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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, SMLR, Linux Action News and GNU World Order

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Interviews

Shows: EndeavourOS, Destination Linux, and User Error

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Test and Code (Python), BSD Now, Ubuntu Podcast

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Interviews
  • Test and Code: 80: From Python script to Maintainable Package

    This episode is a story about packaging, and flit, tox, pytest, and coverage.
    And an alternate solution to "using the src".

    Python makes it easy to build simple tools for all kinds of tasks.
    And it's great to be able to share small projects with others on your team, in your company, or with the world.

    When you want to take a script from "just a script" to maintainable package, there are a few steps, but none of it's hard.

    Also, the structure of the code layout changes to help with the growth and support.

  • Changing face of Unix | BSD Now 305

    Website protection with OPNsense, FreeBSD Support Pull Request for ZFS-on-Linux, How much has Unix changed, Porting Wine to amd64 on NetBSD, FreeBSD Enterprise 1 PB Storage, the death watch for X11 has started, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E13 – Prince of Persia

    This week we’ve been giving talks and spending 8 and a half years becoming a Doctor of Philosophy. We discuss 32-bit Intel packages in Ubuntu, the Eoan Ermine wallpaper competition, Mir still not being dead, the new Snap Store, some jobs you might want to apply for, UbuCon Europe, Oggcamp, the new Raspberry Pi 4 and round up some headlines from the tech world.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, Full Circle Weekly and Linux Journal

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, This Week in Linux, Cinnamon Videos

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Interviews
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 152 - Tavis breaks the world ... again

    Josh and Kurt talk about the disclosure of security vulnerabilities. It's still not a settled topic, we frame the conversation around a recent disclosure from Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero.

  • Linux Action News 112

    We've got the new Raspberry Pi 4 and share our thoughts, why Microsoft applied to join the linux-distros mailing list, and Ubuntu's 32-bit future is clarified.

    Plus Mozilla's big plans Firefox on Android, and the future of Steam on Linux.

  • Episode 72 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have a massive show for you with a ton of great news! The Raspberry Pi 4 has arrived! Ubuntu Reverts their decision on 32-bit Packages, Valve. issues an Official Statement About their plans for Future Linux Support to reiterate their commitment. Valve also launched the highly anticipated and wallet frightening Steam Summer Sale. Mozilla announced a big update for their Android browser offerings with the new Firefox Preview. Mozilla also announced a new way to combat advertising trackers called, “track THIS”! Just in time for the Raspberry Pi 4, Kodi “Leia” 18.3 was Released this week. I recently was acquainted with some really cool projects called Drawpile for online collaborative drawing and RPCS3, a Linux emulator for the PlayStation 3. There’s also some potentially weird stuff that Microsoft is doing but let’s focus on the positive with a new central location for blogs from Linux Kernel Developers and a new Humble Bundle. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How to install Cinnamon 4.2 on Ubuntu 18.04
  • Cinnamon 4.2 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Cinnamon 4.2 which will be in Linux Mint 19.2. Enjoy!

Audiocasts/Shows: PCLinuxOS 2019.06 and GNU/Linux Miscellany

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PCLOS
Interviews

Audio and Video: TLLTS, FLOSS Weekly, ArchBang, Ubuntu and Dirk Hohndel

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Interviews

How a trip to China inspired Endless OS and teaching kids to hack

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OS
Interviews

Last year, I decided to try out Endless OS, a lightweight, Linux-based operating system developed to power inexpensive computers for developing markets. I wrote about installing and setting it up. Endless OS is unique because it uses a read-only root file system managed by OSTree and Flatpak, but the Endless company is unique for its approach to education.

Late last year, Endless announced the Hack, a $299 laptop manufactured by Asus that encourages kids to code, and most recently the company revealed The Third Terminal, a group of video games designed to get kids coding while they're having fun. Since I'm so involved in teaching kids to code, I wanted to learn more about Endless Studios, the company behind Endless OS, The Third Terminal, The Endless Mission, a sandbox-style game created in partnership with E-Line Media, and other ventures targeted at expanding digital literacy and agency among children around the world.

I reached out to Matt Dalio, Endless' founder, CEO, and chief of product and founder of the China Care Foundation, to ask about Endless and his charitable work supporting orphaned children with special needs in China.

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Videos: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0, Enso OS 0.3.1, OpenShift and Upbound

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GNU
Linux
Interviews
  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 overview | The best! ...until OpenMandriva does better.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Enso OS 0.3.1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Enso OS 0.3.1. Enjoy!

  • Video from KubeCon 2019: Red Hat in Barcelona

    From May 21-25, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage rolled into KubeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, a rare chance to bring different parts of the Red Hat community together from across Europe and the U.S. While there, we took the opportunity to sit down with members of the teams that are shaping the next evolution of container native storage in Red Hat OpenShift and throughout the Kubernetes ecosystem.

    We’ve put together highlights from Barcelona, where you’ll see what happens when you gather 7,700 people from the Kubernetes ecosystem in one place. You’ll also hear from members of Red Hat’s team in Barcelona—Distinguished Engineer Ju Lim, Senior Architect Annette Clewett, Rook Senior Maintainer Travis Nielsen and others—about what’s exciting them now, and what’s ahead.

  • Bassam Tabbara: Next 10 Years Should Be About Open Cloud

    During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Barcelona, we sat down with Bassam Tabbara – CEO and founder of Upbound to talk about the company he is building to make the next decade about Open / Open Source Cloud, breaking away from the proprietary cloud. Tabbara shared his insights into how AWS, Azure and the rest leverage open source technologies to create the proprietary clouds. He wants to change that.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Magazine, This Week in Linux, Open Source Security Podcast and Linux Gaming News Punch

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers. Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks. Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration. Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices. Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

Releasing Slax 9.11.0

New school year has started again and next version of Slax is here too :) this time it is 9.11.0. This release includes all bug fixes and security updates from Debian 9.11 (code name Jessie), and adds a boot parameter to disable console blanking (console blanking is disabled by default). You can get the newest version at the project's home page, there are options to purchase Slax on DVD or USB device, as well as links for free download. Surprisingly for me we skipped 9.10, I am not sure why :) I also experimented with the newly released series of Debian 10 (code name Buster) and noticed several differences which need addressing, so Slax based on Debian 10 is in progress, but not ready yet. Considering my current workload and other circumstances, it will take some more time to get it ready, few weeks at least. Read more Also: Slax 9.11 Released While Re-Base To Debian 10 Is In Development

today's howtos

KDE Frameworks 5.62.0 and Reports From Akademy 2019 in Milan

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62.0

    KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62 Released With KWayland Additions & Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.62 is out today as the latest monthly update to this collection of KDE libraries complementing the Qt5 tool-kit offerings.

  • Back from Akademy 2019 in Milan

    The last week I was in Milan with my wife Aiswarya to attend Akademy 2019, the yearly event of the KDE community. Once again it was a great experience, with lots of interesting conferences and productive BoF sessions (“Birds of a Feather”, a common name for a project meeting during a conference). On Sunday, we presented our talk “GCompris in Kerala, part 2”. First, Aiswarya told some bits of Free-Software history in Kerala, gave examples of how GCompris is used there, and explained her work to localize the new version of GCompris in Malayalam (the language of this Indian state). Then I made a quick report of what happened in GCompris the last 2 years, and talked about the things to come for our next release.

  • Akademy was a blast!

    I attended my first ever Akademy! The event was held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy this year. And the experience was splendid. During the 2 day conference, I had the opportunity to talk at the Student Showcase, where all of the SoC students presented their work to the community. There were about 8 students, and everyone gave a good briefing on their project. My project this summer was with Kdenlive, the open source non linear professional video editor. I proposed to revamp one of the frequently used tools in the editor, called the Titler tool, which is used to create title clips. Title clips are video clips that contain text and/or images that are composited or appended to your video (eg: subtitles). The problem with the titler tool as it is, is that it uses QGraphicsView to describe a title clip and QGraphicsView was deprecated since the release of Qt5. This obviously leads to problems - upstream bugs crawling affecting the functionality of the tool and an overall degradation in the ease of maintenance of the codebase. Moreover, adding new features to the existing code base was no easy task and therefore, a complete revamp was something in sights of the developer community in Kdenlive for a long time now. I proposed to rework on the backend for the period of GSoC replacing the use of XML with QML and use a new rendering backend with QQuickRenderControl, along with a new MLT module to handle the QML frames. I was able to cover most of the proposed work, I seek to continue working on it and finish evolving the titler tool.