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Interviews

Richard Stallman: A Discussion on Freedom, Privacy & Cryptocurrencies

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Dr. Richard Stallman is well-known for his free software movement activism. His speeches and work revolve around a term: freedom. And it is precisely that word that prompted Stallman to launch the GNU Project, founding the Free Software Foundation and releasing the GNU General Public License, among other projects, to promote the free software concept.

RMS, as Dr. Stallman is also known, has some opinions regarding the concept of cryptocurrencies that have been widely discussed within the crypto community.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Kubernetes, Open Source Security Podcast and "Reflecting On My Linux Journey"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews
  • Physics, politics and Pull Requests: the Kubernetes 1.18 release interview

    The start of the COVID-19 pandemic couldn't delay the release of Kubernetes 1.18, but unfortunately a small bug could — thankfully only by a day. This was the last cat that needed to be herded by 1.18 release lead Jorge Alarcón before the release on March 25.

    One of the best parts about co-hosting the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google is the conversations we have with the people who help bring Kubernetes releases together. Jorge was our guest on episode 96 back in March, and just like last week we are delighted to bring you the transcript of this interview.

    If you'd rather enjoy the "audiobook version", including another interview when 1.19 is released later this month, subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts.

    In the last few weeks, we've talked to long-time Kubernetes contributors and SIG leads David Oppenheimer, David Ashpole and Wojciech Tyczynski. All are worth taking the dog for a longer walk to listen to!

  • Open Source Security Podcast/Josh Bressers: Episode 208 – Passwords are pollution

    Josh and Kurt talk about some of the necessary evils of security. There are challenges we face like passwords and resource management. Sometimes the problem is old ideas, sometimes it’s we don’t have metrics. Can you measure not getting hacked?

  • Reflecting On My Linux Journey And Where It May Lead

    I ramble a bit about my Linux journey. Well, not just my Linux journey since my story begins before Linux existed. And even in the parts of the story that involve my Linux years, the story is really more about my journey with "free and open source software".

Community Member Monday: Sandra Louvero

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

Today we’re talking to Sandra Louvero, who is helping to spread the word about LibreOffice and FOSS in Congo. Also, she recently became a Member of The Document Foundation, the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice…

[...]

In Pointe-Noire I belong to a community called “Librists”. Our goal is to help people discover the world of open source software here in Congo – which very few people know about. I am responsible for training people to use the LibreOffice suite, and we have named the training “SPRINT”, which lasts 60 days per component starting from Writer, Calc, Impress etc.

The aim of this sprint is to help users learn the applications, and get their comments, to then bring back to the LibreOffice Francophone community, to which I also belong. Then we can continue to improve LibreOffice.

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Also: LibreOffice GSoC Week 8 Report

Troubleshoot Linux kernel panic with kdump crash tool

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Kernel panic is a critical issue that manifests as a system freeze. If you're not familiar with what a kernel does, it is the core of an OS. Linux itself is a kernel, which enables developers to create numerous distributions.

A serious enough error at the kernel can cause an event known as kernel panic. This is similar to Window's blue screen of death, but instead of seeing a blue screen, you simply see a log output on a black screen.

Kernel panic can occur due to bad memory, driver crashes, malware or software bugs. To identify the cause of kernel panic, you can use the kdump service to collect crash dumps, perform a root cause analysis and troubleshoot the system.

To get started, you should have two VMs that run CentOS. This tutorial uses CentOS 8 as the Linux distribution for both the Network File System (NFS) server and client.

If you configure the client to send the crash dumps to an NFS share, you can centrally gather and analyze a crash dump without using the system that is affected by kernel panic.

Below are the IP addresses of the NFS server and client. Your addresses may differ depending on your subnet configuration, but both addresses are necessary.

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Interview – NXP Linux BSP and Timesys Vigiles Maintenance Service & Security Updates

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

Answer: The kernel strategy for NXP’s i.MX family BSPs closely follows the annual cadence of kernel.org’s LTS kernel selection. As soon as kernel.org establishes the next official LTS kernel version, NXP transitions our internal development to that particular kernel. However, the migration of the kernel is only one aspect of our next major release. There may be a number of associated updates to be included, such as a new version to Yocto, updates to U-Boot, and many other package changes we integrate into the Yocto release specific to the i.MX BSP. These factors, plus our rigorous testing process create an inevitable delay between the community version of the latest LTS kernel release and NXP’s i.MX board support package (BSP) based on that same kernel.

We must also consider a number of other factors that come into play between our planned cadence of Linux LTS kernel updates. NXP may introduce new products, or there may be updates to various packages, and of course, there are issue resolutions (including LTS minor version updates) to be considered. Our engineering team must balance all these factors while maintaining consistent quality standards for the entire i.MX product family being supported by each BSP release.

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PCLinuxOS Interview and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS
Interviews

Why and when did you start using Linux?
2005. The security issues with Windows XP were really blowing up at the time, so when I ordered a new computer for school I made sure to do so with a second drive planning on giving 'Nix a try. I started off on Ubuntu on that machine, and when I got a laptop a couple of years later I wanted to try something different and ran through a couple distros before settling on PCLinuxOS. It's become my everyday driver, and I now use Linux most of the time on my own machines simply because I like it better. I'm currently running Debian 10 and PCLinuxOS.

What specific equipment do currently use with PCLinuxOS?
This desktop has an AMD Ryzen 7 3800X, Radeon 580X graphics, Asus X570 mobo, and 64GB of G-Skill Ripjaws RAM. I also have a Nektar Impact GX61 MIDI controller keyboard and Focusrite Scarlett 4i4 audio interface connected to this machine since it's my production rig. I also have PCLinuxOS installed on a hand-me-down laptop (Lenovo Z580) that runs only Linux.

Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
I'm not sure how much using Linux has to do with it, but I've certainly become the tech support for my family... Outside of a few die-hards, I find that folks generally aren't too hung up on what OS you use. I use Windows, MacOS, and Linux daily and think each has its place, though I'd likely never use Windows at all on my own boxes if WINE support for games and a few audio programs was better.

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Also: [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu, Manjaro, Python Bytes and GNU World Order

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Interview with Albert Weand

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

A couple of years ago, I started to gain interest in GNU/Linux and even considered using it as my main OS. One of my priorities was to find a good painting application compatible with the system. I tried MyPaint and Gimp, but Krita was definitely the best option.

I really like the user interface, it’s very flexible. I like to keep things simple and just focus on the artwork. The shortcuts to navigate around the canvas are great, they feel very natural. There’s no need to change tools in order to zoom in, zoom out or move around the canvas. I also like the default brushes, they feel organic and the textures help to simulate real brushes in traditional painting.

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Interview with Clément Mona

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I wanted to try someting different and a friend of mine showed me Krita in 2017.

I loved how intuitive Krita is, I handled the program very fast, more over my Wacom tablet worked perfectly on it, and that was not the case with oher applications at this time.

I love how fast I can paint with Krita. Also, the brush customisation is very nice and complete.

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In Free Software, the Community is the Most Important Ingredient: Jerry Bezencon of Linux Lite [Interview]

Filed under
Interviews

Jerry Bezencon, the creator of Linux Lite project, shares some interesting details about this popular lightweight Linux distribution.
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

today's leftovers

  • Want Social Justice? The Free Software Movement Fights For Everyone!

    Everyone wants freedom but most people have no idea just how enslaved they have become to their computing devices and the proprietary software that controls those devices. The Free Software Movement aims to spread awareness of this issue and to advocate for the use of freedom-respecting software ("free software").

  • Participate in Hacktoberfest, Help Develop Contributions

    The month-long, virtual-festival event that celebrates open source contributions, Hacktoberfest, is coming soon and members of the openSUSE community can make a difference. The event that is in its seventh year and run by Digital Ocean and DEV encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects. The event is for developers, designers who contribute artwork, people who can contribute to documentation,and more. As the event brings more awareness to open-source projects and encourages contributions that benefit communities, having developers and community members available to help people who want to contribute can be beneficial to the project.

  • Are universities spending enough on cybersecurity? [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks “will absolutely continue”, said Mark Ford, who leads higher education risk and financial advisory services for the audit firm Deloitte. As higher education becomes known as an “easy target”, this increasingly “attracts the bad guys”, he explained.

    The threat comes not just from criminals seeking money. Universities now house arguably the most valuable secrets on earth – plans for a coronavirus vaccine – putting them in the sights of state-backed [cr]ackers. In July, UK, US and Canadian intelligence services warned that Russian groups were attempting to target Covid-19 vaccine research and development.

    This raises the question: are universities doing enough to defend themselves against [cr]acking?

  • vScaler Integrates SLURM with GigaIO FabreX for Elastic HPC Cloud Device Scaling
  • vScaler Announces SLURM integration with GigaIO FabreX

    The additional integration of the SLURM workload manager, an open-source job scheduler for Linux and Unix-like kernels, means that vScaler Cloud users can request traditional resources like memory and compute cores to be available for jobs.

  • Profiling slow-running queries in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility)

    Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) is a fast, scalable, highly available, and fully managed document database service that supports MongoDB workloads. You can use the same MongoDB 3.6 application code, drivers, and tools to run, manage, and scale workloads on Amazon DocumentDB without having to worry about managing the underlying infrastructure. As a document database, Amazon DocumentDB makes it easy to store, query, and index JSON data. AWS built Amazon DocumentDB to uniquely solve your challenges around availability, performance, reliability, durability, scalability, backup, and more. In doing so, we built several tools, like the profiler, to help you run analyze your workload on Amazon DocumentDB. The profiler gives you the ability to log the time and details of slow-running operations on your cluster. In this post, we show you how to use the profiler in Amazon DocumentDB to analyze slow-running queries to identify bottlenecks and improve individual query performance and overall cluster performance.

Programming Leftovers

  • Self-publishing and the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps

    Five years, 834 commits, and 24 major revisions later, I've just published the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps, a book which has now sold over 60,000 copies and spawned a popular free Ansible 101 video series on YouTube.

  • Open Standards Are Simple

    If you want to create a truly open standard, you _need_ to make it simple.

    There are no exceptions to this rule. When a standard becomes harder to fully implement than what your average motivated programmer can do in two months (max!), it _shouldn't_ be considered "open" anymore.

    Why?

  • In Which COVID-19 Misinformation Leads To A Bunch of Graphs Made With Rust

    A funny — and by funny, I mean sad — thing has happened. Recently the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has been analyzing data from the patchwork implementation of mask requirements in Kansas. They came to a conclusion that shouldn’t be surprising to anyone: masks help. They published a chart showing this. A right-wing propaganda publication got ahold of this, and claimed the numbers were “doctored” because there were two-different Y-axes. I set about to analyze the data myself from public sources, and produced graphs of various kinds using a single Y-axis and supporting the idea that the graphs were not, in fact, doctored. Here’s one graph that’s showing that: In order to do that, I had imported COVID-19 data from various public sources. Many states in the US are large enough to have significant variation in COVID-19 conditions, and many of the source people look at don’t show county-level data over time. I wanted to do that.

  • Basics of Working with the SQLite Database in Python

    A database is one of the most useful and popular files for storing data; they can be used to store any kind of data, including text, numbers, images, binary data, files, etc. SQLite is a relational database management system based on the SQL language. It is a C library, and it provides an API to work with other programming languages, including Python. It does not require a separate server process to be run as needed in large database engines like MySQL and Postgresql. It is swift and lightweight, and the entire database is stored in a single disk file, which makes it portable like CSV or other data storage files. Many applications use SQLite for internal data storage, mainly in environments like mobile devices or small applications.

  • Perl 7 By Default

    Perl 7 has been announced as the next direction of Perl development. My previous blog post explored at a high level the risks and benefits of the announced direction, as well as those of a more incremental proposal. The primary and critical difference between these two approaches is the decision to change interpreter defaults in an incompatible manner. I would like to explore each of the arguments presented for this design choice.

  • CY's Recent Submission for PWC(068-073)

    Skipped blogging on Perl Weekly Challenge(PWC) for a few weeks!

  • SSH vs. kubectl exec

    There’s a lot of similarities between SSH and kubectl, and both have their strengths and weaknesses. While SSH is architecturally set in stone, higher-level software can learn a thing or two from Kubernetes about centralized configuration when managing a fleet of machines. See Teleport for an example of how this can be done. SSH could also borrow the credential management approach from kubeconfigs (i.e. “put all my client creds and server info into one file that I can copy around”).

    kubectl could improve on its non-shell features like port forwarding and file transfer. It’s raw data throughput is also lacking, which precludes it from becoming a transport-layer protocol like SSH. In practice, these tools are complementary and get used for different tasks, it’s not “one or the other”. I hope this post helped you learn something new about both!

  • Can we do better than our C compiler?

    Today, I wanted to become a C compiler. I added a hand-compiled assembly version of echo from our previous coding exercise and added a new make target, make asm, that will assemble it. Let's look at our hand-compiled assembly and compare it to our C compiler and ask whether or not it was worth it.

  • Benign Data Races Considered Harmful

    The series of posts about so called benign data races stirred a lot of controversy and led to numerous discussions at the startup I was working at called Corensic. Two bastions formed, one claiming that no data race was benign, and the other claiming that data races were essential for performance. Then it turned out that we couldn’t even agree on the definition of a data race. In particular, the C++11 definition seemed to deviate from the established notions.

  • Micronaut 2.0 Full-Stack Java Framework Released

    The Micronaut framework uses Java's annotation processors, which work with any JVM language that supports them, as well as an HTTP server and client built on the Netty non-blocking I/O client server framework. To provide a programming model similar to Spring and Grails, these annotation processors pre-compile the required metadata to perform DI, define AOP proxies, and configure applications to run in a low-memory environment, the company says. Many of the APIs in Micronaut were "heavily inspired" by Spring and Grails," which was by design and aids in bringing developers up to speed quickly," the company says.

  • Understanding computer vision and AI, part 1

    An active area in the field of computer vision is object detection, where the goal is to not only localize objects of interest within an image but also assign a label to each of these objects of interest. Considerable recent successes in the area of object detection stem from modern advances in deep learning, particularly leveraging deep convolutional neural networks. Much of the initial focus was on improving accuracy, leading to increasingly more complex object detection networks such as SSD, R-CNN, Mask R-CNN, and other extended variants of these networks. While such networks demonstrated state-of-the-art object detection performance, they were very challenging, if not impossible, to deploy on edge and mobile devices due to computational and memory constraints. This greatly limits the widespread adoption for a wide range of applications such as robotics, video surveillance, autonomous driving where local embedded processing is required. [...] Model Evaluation is an integral part of the model development process. It helps to find the best model that represents our data and how well the chosen model performs on unseen data. To improve the model we tune the hyper-parameters; parameter that determines the network structure (number of neurons in the network, network activation functions) or training parameter (gradient descent learning rate, adding parameters like momentum in the weight update rule). Tuning those parameters is an inevitable and important step to obtain better performance. Methods like GridSearch and RandomizedSearch can be used to navigate through the different parameters.

  • Qt Design Studio 1.6 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the beta release of Qt Design Studio 1.6 Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs. Both designers and developers use Qt Design Studio and this makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined. To get an impression, you should watch this video.

Raspberry Pi Projects and News