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Interviews

How I built and maintain Cantata, an open source music player

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Interviews
OSS

This is the third in a series of conversations with developers who build and maintain open source music players. Craig Drummond is the developer and maintainer of Cantata, an open source music player that acts as a frontend (client) to the Music Player Daemon (MPD) music server. I have two small headless computers at home configured as music servers—one connected to our stereo in our living room, one in my upstairs office. I first ran into Cantata while I was looking for a way to control these servers, and wow, it is one impressive piece of work.

I was interested in learning more about Cantata, so I was grateful when Craig agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity). Without further ado, let’s chat with Craig.

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Fedora at 15: Why Matthew Miller sees a bright future for the Linux distribution

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Red Hat
Interviews

Fedora—as a Linux distribution—will celebrate the 15th anniversary of its first release in November, though its technical lineage is much older, as Fedora Core 1 was created following the discontinuation of Red Hat Linux 9 in favor of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

That was a turbulent time in Red Hat history, and Fedora has had its own share of turbulence as well. Since becoming project leader in June 2014, Matthew Miller had led the Fedora.next initiative, intended to guide the second decade of the Fedora project. That initiative resulted in the creation of separate Fedora Workstation, Server, and Cloud editions—the latter of which has since been replaced with CoreOS—as well as the addition of an Internet of Things (IoT) edition.

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Drupal shows leadership on diversity and inclusion

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Interviews
Drupal

Drupal is far from alone among open source communities with a diversity gap, and I think it deserves a lot of credit for tackling these issues head-on. Diversity and inclusion is a much broader topic than most of us realize. Before I read DDI's August newsletter, the history of indigenous people in my community was something that I hadn't really thought about before. Thanks to DDI's project, I'm not only aware of the people who lived in Maryland long before me, but I've come to appreciate and respect what they brought to this land.

I encourage you to learn about the native people in your homeland and record their history in DDI's Land Acknowledgements blog. If you're a member of another open source project, consider replicating this project there. The more we know about people who differ from us, the more we respect and appreciate our collective roles as members of the human race.

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Interview with Fabian Mosakowski

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KDE
Interviews

My name is Fabian Mosakowski and I’m an aspiring illustrator living in France. I’m currently working on my portfolio creating an illustrated fantasy tale called “If Only Blood Was Red”. It deals with what’s left of humans thriving to survive in a land that doesn’t welcome them.

Currently as a hobby artist. I made a few comissions for close relatives but I’d like to make it professional once my portfolio will be done.

Mainly fantasy as it’s the narrative thread of my project but I also mix it with dark art, another genre I really enjoy, to fit the story atmosphere. I also occasionnally work in vectorial or comic book style for lighter projects.

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How a business was built on podcasts for Linux: The story of Jupiter Broadcasting

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

I spend a lot of time on the road and enjoy listening to podcasts about a variety of topics. One of my interests is keeping up with the latest news and information about Linux and open source, and that led me to Jupiter Broadcasting, an open source (both in topics covered and its own license) podcasting network. I met Jupiter's cofounder Chris Fisher when I visited System76's Denver headquarters in late 2018.

Jupiter Broadcasting emerged from The Linux Action Show, a podcast that began in 2006 and ended 10 years later in early 2017. The show was such a success that, in 2008, Chris and co-founder Bryan Lunduke decided to start Jupiter Broadcasting. Back then, the company only had two shows, The Linux Action Show and CastaBlasta. Now it offers 10 Linux-related podcasts with titles like Linux Headlines, Linux Action News, Choose Linux, Coder Radio, Self-Hosted, and more.

I was interested in learning more about Jupiter, so I was grateful when Chris agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity).

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through, Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Talk Python to Me

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Interviews
  • SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at SparkyLinux 5.9. Enjoy!

  • 2019-10-10 | Linux Headlines

    The Tor Project blacklists old relays, GitLab plans to introduce telemetry, Steam is working on a new multiplayer feature, The Matrix Project announces new funding, and AMP is getting a new home.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E27 – Exile

    This week we’ve been playing LEGO Worlds and tinkering with Thinkpads. We round up the news and goings on from the Ubuntu community, introduce a new segment, share some events and discuss our news picks from the tech world.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 27 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Talk Python to Me: #233 The Masonite Python Web Framework

    Folks, it's not like the old days where there were just a couple of web frameworks for building apps with Python. These days there are many. One of those frameworks is the Masonite web framework created by Joseph Mancuso. Joseph is here today to tell us all about Masonite, what makes it special, it's core value proposition for web developers and much more.

Audiocasts/Shows: Xfce 4.14 Desktop, TLLTS and Jupiter Shows

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Interviews
  • What’s New in Xfce 4.14 Desktop

    After 4 years and 5 months of development, Xfce 4.14 was finally released. a release that it is probably included in the software repositories of almost all Linux-based operating systems. The goal for Xfce 4.14, as the developers explain, was to port all of the core components to the latest GTK3 and GDBus open-source technologies, instead of the old GTK2 and D-Bus Glib.

    Window manager Xfce 4.14, now support VSync to reduce display flickering. It also now supports HiDPI, NVIDIA proprietary/closed source drivers, XInput2. XFCE 4.14 also introduces a new default theme.

    A new default theme is present as well in Xfce 4.14, and the Thunar file manager now features a completely revamped pathbar, BluRay support for the volume manager, support for larger thumbnails, improved keyboard navigation, and support for a “folder.jpg” file to alter the folder’s icon.

    XFCE 4.14 Panel got support for RandR’s primary monitor feature, improved window grouping in the tasklist plugin (better UX, visual group indicator etc), a per-panel “icon-size” setting, a new default clock format. Users can also now change the orientation of the icons on the desktop, as well as to preview Fujifilm RAF images in the file manager.

  • Home Network Under $200 | Self-Hosted 3

    How far can you get with a Raspberry Pi 4? We go all in and find out.

    Plus our favorite travel router with WireGuard built in, and Chris kicks off Project Off-Grid. Meanwhile, Alex adopts proprietary software.

  • Lack Rack, Jack | BSD Now 319

    Causing ZFS corruption for fun, NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial, The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers, a new OmniOS Community Edition LTS has been published, List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style, Project Trident 19.10 available, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828
  • 2019-10-09 | Linux Headlines

    SUSE drops OpenStack Cloud, OpenLibra looks to piggyback on Facebook's cryptocurrency, OpenSSH adds in-RAM protections and Essential teases flashy new phone.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, mintCast and Chat With Executive Producer at Linux Academy

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Interviews
  • Just Enough VPN | LINUX Unplugged 322

    We reveal our secrets for bridging networks with WireGuard and Linux-powered networking.

    Plus the future of OpenPGP in Thunderbird, a disappointing update for the Atari VCS, and a shiny new Spotify client for your terminal.

  • mintCast 319 – New Mumble

    First up, in our Wanderings, I talk Dynamic DNS, Tony is writing articles, Moss test drives EndeavourOS, Josh visited Media City, and Joe relaxes with fiction.

    Then, our news: CentOS 8 and Mumble 1.3 are released, Ubuntu 19.10 is almost here, the GNOME Foundation and Docker navigate rough seas, and more.

  • A Chat with Angela Fisher | Jupiter Extras 21

    Brent sits down with Angela Fisher, Executive Producer at Linux Academy, Jupiter Broadcasting co-founder, co-host of many JB productions including The FauxShow, and Tech Talk Today, among others. We touch on a variety of topics including the early beginnings of Jupiter Broadcasting, the origins of Brunch with Brent, aswell as many that are closer to her heart - from painting to parenting.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Full Circle Weekly News, Linux Headlines and Feren OS Next KDE Beta 3 Run Through

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Python Podcast and Linux Headlines

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Interviews
  • Going Linux #378 · Zorin Review

    Our review of of Zorin OS includes a give-away of one copy of Zorin Ultimate.

  • Network Automation At Enterprise Scale With Python

    Designing and maintaining enterprise networks and the associated hardware is a complex and time consuming task. Network automation tools allow network engineers to codify their workflows and make them repeatable. In this episode Antoine Fourmy describes his work on eNMS and how it can be used to automate enterprise grade networks. He explains how his background in telecom networking led him to build an open source platform for network engineers, how it is architected, and how you can use it for creating your own workflows. This is definitely worth listening to as a way to gain some appreciation for all of the work that goes on behind the scenes to make the internet possible.

  • 2019-10-07 | Linux Headlines

    The FSF is looking for some direction, StackStorm joins the Linux Foundation, and GNOME users who like it a little traditional get some good news.

    Plus the Pinebook Pro starts shipping to customers, and more.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices/Open Hardware

  • Site.js and Pi

    Chatting about Pi, on a Pi, with a chat server running on Site.js on the same Pi.

  • This MicroATX Motherboard is Based on Phytium FT2000/4 Arm Desktop SoC @ 3.0 GHz
  • Rikomagic R6 Review – Part 1: Android Mini Projector’s Unboxing and First Boot

    Rikomagic R6 is a mini Android projector that looks like a vintage radio, or depending on your point of view a mini vintage television.

  • Brief on Behalf of Amicus Curiae Open Source Hardware Association in Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc., No. 18-2214 (Fed. Cir.)

    Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc. is a case of first impression for the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The question on appeal is whether a design patent’s scope is tied to the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. In this amicus brief, the Open Source Hardware Association (“OSHWA”) explains the potential effects on open source hardware development, and design practice generally, of untethering design patent protection from the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. A large percentage of open-source hardware combines both ornamental and functional elements, and industrial design routinely involves applying design concepts from disparate fields in novel ways. To engage in this practice, open-source hardware designers need to know the universe of available source material and its limits. Further, understanding the licensing requirements of open-source hardware begins with understanding how the elements that make up that hardware may or may not be protected by existing law. Accordingly, while many creators of open-source hardware do not seek patent protection for their own creations, an understandable scope of design patent protection is nonetheless essential to their ability to collaborate with other innovators and innovate lawfully. The brief argues that the District Court in the case—and every district court that has considered the issue—correctly anchored the patented design to the article of manufacture when construing the patent. The brief explains that anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture is the best approach, for several reasons. Connecting the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture calibrates the scope of design patent protection to the patentee’s contribution over the prior art. It avoids encumbering the novel and nonobvious application of prior designs to new articles of manufacture, a fundamental and inventive practice of industrial design. It aligns the scope of design patent protection with its purpose: encouraging the inventive application of a design to an article of manufacture. This balances protection for innovative designs with later innovators’ interest in developing future designs. Finally, anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture helps fulfill design patent law’s notice function by clarifying the scope of protection.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling. As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops. While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • CentOS 8 Package Management with DNF on the Command Line
  • AdamW’s Debugging Adventures: “dnf is locked by another application”
  • Managing user accounts with Cockpit
  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 ISO image to install on VirtualBox VM
  • GNU poke: Dealing with alternatives - Unions in Poke

    Computing with data whose form is not the most convenient way to be manipulated, like is often the case in unstructured binary data, requires performing a preliminary step that transforms the data into a more convenient representation, usually featuring a higher level of abstraction. This step is known in computer jargon as unmarshalling, when the data is fetch from some storage or transmission media or, more generally, decoding. Once the computation has been performed, the result should be transformed back to the low-level representation to be stored or transmitted. This is performed in a closing step known as marshalling or, more generally, encoding. Consider the following C program whose purpose is to read a 32-bit signed integer from a byte-oriented storage media at a given offset, multiply it by two, and store the result at the same offset.

  • Android NDK r21 moves to beta

    Android announced that NDK r21 is now in beta. Android NDK is a toolset for implementing parts of an app in native code. The release — which is the first long term support release — includes improved defaults for better security and performance. One of the key features in the release is an update to GNU Make to version 4.2, which provides a number of bug fixes, and enables ‘–output-sync’ to avoid interleaving output with error messages, the team explained. This is enabled by default with ndk-build. Additionally, GDB, the GNU project debugger, has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

  • What is the history behind C Programming and Unix?

    If you think C programming and Unix are unrelated, then you are making a big mistake. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, if the Unix engineers at Bell Labs had decided to use another programming language instead of C to develop a new version of Unix, then we would be talking about that language today. The relationship between the two is simple; Unix is the first operating system that is implemented with a high-level C programming language, got its fame and power from Unix. Of course, our statement about C being a high-level programming language is not true in today’s world. This article is an excerpt from the book Extreme C by Kamran Amini. Kamran teaches you to use C’s power. Apply object-oriented design principles to your procedural C code. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You’ll also understand how C works with UNIX, how to implement OO principles in C, and what multiprocessing is.

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability. But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers. But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined. After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff. [...] Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.