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Interviews

Is your open source community optimized for contributors?

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Interviews
Moz/FF
OSS

Josh Matthews is a platform developer at Mozilla. He's a programmer who writes Rust code and is active in the development of Firefox. His development experience has led him to enjoy mentoring new contributors in open source projects.

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Teaching teachers to teach open source

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Interviews
OSS

This seems obvious, but the ability to learn independently is very important to successful student participation in HFOSS projects. Students have to be able to learn in a variety of manners from a range of different sources, and they need to take ownership of their learning in order to flourish in an open source community.

Communication, teamwork and the ability to problem solve are also critical skills. While understanding technologies such as version control is emphasized by most open source communities, students who don't understand how to navigate a professional environment by communicating clearly or who can't work on a team won't even get to the point of using those technologies. These process skills can sometimes be more difficult to teach than teaching a student Java.

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Linux founder Torvalds on the Internet of Things: Security plays second fiddle

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Linux
Interviews

This development caught Torvald, Linux's founder, by surprise -- 15 years ago. "I never see the entire chain running Linux. Twenty five years ago I started Linux wanting a workstation. From that to a server wasn't a surprise. There was no single point where I was surprised, but 15 years ago I started seeing these odd, embedded systems. The first one that really caught my eye was a gas pump running Linux."

Today, Torvalds continued, "Many changes have been invisible. Even I don't see all the uses of Linux."

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Matt Lee of GNU Social

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GNU
Interviews

GNU social was created as a companion to my earlier project, GNU FM, which we created to build the social music platform, Libre.fm. After only a few short months, Libre.fm had over 20,000 users and I realized I didn't want to be another social media silo like MySpace or Facebook, so I came up with this vague idea called GNU social. A few prototypes were built, and eventually we started making GNU social as a series of plugins for Evan Prodromou's StatusNet project, with some help from Ian Denhardt, Craig Andrews and Steven DuBois. Later, StatusNet, GNU social and Free&Social (a fork of StatusNet) would merge into a single project called GNU social. If that sounds confusing and convoluted, it is.

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Linux at 25: Q&A With Linus Torvalds

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Linux
Interviews

Linus Torvalds created the original core of the Linux operating system in 1991 as a computer science student at the University of Helsinki in Finland. Linux rapidly grew into a full-featured operating system that can now be found running smartphones, servers, and all kinds of gadgets. In this e-mail interview, Torvalds reflects on the last quarter century and what the next 25 years might bring.

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Also: Linux at 25: Why It Flourished While Others Fizzled

Ubuntu being pulled into “game changing” areas – Canonical CEO

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical, said developers are now targeting the company’s Ubuntu platform for “game changing” areas such as Network Function Virtualisation and Internet of Things.

Last month, the company significantly boosted its convergence strategy, unveiling the first Ubuntu-powered tablet, from European vendor BQ, following earlier launches in the smartphone space.

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Q&A: Dinsmore sees open source Apache Spark moving to new stage

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Interviews

First of all, there is no question that open source is becoming more pervasive in the enterprise stacks. And open source is part of the DNA of Hadoop. It is an essential part of the business model of Hadoop.

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Ballmer on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Interview with Bermon Painter: On design and shutting down BlendConf

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Interviews
OSS

Make it easy for designers to contribute to your open source project by putting the landing pages and documentation on your repository. Then, then link to that repository from your main site with messaging catered to designers that encourages contributions.

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Why updating Android without vendor help is a nightmare

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Android
Interviews

The operating system runs on billions of smartphones and tablets, made by all sorts of companies. It primarily targets the ARM platform. A count can only be kept when a device is activated and many users choose not to do so.

Android is based on the Linux kernel which is released under the GNU General Public Licence version 2 and is free software; modifications can be made but if the modified binary kernel is distributed then the source needs to be made available too. All other components are released under the Apache licence, which means that there is no obligation to divulge any changes; in short, these can be locked away.

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