Interviews

Interviews with various people, mostly in the FOSS world

DoodleBorg Interview

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

DoodleBorg is] running off six motorcycle starter motors. It’s using mini all-terrain vehicle wheels and has a custom chassis made out of six-millimetre thick steel that has been laser cut. It has two motorcycle batteries, and six of our wonderful PicoBorg reverse control boards which are capable of five amps per channel, ten amps in total. We’ve got them connected up, one per motor so we can individually control each of the wheels. This means we can make alternate wheels go in all sorts of directions if we want them to. There are some big crazy switches on the front that serve emergency power-offs too.

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The People Who Support Linux: Engineer Thanks Father for His Linux Career

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Software engineer Thomas Gibbons remembers from an early age working with his father to set up mail servers in their home in Kidderminster, England. His dad, Christopher Gibbons, a BT (British Telecom) engineer, was always eager to teach him about things he expressed interested in, he said via phone this week.

“He got me into programming as well. I'm where I am today because of my father's faith in me,” Gibbons said. “Whenever I wanted to learn something, he said 'Great, we'll learn it together.”

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Randa Meetings Interview One: Cristian Oneț

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

This is one of our first interviews with the excited attendees of the Randa meetings and today you shall get a glimpse into the mind, workings and makings of Cristian Oneț who has been with KDE since quite some time now and has been a prominent contributor.

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A responsibility to use the open source products we work on

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Red Hat
Interviews

It basically boils down to the fact that in the open source world, the majority of work is done on open source UNIX-like operating systems such as GNU/Linux, *BSD, and somewhat recently in the IllumOS space. Each of these options are solid choices for server-side use, with varying preferences on which is the best. I think the server market share in recent years is evidence of this. However, the desktop has kind of been the peak of the mountaintop that we've yet reached. In the past few years there's been an influx of people who I think have given up on the desktop, have put down their distro of choice, and picked up a Mac because it offers a UNIX-like work environment with a nice polished "out of box" experience. I don't think this is inherently wrong or evil, but I do think that we all owe it to ourselves, and to our community, to sit back and ask: "What is this $thing lacking that makes me not want to use it?" (Though most often that $thing is GNOME3, Unity, Cinnamon, MATE, KDE, or some distro that ships with the desktop by default.)

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Interviews: Bruce Perens Answers Your Questions

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Interviews
OSS

Microsoft eventually used SCO as a proxy to achieve what it disclosed to HP that day. I'd been warned long before that happened, and could do nothing until SCO announced their damaging but ultimately unsuccessful jihad against Linux.

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The Linux Setup - Sean Cross, Novena Developer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Interviews

I’m not a big hardware guy. At all. Specs mean very little to me. However, Sean’s hardware is interesting, as it’s a Novena, something he developed himself. And of course, because he’s working with Linux, he’s able to get things to run pretty well. I have no idea what the future of the Novena is, but I love that people can make new devices that will be able to access familiar software and interfaces. Microsoft is making Windows cost-free for certain devices. It’s a smarter strategy than charging manufacturers, but until they let people get under the hood of the code, they’re going to have a hard time reaching new, experimental devices. Which is actually OK with me, since I’m happy to have Linux in as many places as possible.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Rackspace

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Interviews

Rackspace has lately been in the news for its stock market gains and a potential acquisition. But over the past 16 years the company has become well known, first as a web hosting provider built on Linux and open source, and later as a pioneer of the open source cloud and founder of the OpenStack cloud platform.

In May, Rackspace became a Xen Project member and was one of three companies to join the Linux Foundation as a corporate member, along with CoreOS and Cumulus Networks.

“Many of the applications and infrastructure that we need to run for internal use or for customers run best on Linux,” said Paul Voccio, Senior Director of Software Development at Rackspace, via email. “This includes all the popular language frameworks and open virtualization platforms such as Xen, LXC, KVM, Docker, etc.”

In this Q&A, Voccio discusses the role of Rackspace in the cloud, how the company uses Linux, why they joined the Linux Foundation, as well as current trends and future technologies in the data center.

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OPENDAYLIGHT DEVELOPER SPOTLIGHT: LUIS GOMEZ

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Luis Gomez is Principal Software Test Engineer at Brocade and currently coordinates the Integration Group at OpenDaylight. Prior to this, Luis worked many years at Ericsson in end-to-end solution integration and verification for radio, fixed, core and transport functions...

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A Conversation With Linus Torvalds, Who Built The World's Most Robust Operating System And Gave It Away For Free

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

In 1991, 22-year old Finnish computer programmer Linus Torvalds released his own operating system. Opening with the message “Hello everybody out there,” (a now-iconic phrase among Linux fans), he posted the source code online. People alternately contributed their abilities to improve it where they could or went off to build their own things with it.

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RASPBERRY PI IN SCHOOLS

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Interviews

Two years ago, when the Raspberry Pi launched, it was with the intention of improving IT education in the UK. Since then more powerful, better connected or cheaper boards have come onto the market, but the Pi retains its position as the white knight of ICT teaching.
Why? Because of the community of users that has grown up around it. To find out more we travelled west to Manchester, venue for the second annual Jamboree – a festival of educators, makers and messer-abouters focussed on highlighting how engaging the Pi can be. There, we met 75% of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s education team – Ben Nuttall, Clive Beale and Carrie Anne Philbin – to discuss IT teaching in the UK.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Cumulus Networks

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux has already transformed data center economics on the server side, and Cumulus Networks is set to do it again – this time through the network. The company behind Cumulus Linux, the first distribution for data center switches and other networking hardware, is part of a broader enterprise movement toward open networking.

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Aber SailBot interview

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

The autonomous Raspberry Pi-powered robot yacht built by British students that competes worldwide

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Linus Torvalds reads mean tweets

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linus Torvalds has a great sense of humor (depending on your taste of humor), as long as you are not at the receiving end. But there is nothing funnier than him reading some tweets targeting him. The Linux Foundation has published a video where Linus is reading some tweets on the lines of Jimmy Kimmel’s Mean Tweets series.

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The Companies That Support Linux: CoreOS

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

As companies grow their data centers to accommodate more cloud services and applications, their resource management practices also grow increasingly complex. CoreOS is a new Linux distribution that uses containers to help manage these massive server deployments.

On May 19, CoreOS joined the Linux Foundation as a corporate member, along with Rackspace Hosting and Cumulus Networks. All three companies are playing a crucial role in the data center transformation and see open source as the lynchpin for optimal scalability, efficiencies, security and data center savings.

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TechView: Linus Torvalds, Inventor of Linux

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Linux
Interviews

That very much includes me, btw. I think the whole "cult of personality" is pretty disturbing, and I hate how people take me and what I say too seriously. The same goes for Jobs, Ellison, Gates, you name it. I wish more people thought for themselves, and realized that the technology actually flows from all those random anonymous great engineers that are all around.

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Terry Hancock on Free Software and Free Culture [Interview]

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Interviews

Advocates of Free Software aren’t made in a single night. When it comes to computers, software, and digital art, inspiration and motivation are of utmost importance. Terry Hancock, part owner of Anansi Spaceworks and Free Software Magazine columnist, was surrounded by all three growing up.

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Interview With Jennifer Cloer, Director of Communications at The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Jennifer Cloer

TUX MACHINES has caught up with Jennifer Cloer, who is the director of communications at The Linux Foundation. Our short interview focuses on Linux in devices and some of the existing challenges.


Tux Machines: As the growth of Linux accelerates, especially on devices, patent pressure intensifies. Short of patent reform, which is seemingly too slow to arrive, how can one counter threats to the zero-cost advantage of Linux?

Jennifer Cloer: Certainly, we have to be mindful of patent issues, as does anyone working in the software industry, whether they work on open source or proprietary software. It is an issue. But given the massive community that supports and depends on Linux, there are hundreds of companies and thousands of developers invested in Linux and prepared to defend the operating system every day.

TM: Android is becoming the de facto standard platform in several areas, but it is also the carrier of many proprietary apps. How do the mobile Linux platforms backed by the Linux Foundation distinguish themselves from this?

JC: The Linux Foundation supports and “backs” all Linux-based platforms. The more people building with Linux and contributing back to the kernel, the better for everyone. Platforms will distinguish themselves in a number of ways but that will be determined by the communities, developers and companies supporting those platforms.

TM: Short of lobbying, how can one help politicians or CIOs grasp the advantages of software that they have full control over?

JC: Governments and CIOs understand the advantages now more than ever. Governments around the world are embracing open source and have been for years now. CIOs are increasingly using Linux and open source as the building blocks for their enterprises, especially as the cloud has become so prominent. In our latest Enterprise End User Report, 80 percent of users said they would increase their use of Linux over the next five years; just 20 percent said they would increase their use of Windows during the same time period.

TM: The Linux Foundation recently organised events in Europe, including the UK. Are there plans of expanding such initiatives?

JC: The Linux Foundation hosts LinuxCon and CloudOpen in Europe every year. This year we’ll be in Dusseldorf October 13-15, 2014. We will continue to host other events in Europe, too, such as Embedded Linux Conference and KVM Forum. We’ll also host ApacheCon and CloudStack Conference in Europe in Budapest on November 17-21, 2014.

Richard Stallman Answers Your Questions

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

A few of the questions asked about "open source software" in such a way that, responding to them directly, I'd be classifying programs as "open" or "closed". That I will not do, because those terms presuppose a different philosophy based on different values.

Rather than give no answer to those questions, I modified them to say "free software" instead, and answered them that way. (Square brackets show these changes.) I hope the answers to these modified questions are of interest to readers. They are rather different from what an open source supporter would say.

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Ikey Doherty Talks Evolve OS & Budgie Desktop

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Interviews

Ikey Doherty is probably one of the most tech-smart people I know. Fact is, Ikey is much like that guy you hear about on the news, the guy that can hear a string of 4 digit numbers and tell you the sum of them in a couple of seconds. Now, I don’t know if Ikey is capable of that feat, but I do know what he can do.

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We still believe in Linus’ law after Heartbleed bug, says Elie Auvray of Jahia

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Today Jahia is the #1 Open Source alternative to proprietary CMS vendors for upper tier digital projects. Over the years, we’ve focused on building a content platform that delivers true technology convergence: business user and developers work in harmony to deploy digital projects (Portals, multichannel, multi site, Multilanguage corporate sites, extranets, intranets and even full digital applications) securely and seamlessly.

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