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Interviews

OSU Open Source Lab leader looks to further FOSS community outreach

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Interviews
OSS

I had a wonderful run at Google -- more than six years -- and decided it was time for a change of scene, both career-wise and geographically. I had worked extensively with the team at OSU's Open Source Lab during my time at Google and had consistently been impressed with their support of the open source community and their leadership in bringing open source into computer science education. My new role allows me to support both aspects of their mission, and I am very excited to join them.

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Tips on Scaling Open Source in the Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

I can summarize that in three points for application developers: a shorter learning curve, better security with less hassle, and more resources with increased agility.

First is the shortened learning curve. Developers just want to develop applications when they use open source. They want to focus on their particular application logic and they want to decide what features to develop. They do not want to spend time and effort on managing the physical infrastructure, an aggravation cloud computing eliminates.

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Young programmer turns love of gaming into a Google Summer of Code project

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Google
Interviews
Gaming

Recently I installed the GCompris educational software suite on a friend's Linux laptop. While researching information about the application, I found out about Rudra Nil Basu, a young programmer from India, who has blogged about his contributions to GCompris. Based on his work, he was selected to be a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) participant and will receive a stipend to continue working to improve GCompris.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Rudra some questions about how he's translating his passion for game development into making learning fun for young children and supporting open source software and source code sharing. Some questions and answers have been lightly edited for clarity.

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Riley Brandt: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Brandt was initially worried that he would have a more difficult time getting help when he was making the transition from Ubuntu to Fedora. “I was worried that since Fedora has a smaller user base than Ubuntu, I would have trouble getting support. But that wasn’t the case at all. Fedora users were quick to respond to my questions and full of useful info.”

His experience with the Fedora community helped him realize it should not just be the desktop environment or package manager that influences the decision on what distro to use. “Not enough people think about the community. Fedora’s community might be its biggest selling point.”

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Red Hat Interviews

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Red Hat
Interviews
  • Red Hat exec talks up new London 'innovation lab'
  • Red Hat exec talks open source strategies, innovation and VMware [iophk: "Free Software?"]

    So, even as things turn into 'products by vendors' or services through cloud, they're generally started with some sort of open source community. The only place where I think there's innovation going on [outside open source] would be some more niche areas, vertical applications where it just doesn't lend itself to broad open source contribution in communities. But I'd say most of the broad-based innovation taking place today starts with open source.

Mark Shuttleworth Reaffirms Commitment to Desktop, Canonical IPO Talk

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GNU
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Ubuntu on the Desktop Will Remain Important to Canonical

    The OpenStack Summit 2017 event kicked off today in Boston, MA, and Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth was there to discuss the upcoming plans for Ubuntu on the desktop, cloud computing, and IoT (Internet of Things).

    The Canonical and Ubuntu founder was interviewed there by theCUBE, who were very curious to know what is the state of Ubuntu Linux these days, now that Mark Shuttleworth shocked the Open Source community when he announced last month that development of the Unity interface is shut down, along with the convergence vision.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Says Ubuntu Desktop “Remains Really Important”

    Mark Shuttleworth has reiterated that the Ubuntu desktop “remains really important” to Canonical.

    He made the comments in an interview with The Cube at the OpenStack Summit 2017 taking place in the USA this week.

    Asked to describe the current state of Ubuntu following last month’s announcement that Canonical is to end investment in Ubuntu Phone, Unity 8, convergence, the Ubuntu founder admitted that Ubuntu ‘failed’ to take Ubuntu mainstream in personal computing.

  • My Current Ubuntu Desktop (And How You Can Recreate It)

    As you may have heard me mention in the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, I’ve been ankle deep in GNOME extensions these past few weeks. Why? Well, like many of you I have made a preëmptive switch to GNOME Shell now that Unity is being left to the cobwebs.

  • Canonical starts IPO path

    At OpenStack Summit, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth revealed in an interview that the recent changes in the Linux and cloud power were to ready Canonical for an IPO.

    In early April, Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu Linux was ending its " investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell." Ubuntu had long been a cloud power, and it's been building its Internet of Things (IoT) reputation. Soon thereafter, Canonical CEO Jane Silber announced she was stepping down and that Shuttleworth would return as CEO.

Node.js Foundation Interview and New Offer

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Development
Interviews

The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Doky

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Linux
Interviews

Open source continues to encourage and drive innovation globally, and Doky’s offerings are a perfect example of the positive loop created by open source projects leading to new products. Similar to how Linux forever changed the operating system landscape, Doky sees itself as a major catalyst for open source based software that users can access, use and collaborate with their favorite apps easily and in truly seamless and integrated way as never possible before.

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System76, GNOME, and Ubuntu

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Interviews
GNOME
Ubuntu
  • An interview with Ryan Sipes from System76 about Ubuntu and their future

    I did a little interview with Ryan Sipes from System76 about the future of Ubuntu and what they plan to do now Ubuntu is dropping the Unity desktop environment.

    This interview references this blog post by Mark Shuttleworth about Ubuntu moving back to GNOME Shell. I throw in some other questions for good measure.

  • 3.24 Release Party – Back in time

    So, this Saturday 15th, we got together in São Paulo, Brazil, to celebrate another GNOME release. And what a fun time!

    We went to a very nice place called “Taverna Medieval” (Medieval Tavern), an almost-real tavern with nice drinks, huge burgers (including the vegan one called “Elven of the Woods”! what a nice burger) and of course a super awsome tavern keeper.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus released

FOSS: Mastodon Social, Richard Stallman Interview, ODF Toolkit and More

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GNU
Interviews
OSS
  • What is GNU social and is Mastodon Social a “Twitter Clone”?

    Mastodon Social is the name of an instance on GNU social which uses the OStatus protocol to connect to a vast variety of servers in what’s known as a federation. Mastodon is also the name of the software being used on that server, which was developed by Eugen “Gargron” Rochko. It was built with Ruby on Rails, Redux, and React.js. I learned the latter from the Wikipedia page, which is about the extent of research given by any of the other articles published this week.

  • "Richard Stallman" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 14, 2017

    In today's episode of the Lunduke Hour, I get the chance to sit down and chat with the one and only Richard Stallman. Founder of the Free Software Foundation. We talk about everything from the W3C's stance on DRM to opinions on the movie "Galaxy Quest".

  • New version of ODF Toolkit released
  • Indian Engineer wins UN Challenge to create open-source tool providing greater visibility into Member State voting patterns

    Unite Ideas is a big data crowd-sourcing platform developed by the Office of Information and Communications Technology, which seeks to provide a platform for collaboration between academia, civil society, and the United Nations.The vast amount of information generated by the UN in at least 6 official languages, and formats e.g. documents, datasets, and multimedia is increasingly being made available to the public as “open data”. At Unite Ideas, the public can access not just these these datasets, but also the source code of the solutions to previously completed challenges and build on them. Solutions and expertise developed can be re-used by governments and civil society to support international peace and security, sustainable development, human rights, international law, and humanitarian aid.

  • Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news
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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Security: SSL, Microsoft Windows TCO, Security Breach Detection and SIM Hijackers

  • Why Does Google Chrome Say Websites Are “Not Secure”?
    Starting with Chrome 68, Google Chrome labels all non-HTTPS websites as “Not Secure.” Nothing else has changed—HTTP websites are just as secure as they’ve always been—but Google is giving the entire web a shove towards secure, encrypted connections.
  • Biggest Voting Machine Maker Admits -- Ooops -- That It Installed Remote Access Software After First Denying It [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]
    We've been covering the mess that is electronic voting machines for nearly two decades on Techdirt, and the one thing that still flummoxes me is how are they so bad at this after all these years? And I don't mean "bad at security" -- though, that's part of it -- but I really mean "bad at understanding how insecure their machines really are." For a while everyone focused on Diebold, but Election Systems and Software (ES&S) has long been a bigger player in the space, and had just as many issues. It just got less attention. There was even a brief period of time where ES&S bought what remained of Diebold's flailing e-voting business before having to sell off the assets to deal with an antitrust lawsuit by the DOJ. What's incredible, though, is that every credible computer security person has said that it is literally impossible to build a secure fully electronic voting system -- and if you must have one at all, it must have a printed paper audit trail and not be accessible from the internet. Now, as Kim Zetter at Motherboard has reported, ES&S -- under questioning from Senator Ron Wyden -- has now admitted that it installed remote access software on its voting machines, something the company had vehemently denied to the same reporter just a few months ago.
  • Bringing cybersecurity to the DNC [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO. Microsoft Exchange was used.]
    When Raffi Krikorian joined the Democratic National Committee (DNC) as chief technology officer, the party was still reeling from its devastating loss in 2016 — and the stunning cyberattacks that resulted in high-level officials’ emails being embarrassingly leaked online.
  • Getting Started with Successful Security Breach Detection
    Organizations historically believed that security software and tools were effective at protecting them from hackers. Today, this is no longer the case, as modern businesses are now connected in a digital global supply ecosystem with a web of connections to customers and suppliers. Often, organizations are attacked as part of a larger attack on one of their customers or suppliers. They represent low hanging fruit for hackers, as many organizations have not invested in operationalizing security breach detection. As this new reality takes hold in the marketplace, many will be tempted to invest in new technology tools to plug the perceived security hole and move on with their current activities. However, this approach is doomed to fail. Security is not a "set it and forget it" type of thing. Defending an organization from a breach requires a careful balance of tools and operational practices -- operational practices being the more important element.
  • The SIM Hijackers

    By hijacking Rachel’s phone number, the hackers were able to seize not only Rachel’s Instagram, but her Amazon, Ebay, Paypal, Netflix, and Hulu accounts too. None of the security measures Rachel took to secure some of those accounts, including two-factor authentication, mattered once the hackers took control of her phone number.

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Windows Spying

  • Changes [Pop!_OS]

    For the last 12 years, my main development machine has been a Mac. As of last week, it’s a Dell XPS 13 running Pop!_OS 18.04.

    [...]

    Take note: this is the first operating system I’ve used that is simpler, more elegant, and does certain things better than macOS.

  • System76 Opens Manufacturing Facility to Build Linux Laptops
    As it turns out, System76 is making the transition from a Linux-based computer seller, into a complete Linux-based computer manufacturer. The Twitter photos are from their new manufacturing facility. This means that System76 will no longer be slapping their logo on other company’s laptops and shipping them out, but making their own in-house laptops for consumers.
  • Extension adding Windows Timeline support to third-party browsers should have raised more privacy questions
    Windows Timeline is a unified activity history explorer that received a prominent placement next to the Start menu button in Windows 10 earlier this year. You can see all your activities including your web browser history and app activity across all your Windows devices in one place; and pickup and resume activities you were doing on other devices. This is a useful and cool feature, but it’s also a privacy nightmare. You may have read about a cool new browser extension that adds your web browsing history from third-party web browsers — including Firefox, Google Chrome, Vivaldi, and others — to Windows Timeline. The extension attracted some media attention from outlets like MSPoweruser, Neowin, The Verge, and Windows Central.

Public money, public code? FSFE spearheads open-source initiative

Last September, the non-profit Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) launched a new campaign that calls for EU-wide legislation that requires publicly financed software developed for the public sector to be made publicly available under a free and open-source software license. According to the ‘Public Money, Public Code’ open letter, free and open-source software in the public sector would enable anyone to “use, study, share, and improve applications used on a daily basis”. The initiative, says the non-profit, would provide safeguards against public sector organizations being locked into services from specific companies that use “restrictive licenses” to hinder competition. The FSFE also says the open-source model would help improve security in the public sector, as it would allow backdoors and other vulnerabilities to fixed quickly, without depending on one single service provider. Since its launch, the Public Money, Public Code initiative has gained the support of 150 organizations, including WordPress Foundation, Wikimedia Foundation, and Tor, along with nearly 18,000 individuals. With the initiative now approaching its first anniversary, The Daily Swig caught up with FSFE spokesperson Paul Brown, who discussed the campaign’s progress. Read more