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Interviews

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.”

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

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Podcasts: PodCTL, Tim O’Reilly and Ubuntu Podcast

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Interviews
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #44 – Looking at 3yrs of Kubernetes

    With Kubernetes recently celebrating it’s 3rd anniversary, we thought it would be a good idea to look back at what has made the project successful, the growth of the ecosystem, the adoption by companies around the world, as well as areas where the market feels that there is still room for improvement.

  • Ars on your lunch break: Tim O’Reilly on why the future doesn’t have to suck

    In today’s installment, Tim rejects the fashionable forecast that automation will eradicate all human jobs next week. Being closer than most of us to Jeff Bezos, he knows a thing or three about operations at Amazon, which presents a fascinating case in point.

    The company began a hugely successful two-year robot buying spree in 2014. The robots automated countless repetitive and dangerous human tasks. And during that time, the company hired more than 100,000 new people in its warehouses. It turns out, these robots amplify the productivity of the folks who work with them. And when bosses get more bang for their buck from a category of worker, they tend to hire more of them.

  • S11E21 – The Twenty-One Balloons

    It’s Season 11 Episode 21 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Mark Johnson are connected and speaking to your brain.

Review: The Linux Podcast Scene – all the movers and shakers

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Interviews

Podcasts are shows, similar to radio or TV shows, that are produced by professionals or amateurs and made available on the internet to stream and/or download. They have entered into a more mature phase.

Linux blogs and web sites carry a huge library of information to tap into about the Linux scene. Podcasts have some advantages (and disadvantages) over these resources. Portability is a key advantage of podcasts. You can be driving across states, or walking down the street, and keep up to date with the latest Linux scene.

It’s been a long time since we covered Linux podcasts. Sadly, some great shows have podfaded, but there’s new ones entering the scene. We’ve therefore compiled a fairly comprehensive roundup of active Linux-related podcasts. We don’t feature in this article podcasts that have stopped releasing new shows.

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Ars on your lunch break: Tim O‘Reilly discusses the birth of “open source”

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Interviews
OSS

Below, you’ll find the second installment of the After On interview with legendary tech publisher and prognosticator Tim O’Reilly. Please check out part one if you missed it. Otherwise, press play on the embedded player, or pull up the transcript—both of which are below.

O’Reilly and I start off today talking about The Whole Internet User’s Guide & Catalog, which he published in 1992. And yup—that’s a two at the end of that number. As in, a full year before the first release of the Mosaic browser. Of course, there was a World Wide Web before Mosaic—and all 200 of its sites are listed in this book (along with various non-WWW Internet stuff that was around back then).

Jumping forward many years, O’Reilly tells us about convening a small summit of tech honchos, which quite literally named open source software. The nameless-ish phenomenon was already a big deal by then and was destined to become a huge one. But names do matter (and their lack even more so). The summit’s real purpose was to stridently promote this new approach to code to the both industry and the press in hopes of terminating the suffocating reign of Microsoft and others.

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An Interview with Heptio, the Kubernetes Pioneers

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Server
Interviews

I recently spent some time chatting with Craig McLuckie, CEO of the leading Kubernetes solutions provider Heptio. Centered around both developers and system administrators, Heptio's products and services simplify and scale the Kubernetes ecosystem.

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Audiocasts/Shows: For The Record, Linux Foundation Show, and freeCodeCamp

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Interviews
  • Linux Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage – For The Record

    Linux Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage. Which is best and how do they differ? Does it matter? This article I did recently on Datamation is a good place to get started and helps shed some light on the differences between Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage for Linux.

  • The Use Cases for Blockchain, Real and Hypothetical

    Blockchain has finally gotten over the Wall Street hump. Now that BitCoin and Ethereum are essentially old news, the actual technology behind these commodities is beginning to trickle into real-world enterprise applications. Blockchain, it seems, has many useful use cases out there in the business world, and with the help of the Linux Foundation and IBM, enterprises can now take advantage of the open source Hyperledger implementation of blockchain technology.

  • freeCodeCamp

    Quincy is a teacher who founded freeCodeCamp.org in 2014. He leads the open source project, which millions of people use each month to learn to code and get developer jobs. Quincy didn't start programming until he was 31. Before that, he was a school director in the US and China.

Greg Kroah-Hartman on Linux, Security, and Making Connections at Open Source Summit

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

People might not think about the Linux kernel all that much when talking about containers, serverless, and other hot technologies, but none of them would be possible without Linux as a solid base to build on, says Greg Kroah-Hartman. He should know. Kroah-Hartman maintains the stable branch of the Linux kernel along with several subsystems. He is also co-author of the Linux Kernel Development Report, a Fellow at The Linux Foundation, and he serves on the program committee for Open Source Summit.

In this article, we talk with Kroah-Hartman about his long involvement with Linux, the importance of community interaction, and the upcoming Open Source Summit.

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Shedbuilt GNU/Linux: An Educational Distro Exclusively for ARM Boards

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Interviews

Shedbuilt is a new Linux distribution created exclusively for cheap ARM boards. It’s lead developer Auston sheds light on this new Linux project.
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Windstream's Nichols, Frane discuss why open source is important

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Interviews
OSS

While the road to virtualization has included potholes and bad signage, open source can provide the right roadmap, according to Windstream executives.

Although some service providers are still on the fence when it comes to using open source, Windstream Enterprise's Arthur Nichols, vice president of network architecture and technology, and Mike Frane, vice president of product development and portal, are believers.

Windstream is using open source technologies or applications from OpenStack, ONOS, Kafka, Message Bus and RabbitMQ, to name just a few. It's also a member of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) open source community.

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Also:

  • Istio: The New Open Source Cloud Hotness

    Expect to hear a lot more about Istio, an emerging open source technology for orchestrating microservices networking. The buzz is already building, says Kip Compton, senior vice president of Cisco's cloud platform and solutions group.

  • Mapping Open Source Governance Models

    If you would like to contribute some data about the governance on an open source project which is not listed there or you have more details about one which is already listed please don't hesitate to contribute. Create a pull request or an open an issue and I'll get the information added.

    This is a nice small fun project. SUSE Hack Week gives me a bit of time to work on it. If you would like to join, please get in touch.

Interview with Andrea Buso

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Interviews

In 2000, my brother, a computer programmer, made me try OpenSuse. I used Gimp, and I felt good because I could draw what I wanted and how I wanted. Since then, I have abandoned Windows for Linux and I have discovered a series of wonderful programs which allow me to work professionally, giving me the advantage of digital.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Planetary Annihilation, La-Mulana 2, SteamOS

Software: Castero, Skrooge, gtk-vnc

  • castero – command-line podcast player
    I’ve been tinkering with a few modern podcast players in the past few months. CPod, Vocal and Winds all use modern web technologies; in the case of CPod and Winds a combination of JavaScript weaved with the Electron framework. It’s only fair to take a different tack. castero differs fundamentally — it’s a command line podcast client. It’s designed to be easy to use and targeted at users who want lightweight command line applications instead of bloated GUI-based alternatives. castero lets you add podcasts via RSS feeds, and handles a large number of feeds. It’s released under an open source license. The software is written in the Python programming language.
  • Skrooge 2.15.0 released
    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.15.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.
  • gtk-vnc 0.9.0 release
    I’m pleased to announce a new release of GTK-VNC, version 0.9.0. This is a cleanup/modernization release. Note that the next release (1.0.0) will drop support for GTK-2

Graphics: Intel and AMD Developments

  • Intel Has Quietly Been Working On A New Gallium3D Driver Being Called "Iris"
    After resisting Gallium3D for the past decade with a preference on continuing to maintain their "i965" Mesa classic driver and all they've invested into its compiler stack and more, it seems times are changing as the open-source Intel team has been starting up development of a modern Gallium3D driver. This is not to be confused with the former i915g or i965g efforts from about a decade ago that were the experiments of Tungsten/LunarG for driver research/experimentation purposes or in the case of i915g to handle some features with LLVM in software, but this is a modern Gallium3D driver targeting their current hardware.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Linux Graphics Driver Released with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and RHEL / CentOS Support
    The long awaited AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 driver update for the AMD Linux graphics driver package has finally been released, with a driver installation option for both “all open” and closed / proprietary driver modules. What is great about this driver package update is that it is supported on the latest Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS as well as Ubuntu 16.04.5, and RHEL / CentOS 6.10 and 7.5 respectively for their Enterprise Linux support targets.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Released With Ubuntu 18.04.1 Support & WattMan-Like Functionality
    AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 is now available as the long desired update to this official AMD Linux graphics driver package that consists of the driver installation option for both the "all-open" and closed/proprietary driver modules. Notable to the AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 release is that Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS is now supported as well as Ubuntu 16.04.5. Additionally, RHEL/CentOS 6.10 and 7.5 release series round out their enterprise Linux support targets.

Wine 3.14 Released

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 3.14 is now available.
  • Wine 3.14 Adds DXTn Texture Decompression, Other Improvements
    Due to the summer holidays it's been four weeks since Wine 3.13 but it has now been succeeded by Wine 3.14 as the newest feature release. Wine 3.14 adds support for DXTn texture decompression, deferral support for MSI install actions, Japanese keyboard support within DirectInput, improvements to the standard task dialog, more Shell32 icons, and a total of 36 bug fixes. Those bug fixes range from Adobe CS4 issues to problems with Wargaming, Chromium, Guild Wars, Civilization V, Chaos League, and other software.
  • Grab a glass as Wine 3.14 is out today with DXTn texture decompression support and plenty of fixes
    The latest and greatest in fine Wine [Official Site] is out today with Wine 3.14 filled with features and the usual bug fixes including support for DXTn texture decompression