and the role that Linux plays in them. Here's what engineers, CTOs, and other business leaders from companies including CoreOS, Rackspace, SanDisk, and more had to say.

Read more

Netflix has more than 50 open source projects

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

My team has become very fond of an open source tool called Browserify. It was originally designed to allow the Node.js modules to be used in the browser, but we’ve leveraged it as the primary component in our build process. Over the last year, it has helped us to turn our monolithic code into a set of independent, maintainable modules. Previously, we were concatenating a big file and maintaining subsystem independence using namespaces, so this has been a big change for us.

Read more

Q&A: Ulf Lundgren on how open source is just the ticket

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

I think that open source technology has a bright future as more and more people realise the true value of a service. That value is not in the products anymore, but rather in what vendors can provide in terms of services, knowledge and manpower. Also, we feel it is more fun and more rewarding when you have the power to choose freely how to work and what tools to use to reach your goal. This isn't always an option in a closed source environment.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more