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Interviews

New Debian leader says decision-making an area that could be improved

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Interviews
Debian

The new leader of the Debian GNU/Linux project says one thing that is holding back the project is the length of time it takes to take decisions, with developers often getting frustrated with the tools and processes that are used.
"Debian is great for experimenting with lots of ways of doing things. We aren't always great at consolidating on the solution that ended up working best when we're done with those experiments," Sam Hartman, who was elected as leader for a one-year term on 20 April, told iTWire during an interview.

Hartman, who was born blind, has been with the project for nearly 20 years, and credits his wife with having given him the necessary motivation to run for the post of leader. "Her encouragement to go do what I believe in and run for DPL gave me the final confirmation that this investment in Debian was worth it for me," he said.

Read more

Also: Jonathan Dowland: mutt year zero

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly with Aquameta and TLLTS (Linux Link Tech Show)

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Interviews
  • FLOSS Weekly 527: Aquameta Revisited

    Aquameta is a web development environment where instead of storing code as flat files in the file system, everything is stored in PostgreSQL as relational data, including source code, HTML, CSS, Javascript, images and other resources, system configurations, database schema, permissions and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 806

Shows: mintCast 307 and LINUX Unplugged 298

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Interviews
  • mintCast 307 – Encryption Part 1

    This is Leo and with me I have Joe, Moss, and the return of Rob for this episode! We’re recording on Sunday April 21st 2019.

    First up, in our Wanderings, I talk Kernel 5.0 and transfer speed, Joe reformats and loses Windows but gains NVidia peace of mind, and finally Moss digests more distros and has some success with migrating Kodi

    Then, our news is filled with updates from top to bottom.

    In our Innards section, we dive into file and disk encryption.

  • Blame Joe | LINUX Unplugged 298

    This week we discover the good word of Xfce and admit Joe was right all along. And share our tips for making Xfce more modern.

    Plus a new Debian leader, the end of Scientific Linux, and behind the scenes of Librem 5 apps.

Video/Audio: Battlefield Bad Company 2, Friday Stream and Greybeard's Worst Nightmare

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Interviews
  • Battlefield Bad Company 2 | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Battlefield Bad Company 2 running through Steam play.

  • Ang Takes a Punch – The Friday Stream

    A bunch of the crew get together and share a few stories, recap the week, and play a little music.

    This is a beta test of a community live event we are doing on Fridays at 2pm Pacific: http://jblive.tv

  • Video: A Greybeard's Worst Nightmare (Updated)

    Trying to wrap one's head around the paradigm changes happening in the industry can be difficult. Everything is just moving way too fast. Daniel Riek has been giving a talk for a while now entitled, "A Greybeard's Worst Nightmare." Here is a fairly recent iteration of his talk where he does an excellent job of providing both a historical context and a bridge to understanding the revolution and evolution that is happening. Unfortunately a lot of the progress has been coming from black box services provided by proprietary companies who don't see lock-in as a problem. Daniel explains how the benefits that have been gained by adopting free and open source software don't have to be abandoned in an effort to keep up with industry methodology shifts providing the most innovation and value. We can and are keeping up... but there is a LOT to learn.

Audio/Video: FLOSS Weekly, TLLTS and Choose Linux

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Interviews
  • FLOSS Weekly 526: Ionic

    Ionic Framework is the free, open source mobile UI toolkit for developing high-quality cross-platform apps for native iOS, Android, and the web—all from a single codebase. Build with intuitive UI components that accelerate app development, and can be deployed virtually anywhere.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 805
  • The Xfce Surprise + Entroware Ares Review | Choose Linux 7

    Jason leaves the warm embrace of GNOME and finally tries Xfce for 24 hours. What happened took him by surprise!

    Then we dive into some hardware talk about the latest All-In-One Linux PC from Entroware, which packs in a lot of quality for the price. But are there any downsides?

Video/Audio: Ubuntu Budgie 19.04, LINUX Unplugged 297 and More

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Audio/Video: This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Python, Rust and GhostBSD

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  • Episode 63 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we take a look at some new app releases from Emacs, OBS Studio, Mark Text, Flatpak and more. We’ll also check out some distro releases from MX Linux, NixOS, Proxmox and more. In the Core News section of the show, we’ll discuss some updates to GRUB, Coreboot, and WINE. Later in the show, we’ll take a look at an update from the KDE Plasma Mobile team as well as a new Humble Bundle with educational games for kids. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 8

    Coming at you a little later than expected due to a real killer of a cold, the Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 8 is here.

    This is your once a week-ish quick look over some interesting bits of news for Linux gamers. Hopefully this helps some of you keep up to date, with so much news happening all the time. As always, it's available in both audio and video form.

  • Podcast.__init__: Exploring Python's Internals By Rewriting Them In Rust

    The CPython interpreter has been the primary implementation of the Python runtime for over 20 years. In that time other options have been made available for different use cases. The most recent entry to that list is RustPython, written in the memory safe language Rust. One of the added benefits is the option to compile to WebAssembly, offering a browser-native Python runtime. In this episode core maintainers Windel Bouwman and Adam Kelly explain how the project got started, their experience working on it, and the plans for the future. Definitely worth a listen if you are curious about the inner workings of Python and how you can get involved in a relatively new project that is contributing to new options for running your code.

  • GhostBSD 19.04 overview | A simple, elegant desktop BSD Operating System

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of GhostBSD 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Richard Stallman: Facebook is surveillance monster feeding on our personal data

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GNU
Interviews

Our world today may be a high-tech wonderland, but we, the users, own nothing in it, with our personal data being the new oil for Big Tech. How do we break its grip on our digital lives? We asked Richard Stallman, the founder and leader of the Free Software Movement.

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Audio/Video: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, GNU World Order, Going Linux on Kubuntu (and KDE Project Latte Dock Has Release)

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New Shows/Podcasts

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Interviews
  • LHS Episode #281: The Weekender XXVII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Everyday ZFS | TechSNAP 401

    Jim and Wes sit down to bust some ZFS myths and share their tips and tricks for getting the most out of the ultimate filesystem.

    Plus when not to use ZFS, the surprising way your disks are lying to you, and more!

  • Linux Without Borders | User Error 63

    Where bad feeling and rivalry in the FOSS world actually originates, what we should be teaching our kids, and the violence that underlies everything around us.

    Plus Joe is a lazy swine, and dodgy VPN providers.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers. Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks. Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration. Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices. Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

Releasing Slax 9.11.0

New school year has started again and next version of Slax is here too :) this time it is 9.11.0. This release includes all bug fixes and security updates from Debian 9.11 (code name Jessie), and adds a boot parameter to disable console blanking (console blanking is disabled by default). You can get the newest version at the project's home page, there are options to purchase Slax on DVD or USB device, as well as links for free download. Surprisingly for me we skipped 9.10, I am not sure why :) I also experimented with the newly released series of Debian 10 (code name Buster) and noticed several differences which need addressing, so Slax based on Debian 10 is in progress, but not ready yet. Considering my current workload and other circumstances, it will take some more time to get it ready, few weeks at least. Read more Also: Slax 9.11 Released While Re-Base To Debian 10 Is In Development

today's howtos

KDE Frameworks 5.62.0 and Reports From Akademy 2019 in Milan

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62.0

    KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62 Released With KWayland Additions & Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.62 is out today as the latest monthly update to this collection of KDE libraries complementing the Qt5 tool-kit offerings.

  • Back from Akademy 2019 in Milan

    The last week I was in Milan with my wife Aiswarya to attend Akademy 2019, the yearly event of the KDE community. Once again it was a great experience, with lots of interesting conferences and productive BoF sessions (“Birds of a Feather”, a common name for a project meeting during a conference). On Sunday, we presented our talk “GCompris in Kerala, part 2”. First, Aiswarya told some bits of Free-Software history in Kerala, gave examples of how GCompris is used there, and explained her work to localize the new version of GCompris in Malayalam (the language of this Indian state). Then I made a quick report of what happened in GCompris the last 2 years, and talked about the things to come for our next release.

  • Akademy was a blast!

    I attended my first ever Akademy! The event was held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy this year. And the experience was splendid. During the 2 day conference, I had the opportunity to talk at the Student Showcase, where all of the SoC students presented their work to the community. There were about 8 students, and everyone gave a good briefing on their project. My project this summer was with Kdenlive, the open source non linear professional video editor. I proposed to revamp one of the frequently used tools in the editor, called the Titler tool, which is used to create title clips. Title clips are video clips that contain text and/or images that are composited or appended to your video (eg: subtitles). The problem with the titler tool as it is, is that it uses QGraphicsView to describe a title clip and QGraphicsView was deprecated since the release of Qt5. This obviously leads to problems - upstream bugs crawling affecting the functionality of the tool and an overall degradation in the ease of maintenance of the codebase. Moreover, adding new features to the existing code base was no easy task and therefore, a complete revamp was something in sights of the developer community in Kdenlive for a long time now. I proposed to rework on the backend for the period of GSoC replacing the use of XML with QML and use a new rendering backend with QQuickRenderControl, along with a new MLT module to handle the QML frames. I was able to cover most of the proposed work, I seek to continue working on it and finish evolving the titler tool.