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Interviews

OSU Open Source Lab leader looks to further FOSS community outreach

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Interviews
OSS

I had a wonderful run at Google -- more than six years -- and decided it was time for a change of scene, both career-wise and geographically. I had worked extensively with the team at OSU's Open Source Lab during my time at Google and had consistently been impressed with their support of the open source community and their leadership in bringing open source into computer science education. My new role allows me to support both aspects of their mission, and I am very excited to join them.

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Tips on Scaling Open Source in the Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

I can summarize that in three points for application developers: a shorter learning curve, better security with less hassle, and more resources with increased agility.

First is the shortened learning curve. Developers just want to develop applications when they use open source. They want to focus on their particular application logic and they want to decide what features to develop. They do not want to spend time and effort on managing the physical infrastructure, an aggravation cloud computing eliminates.

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Young programmer turns love of gaming into a Google Summer of Code project

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Google
Interviews
Gaming

Recently I installed the GCompris educational software suite on a friend's Linux laptop. While researching information about the application, I found out about Rudra Nil Basu, a young programmer from India, who has blogged about his contributions to GCompris. Based on his work, he was selected to be a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) participant and will receive a stipend to continue working to improve GCompris.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Rudra some questions about how he's translating his passion for game development into making learning fun for young children and supporting open source software and source code sharing. Some questions and answers have been lightly edited for clarity.

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Riley Brandt: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Brandt was initially worried that he would have a more difficult time getting help when he was making the transition from Ubuntu to Fedora. “I was worried that since Fedora has a smaller user base than Ubuntu, I would have trouble getting support. But that wasn’t the case at all. Fedora users were quick to respond to my questions and full of useful info.”

His experience with the Fedora community helped him realize it should not just be the desktop environment or package manager that influences the decision on what distro to use. “Not enough people think about the community. Fedora’s community might be its biggest selling point.”

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Red Hat Interviews

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Red Hat
Interviews
  • Red Hat exec talks up new London 'innovation lab'
  • Red Hat exec talks open source strategies, innovation and VMware [iophk: "Free Software?"]

    So, even as things turn into 'products by vendors' or services through cloud, they're generally started with some sort of open source community. The only place where I think there's innovation going on [outside open source] would be some more niche areas, vertical applications where it just doesn't lend itself to broad open source contribution in communities. But I'd say most of the broad-based innovation taking place today starts with open source.

Mark Shuttleworth Reaffirms Commitment to Desktop, Canonical IPO Talk

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GNU
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Ubuntu on the Desktop Will Remain Important to Canonical

    The OpenStack Summit 2017 event kicked off today in Boston, MA, and Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth was there to discuss the upcoming plans for Ubuntu on the desktop, cloud computing, and IoT (Internet of Things).

    The Canonical and Ubuntu founder was interviewed there by theCUBE, who were very curious to know what is the state of Ubuntu Linux these days, now that Mark Shuttleworth shocked the Open Source community when he announced last month that development of the Unity interface is shut down, along with the convergence vision.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Says Ubuntu Desktop “Remains Really Important”

    Mark Shuttleworth has reiterated that the Ubuntu desktop “remains really important” to Canonical.

    He made the comments in an interview with The Cube at the OpenStack Summit 2017 taking place in the USA this week.

    Asked to describe the current state of Ubuntu following last month’s announcement that Canonical is to end investment in Ubuntu Phone, Unity 8, convergence, the Ubuntu founder admitted that Ubuntu ‘failed’ to take Ubuntu mainstream in personal computing.

  • My Current Ubuntu Desktop (And How You Can Recreate It)

    As you may have heard me mention in the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, I’ve been ankle deep in GNOME extensions these past few weeks. Why? Well, like many of you I have made a preëmptive switch to GNOME Shell now that Unity is being left to the cobwebs.

  • Canonical starts IPO path

    At OpenStack Summit, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth revealed in an interview that the recent changes in the Linux and cloud power were to ready Canonical for an IPO.

    In early April, Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu Linux was ending its " investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell." Ubuntu had long been a cloud power, and it's been building its Internet of Things (IoT) reputation. Soon thereafter, Canonical CEO Jane Silber announced she was stepping down and that Shuttleworth would return as CEO.

Node.js Foundation Interview and New Offer

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Development
Interviews

The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Doky

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Linux
Interviews

Open source continues to encourage and drive innovation globally, and Doky’s offerings are a perfect example of the positive loop created by open source projects leading to new products. Similar to how Linux forever changed the operating system landscape, Doky sees itself as a major catalyst for open source based software that users can access, use and collaborate with their favorite apps easily and in truly seamless and integrated way as never possible before.

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System76, GNOME, and Ubuntu

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Interviews
GNOME
Ubuntu
  • An interview with Ryan Sipes from System76 about Ubuntu and their future

    I did a little interview with Ryan Sipes from System76 about the future of Ubuntu and what they plan to do now Ubuntu is dropping the Unity desktop environment.

    This interview references this blog post by Mark Shuttleworth about Ubuntu moving back to GNOME Shell. I throw in some other questions for good measure.

  • 3.24 Release Party – Back in time

    So, this Saturday 15th, we got together in São Paulo, Brazil, to celebrate another GNOME release. And what a fun time!

    We went to a very nice place called “Taverna Medieval” (Medieval Tavern), an almost-real tavern with nice drinks, huge burgers (including the vegan one called “Elven of the Woods”! what a nice burger) and of course a super awsome tavern keeper.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus released

FOSS: Mastodon Social, Richard Stallman Interview, ODF Toolkit and More

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GNU
Interviews
OSS
  • What is GNU social and is Mastodon Social a “Twitter Clone”?

    Mastodon Social is the name of an instance on GNU social which uses the OStatus protocol to connect to a vast variety of servers in what’s known as a federation. Mastodon is also the name of the software being used on that server, which was developed by Eugen “Gargron” Rochko. It was built with Ruby on Rails, Redux, and React.js. I learned the latter from the Wikipedia page, which is about the extent of research given by any of the other articles published this week.

  • "Richard Stallman" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 14, 2017

    In today's episode of the Lunduke Hour, I get the chance to sit down and chat with the one and only Richard Stallman. Founder of the Free Software Foundation. We talk about everything from the W3C's stance on DRM to opinions on the movie "Galaxy Quest".

  • New version of ODF Toolkit released
  • Indian Engineer wins UN Challenge to create open-source tool providing greater visibility into Member State voting patterns

    Unite Ideas is a big data crowd-sourcing platform developed by the Office of Information and Communications Technology, which seeks to provide a platform for collaboration between academia, civil society, and the United Nations.The vast amount of information generated by the UN in at least 6 official languages, and formats e.g. documents, datasets, and multimedia is increasingly being made available to the public as “open data”. At Unite Ideas, the public can access not just these these datasets, but also the source code of the solutions to previously completed challenges and build on them. Solutions and expertise developed can be re-used by governments and civil society to support international peace and security, sustainable development, human rights, international law, and humanitarian aid.

  • Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news
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More in Tux Machines

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.