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Interviews

Linux was not meant to be open source

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The Linux community has a lot to shout about. In addition to a seemingly endless choice of distros to suit every taste and need, there's also the highly-prized security. This is helped to a large extent by the open source nature of Linux, but Linus Torvalds has revealed that being open source was not part of the original plan.

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Neville Cross: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Neville Cross is a Nicaraguan hotel manager who has a passion for technology. He has an Amateur Radio license, and was doing stuff with packet radio (ax.25 protocol) in 2008. That made him look for help in the local Linux community. As he used Red Hat Linux for a while in 2000, it was natural for him to take a look at Fedora. Instead of getting help, he got involved in the local FOSS community, especially in the Fedora local group. At that moment, others Linux distributions had strong support from the international community, but Fedora did not. So he took on the challenge to close the gap. That is how Cross originally showed up in Fedora landscape many years ago.

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A man with his Fingers in many millions of pies

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Linux
Interviews

At the time of writing, over five million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching legacy, helping the next generation of games designers and computer scientists find their feet.

Countless numbers of people have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software. We met Eben shortly before the launch of the model 2. He told us about the effort they’ve put into making the Pi better and how a chance conversation with the boss of Google shaped the Pi’s future.

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Solus Operating System interview

Filed under
OS
Interviews

This is where it starts to get a bit complicated… So to start from the end, EvolveOS and SolusOS are the same thing – we had to rebrand. I was living in the UK myself until last year, when I came back home [to Ireland]. So the problem I had is that I wanted to, ironically, protect the project from patent trolls, and in the process I had to apply for a trademark to protect the project. On April Fool’s day last year, of all days, I had a letter come through saying that I was going to be threatened with legal action, and I thought it might be about the name Evolve. It actually wasn’t – it was about the use of OS! Apparently the Ordnance Survey took a dislike to my using of it, as I was informed that the trademark was held by the Secretary of State – so I wasn’t allowed to use my name because of a map maker! When I was trying to explain it to people they were like, ‘Well what about Chrome OS? What about iOS?’ When I was in the UK at the time, Google was heavily invested with a lot of start-up companies and giving out Chromebooks and that, and that was through a partnership deal with the government. Apple had just furnished the House of Lords and the House of Commons with iPads. I imagine that the Secretary of State was quite happy to ignore the fact that they were using OS in their names… But the small fry like me? So I said, ‘Okay, we’ll change it.’ We went through a week trying to come up with a name, but in the end I decided to go back to the old name, which is where SolusOS comes in.

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KDE Interview Questions - Riccardo Iaconelli

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KDE
Interviews

Currently, I am the maintainer of WikiToLearn, working on all the parts of the project where is needed, but mostly on the promotion/networking side. I deliver talks and presentations, and I am in charge of getting in touch with excellent academic institutions that could partner with us.
In the past... well, I have been doing thousands of things! Smile I have been a core developer of Plasma, writing the first plasmoids, a core developer and a designer of Oxygen (working on the theme, window decoration, cursor theme, icons, wallpapers...) and many more things (from kdelibs to games to PIM). Probably the major work (outside these big projects) I am most proud of the complete UI redesign (and implementation) of Amarok in QML. It was sexy, but unfortunately it was never released, due to a decision of the maintainers.

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Luca Toma KDE Interview

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KDE
Interviews

Google Code In is our annual project to give tasks to school pupils to contribute to KDE projects. One task this year is to write a Dot article and top Code In student Stanford L has interviewed WikiToLearn contributor and Sysadmin Luca Toma.

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Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Francisco Tsao

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

n 1998, I got bored by the MS-DOS/Windows world. I was studying Civil Engineering, but in the neighborhood of my school was the Faculty of Computer Science, and I had some friends there. I began hearing about GNU/Linux from them. I bought a new computer and spent a weekend installing Debian 2.0 and, after a week, I had a graphical interface running on the box. The same year, I joined GPUL the Coruña Linux Users Group, where I learned a lot about tech and Free Software philosophy. Richard Stallman’s "The Right To Read" changed my life definitely. I'm very proud of my LUG (one that is still very much alive). In fact, this year we hosted the Akademy!

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The state of container security

Filed under
Server
Interviews
Security

This is a gross over-simplification, but multiple containers on a host is just the next logical step from multiple virtual machines on a host. Because those containers are tightly controlled by the kernel namespaced, Security Enhanced Linux, Linux kernel capabilities, and the like, you can be assured that the risk is minimal.

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How Kubernetes is helping Docker blossom

Filed under
Server
Interviews
OSS

Kubernetes and Docker are the latest buzz words in the IT sector. Businesses and IT enthusiasts alike are clamoring to learn more about containerization.

I managed to grab Red Hat software analyst Jason Brooks, who will be speaking at SCaLE 14x about Kubernetes, to ask him a few questions about the software and container movement.

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Young maker talks software defined radio, open source, and mentors

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Interviews
OSS

Schuyler St. Leger is one of the superheroes of the maker movement. He's a speaker, young maker, and was featured in Make magazine. His famous presentation, Why I love my 3-D Printer has received over 300,000 views on YouTube.

Schuyler is keynoting at SCaLE 14x, where he'll talk about open source radio and how it's impacting the world around us. We're surrounded by radios in smartphones, tablets, laptops, and Wi-Fi access points, yet we often fail to realize their ubiquitous presence. The airwaves are a fantastic space for exploration, but where do we begin? Open source radio combined with open hardware is a rich space for exploration and experimentation.

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Linux Foundation: Open Source Programming and DevOps Jobs Plentiful

Open source can help you make money, especially if you have skills in programming or DevOps, which is emerging as one of the hottest areas of interest for hiring managers seeking open source admins and developers. That's according to the latest Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation, which is out this week. Read more Also: The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report: Companies Hungry for Professional Open Source Talent

Basho Open Sources Some Bits

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • The Simply Ubuntu Desktop
    Over on Flickr, fosco_ submitted this simple Ubuntu desktop, with just a few things tweaked for a cleaner experience. Like we’ve said, sometimes less is more, and this desktop makes good use of a few widgets to make a great UI even better.
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.5 Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Debian 8.4
    The team of developers behind the HPLIP (short for HP Linux Imaging and Printing) project, announced a few moments ago the availability of the fifth maintenance build in the 3.16 stable series of the software. For those of you who are not in the loop, HP Linux Imaging and Printing is an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP (Hewlett-Packard) printer drivers to GNU/Linux operating systems. The software has a pretty active development team working behind it, releasing maintenance builds at least once a month.
  • Convergence delayed: Unity 8 won’t be the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10
    Canonical’s vision of convergence—a single, highly adaptive environment that spans mobile and desktop uses—has been delayed yet again. The Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server, which are key to that vision, won’t be used by default in Ubuntu 16.10, according to discussion in the Ubuntu Online Summit.
  • Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet
    After Jack Wallen's recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.

Bufferbloat Is Still Being Fought In Linux Kernel, Another Big Improvement Queued

Bufferbloat is the excess buffering of packets resulting in high latency, jitter, and lower network throughput. There's been efforts to battle bufferbloat within the Linux kernel going back a long time while this week another new patch has surfaced. A Phoronix reader pointed out to us a patch that's now been queued up in net-next for Linux 4.7 and could end up being back-ported to Linux stable releases. Read more Also: Watch why Linus Torvalds says Linux is the best option for career building