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Interviews

Audiocasts/Show: TLLTS, FLOSS Weekly, BSD Now, mintCast, Talk Python

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Interviews
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 824
  • FLOSS Weekly 545: PyPI Security

    The Python Package Index (PyPI) is a repository of software for the Python programming language. PyPI helps you find and install software developed and shared by the Python community.

  • Swap that Space | BSD Now 314

    Unix virtual memory when you have no swap space, Dsynth details on Dragonfly, Instant Workstation on FreeBSD, new servers new tech, Experimenting with streaming setups on NetBSD, NetBSD’s progress towards Steam support thanks to GSoC, and more.

  • mintCast 316.5 – Dive Into Leo
  • Episode #228: Hunting bugs and tech startups with Python

    What's it's like building a startup with Python and going through a tech accelerator? You're about to find out. On this episode, you'll meet Elissa Shevinsky from Faster Than Light. They are building a static code analysis as a service business for Python and other code bases. We touch on a bunch of fun topics including static code analysis, entrepreneurship, and tech accelerators.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Lite 4.6, Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, Going Linux

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Interviews

Krita Interview with Wojtek Trybus

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KDE
Interviews

It was 2015, I guess, when I read about it on David Revoy’s blog for the first time – I suppose many artists switched from GIMP to Krita somewhere in that time because of his support to the program.

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Lars Knoll, CTO at Qt and Keynote Speaker at Akademy 2019

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Development
KDE
Interviews

Paul Brown: Hello Lars, how are you this morning? You seem very busy...

Lars Knoll: Hi Paul, I'm doing good. There's more than enough to do, but I had a good weekend.

Paul: Great! So tell me a bit about yourself. Looking over your résumé, you seem to have been in software production forever. Is this something you always wanted to do, since you were young?

Lars: No, not really. Of course I played around with computers a bit when I was young. I had a Commodore 64 back then, but I mostly used it for games.

I actually went and studied physics when I went to University, and had quite a few years where I did very little with computers.

Things started picking up again during my masters and PhD thesis time in Heidelberg. I needed to use computers a lot to analyze the data that we collected during our experiments. We used Linux computers and Unix machines at that time, and I had to do quite a bit of my programming in Fortran. I really didn't like that language, so I started teaching myself C and some C++ to have a better language to work with. That was around 1996, 1997, if I remember correctly.

At that time, I also read about KDE for the first time, as a project to create a Desktop for Linux. That was something that also triggered my interest, and I started looking into it a bit and started subsequently to use it, as it was way easier than FVWM which is what I was using before.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, Linux Action News, SMLR/Detroit Linux and GNU World Order

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Interviews
  • Crystal Clear | Coder Radio 372

    We're back and going crazy about Crystal, a statically typed language that's as fast as C and as slick as ruby.

    Plus an update on Rails 6, Intel's growing adoption of Rust, and the challenge of making breaking changes.

  • Linux Action News 120

    More tools to keep your Linux box and cloud servers secure this week, OpenPOWER responds to Risc-V competition, and we ponder the year-long open-source supply chain attacks.

    Plus our reaction to Android dropping dessert names, the Confidential Computing consortium, and more.

  • SMLR 31# Detroit Linux
  • GNU World Order 13x35

FreeBSD Meets Linux At The Open Source Summit

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Interviews
BSD

The Linux Foundation hosted the executive director of the FreeBSD Foundation, Deb Goodkin, at the Open Source Summit in San Diego. In this episode of Let’s Talk, we sat down with Goodkin to talk about the FreeBSD project and the foundation.

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Meet the GNOMEies: Max Huang

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Interviews
GNOME

Max Huang has been GNOME since 2010, starting with forming a GNOME users group in Taiwan. Max has a story you may understand: being a user, meeting the right person, and slowly finding yourself more and more deeply involved with a community in terms of working together and making friends.

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Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, TLLTS, BSD Now, Choose Linux and Matt Layman

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Interviews
  • mintCast 315.5 – On OggCamp with Les and Dan

    In the second half, we interview Dan and Les about OggCamp and get more than we bargained for.

    Then, in our security update, we talk about how Chrome’s Incognito mode can be detected.

    Finally, we share feedback and point out a few things we found interesting this fortnight.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 822
  • Why Package Managers | BSD Now 312

    Valuable research is often hindered or outright prevented by the inability to install software. This need not be the case.

  • PCLinuxOS + Hugo | Choose Linux 16

    We check out a great tool for learning web development basics, and Distrohoppers brings us mixed experiences.

    Plus which of the 10 commandments for Linux users we agree with.

  • Celery In A Shiv App - Building SaaS #31

    In this episode, we baked the Celery worker and beat scheduler tool into the Shiv app. This is one more step on the path to simplifying the set of tools on the production server.

    I started the stream by reviewing the refactoring that I did to conductor/main.py. The main file is used to dispatch to different tools with the Shiv bundle.

Audiocasts/Shows: Jupiter (Linux Academy) and TLLTS

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Sliding Politics and PyBites

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Interviews
  • LHS Episode #297: The Weekender XXXII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Sliding Politics | User Error 72

    Dealing with users who hate change, dumb phones, and different approaches to social media consumption.

    Plus infidelity, the state of the world, and consequences of small decisions.

  • Test and Code: 83: PyBites Code Challenges behind the scenes - Bob Belderbos

    Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira started PyBites a few years ago.
    They started doing code challanges along with people around the world and writing about it.

    Then came the codechalleng.es platform, where you can do code challenges in the browser and have your answer checked by pytest tests. But how does it all work?

    Bob joins me today to go behind the scenes and share the tech stack running the PyBites Code Challenges platform.

    We talk about the technology, the testing, and how it went from a cool idea to a working platform.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: DXVK, Nouveau

  • DXVK 1.4 Released With Updates Against Direct3D 11.4, Other Improvements

    In time for any weekend gaming is the release of DXVK 1.4 as the latest big update to this Direct3D 11 over Vulkan implementation to boost the D3D11 Windows gaming performance with the likes of Wine and Valve's Steam Play (Proton). With DXVK 1.4 the Direct3D interfaces have been updated against D3D11.4, the latest D3D11 revision shipped by Windows 10 Build 1903. This update brings new API features but DXVK isn't yet supporting some of the optional features like tiled resources and conservative rasterization.

  • Nouveau Finally Lands SPIR-V Support As Part Of OpenCL Push

    Going back to December 2017 we've been tracking the Red Hat led effort on improving Nouveau's OpenCL compute support that involves adding NIR/SPIR-V support and improvements to the Clover Gallium3D state tracker. To much surprise, this morning the SPIR-V support for this open-source NVIDIA driver was merged for Mesa 19.3.

Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

At just 37mm tall, the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 is one of the shortest yet quite capable CPU heatsink fans we have seen yet for AMD Ryzen processors. When looking for a heatsink with a small stature for an AMD APU mini PC build for HTPC / file storage use-cases (more on that build in the next day or two), the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 fit the criteria and so I went with that given the success with the many Noctua heatsinks we have used over the years. For those potentially interested in the NH-L9a-AM4 for an AMD APU like the new Ryzen 5 3400G or for lower-end Ryzen CPUs, I ran some benchmarks with this cooler. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • Codementor: Can We Do Machine Learning without python, absolutely No... Read this...

    Python has become, go programming language Around the World. From many Software companies to Consumer-based Companies.

  • Code it, ship it, own it with full-service ownership

    Software teams seeking to provide better products and services must focus on faster release cycles. But running reliable systems at ever-increasing speeds presents a big challenge. Software teams can have both quality and speed by adjusting their policies around ongoing service ownership. While on-call plays a large part in this model, advancement in knowledge, more resilient code, increased collaboration, and better practices mean engineers don't have to wake up to a nightmare. This four-part series will delve into the concepts of full-service ownership, psychological safety in transformation, the ethics of accountability, and the impact of ownership on the customer experience.

  • ML with Python: Part-1

    Now, We are comfortable with Python and ready to get started with Machine Learning (ML) projects. But, Where to go next? Can we directly dive into coding ML projects? Please follow along to know the answer.....

  • Simple rules of good programming

    Hi guys, I work as a programmer for more than 15 years and was using many different languages, paradigms, frameworks and other shit. And I want to share with you my rules of writing good code. [...] Code review can be as good as it can be bad. You can organize code review only if you have a developer who understand 95% of the code and who can monitor all updates without wasting to much time. In another situation, it will be just time consuming and everyone will hate this. On this part got too many questions so describe this more deeply. Many people think that code review it’s a good way of teaching new guys, or teammates who work on a different part of code. But the main target of code review it’s maintaining code quality, and not teaching. Let’s imagine that your team making code for controlling a cooling system for nuclear reactor, or space rocket engine. And you made huge mistake in very hard logic, and then you are giving this for code review to the new guy. How do you think what would be the risk of an accident? — On my practice more than 70%. A good team is where each person has own role and responsibility for the exact piece of work. If someone wants to understand another piece of code then he goes to a person responsible for it and asks her. Impossible to know everything and better excellent understand a small piece of code than all but on 30%.

  • Hone advanced Bash skills by building Minesweeper

    I am no expert on teaching programming, but when I want to get better at something, I try to find a way to have fun with it. For example, when I wanted to get better at shell scripting, I decided to practice by programming a version of the Minesweeper game in Bash. If you are an experienced Bash programmer and want to hone your skills while having fun, follow along to write your own version of Minesweeper in the terminal. The complete source code is found in this GitHub repository.

  • Java 13 Delivers Features That Improve Productivity, Efficiency

    At its CodeOne conference, Oracle explains how the rapid release cycle for Java has yielded innovation, as Java SE 13 is officially launched.

  • A Novel About Java & Open Source – Meet The Author Of “Emmy In The Key Of Code”

    “Emmy in the Key of Code” is novel written by Aimee Lucido, a software engineer who works at Uber. It’s about Java and music. Oracle invited Lucido to speak at the Oracle OpenWorld/Code One event. We sat down with her to talk about her book and what inspired her to write it.

  • Intellectual property Law and Coding

    In the world of software, good code is a necessity, and great code can make the difference between a startup succeeding and failing. But how do you protect coding innovations that may be novel or unique? Intellectual property law, or IP law, is the main legalistic framework that can answer many of those questions and more. Any business, and perhaps more crucially, any individual coder, should be aware of their options when it comes to maintaining the rights to their work. Here, we delve into some of the most important things to know about IP law and coding.

LLVM 9.0.0 released

It's my great pleasure to announce that LLVM 9 is now available. Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#9.0.0 This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past six months (up to trunk r366426 plus commits on the branch). Some highlights include: - Support for asm goto, enabling for example the mainline Linux kernel for x86_64 to build with Clang - The RISCV-V target is no longer experimental, but built by default - Experimental support for C++ for OpenCL as well as many bug fixes, optimizations, and diagnostics improvements. Read more