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Interviews

Shows and Events: OpenShift Commons Briefing, Linux Gaming News Punch, SUSE, Libre Graphics Meeting 2019 and More

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  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift on IBM Power with Manoj Kumar (IBM)
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Deploy Applications Faster on OpenShift via Spinnaker CD with Gopinath Rebala (Opsmx)
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 15, another weekly round-up

    For the fifteenth week running, here's your bite-sized round-up of a few interesting bits of Linux gaming news from the past week.

  • An interview with Thomas Di Giacomo about the state of Kubernetes

    I recently attended KubeCon EU 2019 in Barcelona. While there, I got the chance to chat with our CTO, Thomas Di Giacomo, about the state of Kubernetes and its marketplace. We also talked about the community centered culture of Kubernetes as well as some his dreams for the tech world. It was a great conversation and I believe it highlights just why there is this incredible amount of hype surrounding Kubernetes:

  • Geekos, Containers, and Clouds… Oh my! (Case Study of SUSE’s Integrated Stack)

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Rick Ashford and Nathan Nelson from SUSE demonstrated how the Global Sales Engineering team uses its geeko.land cloud to demonstrate the full stack solution of SUSE OpenStack Cloud, SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE CaaS Platform, and SUSE Cloud Application Platform, all fully integrated and working together. They provide an overview of the Sales Engineering lab infrastructure and lessons learned during deployment and integration of our private cloud deployment.

  • I was at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2019

    I had a nice surprise last Monday, I learned that the city where I live Saarbrücken (Germany) is hosting the 2019 edition of the nice Libre Graphics Meeting (lgm). So I took the opportunity to attend my first FOSS event. The event took place at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Saar from the Wed 29.05 to Sunday 02.06.

    I really enjoyed, I meet a lot of other Free Software contributors (not only devs), and discovered some nice programming and artistic projects.

    There were some really impressive presentations and workshops.

  • Recommended Open Source Compliance Practices for the Enterprise

    Recommended Open Source Compliance Practices for the Enterprise
    Open source software provides significant economies to be gained through shared and transparent development, which offers access to source code, the ability to customize the source code based on specific needs, results in faster time-to-market for products and services, and provides access to a large pool of innovators. As such, open source software provides major competitive advantages when used appropriately, and when users comply with its licensing terms.

    With an incredibly high adoption rate and the increasing rapid adaptation of source code, enterprises are often on the lookout for better ways to maintain proper license compliance for the hundreds and thousands of open source components included in their products and services. This paper offers practical recommendations to help them improve their open source compliance practices.

  • The Open Infrastructure Summit comes to Shanghai

    The Call for Presentations for the Open Infrastructure Summit in Shanghai is now open, closing on July 2nd. This is the first time that the Open Infrastructure community has descended en masse upon mainland China, so this is an exciting milestone for Open Infrastructure.

    At the recent Summit in Denver, we saw presentations given by community members from around the globe – sharing their stories, presenting alongside others working for competing organisations to share knowledge and find solutions to problems. As Jonathan Bryce’s keynote put it – collaborating without borders.

Shows: Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

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  • Linux Action News 108

    Frankenstein Linux malware and a Docker bug that’s blown out of proportion get our attention this week.

    As well as the new GParted release, the Unity Editor for Linux and the Browser vendors struggle with the W3C’s latest twist.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 148 - You just got pwnt, what now?

    Josh and Kurt talk about public disclosure of a security incident. We start out with a story about Canva, then discuss what do you do if you have a security incident? Who do you tell, what do you tell them. How do you tell your story? It's a really hard problem even if it's something you've done many times in the past.

  • GNU World Order 13x23

Shows: BSD Now, Python Bytes, TFiR, Choose Linux

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Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, TFIR and The Linux Link Tech Show

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Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu's rise - and taking Canonical Public

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Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth, the CEO of Canonical (the business behind the open source Ubuntu operating system), has bootstrapped his company for 15 years, remaining doggedly committed to making the Linux-based OS a commercial success and eschewing the unicorn status-chasing of your typical VC-backed contemporary tech startup.

Having sold his first business after just four years for $575 million – at the age of 26 –and with Canonical, he admits, still not quite profitable a decade and a half in, the commitment is obvious. The strategic focus has not always been quite as clear.

Two years after a shakeup that saw his company pivot firmly away from desktop and mobile to servers/infrastructure, it has become more so. So, how is the company doing, is it profitable yet – and what of that elusive and much-promised IPO?

Mark Shuttleworth joined Computer Business Review for a chat from his Isle of Man home, to talk company strategy, the future of open source, Red Hat’s “legacy, shrink-wrapped Solaris equivalent”, why he’s been spending quality time in his garden, and more.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 580

Audio/Video: TLLTS, BSD Now, FLOSS Weekly and Peppermint OS 10 Overview

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Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, SMLR and This Week in Linux

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  • Batteries are Leaking | Coder Radio 358

    A strong argument against Python’s batteries included model exposes some bigger problems the community is struggling with. We chat about all of it.

    Plus lessons learned six years after a project, a new tool, and some feedback.

  • SMLR 307 Night of The Living Daemon
  • This Week in Linux 67 | Zombieload, Nextcloud, Peppermint 10, KDE Plasma, IPFire, ArcoLinux, LuneOS

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ll check out some Distro News from Peppermint OS, ArcoLinux, LuneOS & IPFire. We got a couple apps to talking about like Nextclou0…d and a new Wallpaper tool that has quite a bit of potential. We’ll take a look at what is to come with the next version of KDE Plasma. Intel users have gotten some more bad news regarding a new security vulnerability. Later in the show, we’ll cover some interesting information regarding a couple governments saving money by switching to Linux. Then finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming News. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Audiocasts/Shows: Python Podcast, Linux Gaming News Punch, GNU World Order, Open Source Security and Linux Action News

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  • Podcast.__init__: Hardware Hacking Made Easy With CircuitPython

    Learning to program can be a frustrating process, because even the simplest code relies on a complex stack of other moving pieces to function. When working with a microcontroller you are in full control of everything so there are fewer concepts that need to be understood in order to build a functioning project. CircuitPython is a platform for beginner developers that provides easy to use abstractions for working with hardware devices. In this episode Scott Shawcroft explains how the project got started, how it relates to MicroPython, some of the cool ways that it is being used, and how you can get started with it today. If you are interested in playing with low cost devices without having to learn and use C then give this a listen and start tinkering!

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 13, your weekly round-up podcast is here

    Grab a cup of coffee and come listen to some news you may have missed over the last week or so, as the Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 13 has arrived.

    As always, if you read GamingOnLinux every day this will all seem rather familiar. This bite-sized podcast is aimed at everyone who doesn't have the time for that.

  • GNU World Order_13x21
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 146 - What the @#$% happened to Microsoft? [Ed: New PR strategy, same old EEE. Some people are easily fooled.]

    Josh and Kurt talk about Microsoft. They're probably not the bad guys anymore, which is pretty wild. They're adding a Linux kernel to Window. Can we declare open source the unquestionable winner now?

  • Linux Action News 106

    ZombieLoad's impact on Linux, AMP to start hiding Google from the URL, and the huge Linux switch underway.

    Plus the impact of Google suspending business with Huawei, the recent ChromeOS feature silently dropped, and more.

Media: KDE Plasma 5.16 Beta, Intel’s Clear Linux and Ubuntu Podcast

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Audio: Latest BSD Now, TLLTS and FLOSS Weekly

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  • BSD On The Road | BSD Now 298

    36 year old UFS bug fixed, a BSD for the road, automatic upgrades with OpenBSD, DTrace ext2fs support in FreeBSD, Dedicated SSH tunnel user, upgrading VMM VMs to OpenBSD 6.5, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 809
  • FLOSS Weekly 530: RavenDB

    RavenDB is a database that solves the biggest problems enterprises and small businesses encounter before they even encounter them. RavenDB allows you to set up and secure a distributed database cluster in minutes with a low overhead database that does the work for you.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Clear Linux Is Being Used Within Some Automobiles

    Intel's speedy Clear Linux distribution could be running under the hood of your car. While we're fascinated by the performance of Intel's open-source Clear Linux distribution that it offers meaningful performance advantages over other distributions while still focused on security and offering a diverse package set, we often see it asked... who uses Clear Linux? Some argue that Clear Linux is just a toy or technology demo, but it's actually more.

  • Radeon ROCm 2.7.2 Released

    Radeon ROCm 2.7.2 is now available as the newest update to AMD's open-source GPU compute stack for Linux systems. ROCm 2.7.2 is a small release that just fixes the upgrade path when moving from older ROCm releases, v2.7.2 should now be running correctly. This release comes after the recent ROCm 2.7.1 point release that had corrected some components from properly loading the ROC tracer library.

  • How To Install Webmin on Debian 10 Linux
  • GNOME Shell + Mutter Patches Pending For Wayland Fullscreen Compositing Bypass

    There's an exciting patch set to GNOME Shell and Mutter now pending for finally wiring up the full-screen unredirected display / full-screen bypass compositing for helping the performance of full-screen games in particular on Wayland. GNOME on X11 has long supported the full-screen compositing bypass so the window manager / compositor gets out of the way when running full-screen games/applications. That support under Wayland hasn't been in place and thus there is a performance hit for full-screen Wayland-native software. But now thanks to Red Hat's Jonas Ådahl, that infrastructure now appears to be ready.

  • Xabber Server v.0.9 alpha is released

    After almost three years of research, planning and development we're proud to present the first public version of Xabber Server. Server is licensed under GNU AGPL v3 license, source code is available on GitHub. It is a fork of superb open source source XMPP server ejabberd by ProcessOne, with many custom protocol improvements an an all-new management panel.

  • September Edition of Plasma5 for Slackware

    After a summer hiatus during which I only released new packages for KDE Frameworks because they addressed a serious security hole, I am now back in business and just released KDE-5_19.09 for Slackware-current. The packages for KDE-5_19.09 are available for download from my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2. On my laptop with slackware64-current, this new release of Plasma5 runs smooth.

  • Pen-testing duo cuffed for breaking into courthouse that hired them

    Later, the County official discovered that the two men were in fact, hired by the state court administration to try to "access" court records through "various means" to find out potential security vulnerabilities of the electronic court records.

    The state court administration acknowledged that the two men had been hired, but said they were not supposed to physically break into the courthouse.

  • Satellite, GNU Radio and SDR talks released

    Mark M5BOP reports the complete set of amateur radio technical talks from this year's Martlesham Microwave Round Table is now available to watch on YouTube Videos of these MMRT 2019 talks are available: • Practical GNUradio - Heather Lomond M0HMO

  • Destination Linux 138 - GNOME 3.34, Firefox 69, Librem 5, Chromebooks, Signal Messenger & more

    On DL 138 Gnome 3.34 Drops This Week, Super Grub2 Disk 2.04s1 Released, Firefox 69 Released, Purism Librem 5 Shipping, Chromebooks Targeting The Enterprise, Phantom 3D Coming To Linux

  • Agile project management: 10 reasons to use it

    On the road to change, you’ll encounter fear and loathing. People will undoubtedly cling to old ways of working. Successfully making it to the other side will require commitment, passionate change agents, and unwavering leadership. You might wonder – is it really worth it? Leaders who have made the switch to agile project management say that it has delivered benefits both large and small to their organizations, from the rituals that bring their team together – like daily stand-ups – to the results that make their business stronger – like better end products and happier customers.

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers. Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks. Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration. Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices. Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

Releasing Slax 9.11.0

New school year has started again and next version of Slax is here too :) this time it is 9.11.0. This release includes all bug fixes and security updates from Debian 9.11 (code name Jessie), and adds a boot parameter to disable console blanking (console blanking is disabled by default). You can get the newest version at the project's home page, there are options to purchase Slax on DVD or USB device, as well as links for free download. Surprisingly for me we skipped 9.10, I am not sure why :) I also experimented with the newly released series of Debian 10 (code name Buster) and noticed several differences which need addressing, so Slax based on Debian 10 is in progress, but not ready yet. Considering my current workload and other circumstances, it will take some more time to get it ready, few weeks at least. Read more Also: Slax 9.11 Released While Re-Base To Debian 10 Is In Development

today's howtos