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Interviews

Interviews with FLOSS developers: Elena Grandi

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Interviews
Debian

One of fresh additions to Debian family, and thus wider FLOSS family is Elena Grandi. She is from realms of Valhalla and is setting her footprint into the community. A hacker mindset, a Free software lover and a 3D printing maker. Elena has big dedication to make the world free and better place for all. She tries to push limits on personal level with much care and love, and FLOSS community will benefit from her work and way of life in future. So what has the Viking lady to say about FLOSS? Meet Elena "of Valhalla" Grandi.

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Developer lowers Drupal's barrier to entry

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Interviews
Drupal

From a consumer perspective, I'd like open source to be ubiquitous to the point of invisibility. Using recent Ubuntu distros, I'm always shocked at how professional the environment feels. Just five years ago, you'd need to hunt down drivers and do a bunch of fiddling to get basic things like a sound card working. Now there are so many pushbutton ways to deploy open source tech, from OSes to CMS distros on Pantheon to buying an Android-powered mobile phone.

We're not quite to the point where CMS users can feel like open source is transparent; there's still a huge investment in vendors to give you the expertise to manage your Drupal or WordPress site, for example. But we're closer than we were a decade ago, and that's pretty exciting.

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Ubuntu on the Mainframe: Interview with Canonical's Dustin Kirkland

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Dustin Kirkland, from Canonical's Ubuntu Product and Strategy team, told me in a long interview at LinuxCon, "We are really steamrolling towards a GA release of Ubuntu on z Systems. Users of z Series systems are the types that buy hardware for 5 and 10 years and that lines up very well with our LTS of Ubuntu.” He also said they need to do some work on tool chain to ensure they have components like gclib libraries on all of the compilers, including other bits such as Perl, PHP, Ruby, Python, etc., which are needed to build the Ubuntu universe. Users will start seeing that work coming out later this year and alpha/beta builds of Ubuntu in early 2016.

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LinuxCon exclusive: Mark Shuttleworth says Snappy was born long before CoreOS and the Atomic Project

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has always been about developers. It has been about enabling the free software platform from where it is collaboratively built to be available at no cost to developers in the world, so they are limited only by their imagination—not by money, not by geography.

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How I use Android: Nova Launcher developer Kevin Barry

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Android
Interviews

That guy is a Chicagoan named Kevin Barry. Barry got started doing indie-level Android development while still working for someone else as a software developer during the day. He eventually started making more money with his early Android efforts than he was making with his "real" job -- and thus, TeslaCoil Software was born. (Little known fact: TeslaCoil is named after Barry's cat, Tesla -- who was named after a certain Nikola who also bore that name.)

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The problem with Linux text-to-speech (TTS)

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Linux
Interviews

It has never even been a serious contender in the race. In my opinion, most TTS applications in Linux have remained in hobbyist mode since inception. And I'm sure that statement will chap the ass of many, but a simple comparison between all of the Linux programs using TTS vs. Mac, Windows, and even the mobile market will bear me out. Hopefully we can raise enough awareness to at least see some forward movement on TTS in Linux. Hopefully.

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Teaching DevOps and open source to a new generation

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Interviews
OSS

We had the chance to interview Lance Albertson, the director of Open Source Lab (OSL) at Oregon State University (OSU), who is at LinuxCon this year to speak about what they do to help their students bridge this skill gap and how they work with open source projects to train the next generation of people who will keep the Internet running.

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How open source helped one woman break into the tech industry

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Interviews
OSS

Open source communities have been paving the way for innovation for years, and recently they've been paving the way for diversity in the IT fields, too. For some women, the way into technology was clear and well-lit. Others faced harsh criticism from their families, friends, and society. Thankfully, open source communities are creating a level playing field, enabling women from all over the world to learn, contribute, and make their mark in technology.

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LinuxCon Preview: Q&A with IBM’s Ross Mauri

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Linux
Interviews

As a preview to next week’s LinuxCon, we spoke with Ross Mauri, General Manager, IBM z Systems, about how open infrastructures drive innovation and IBM’s commitment to open ecosystems.

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Founder of Open Source Hardware Association shares her story

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Interviews
OSS

Alicia Gibb has a passion for hardware hacking—she founded and is currently running the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). Also a member of the ADA Initiative Board, Defensive Patent License Board, and the Open Source Ecology Board, she got her start as a technologist from a combination of backgrounds: informatics and library science.

Alicia formerly worked as a researcher and prototyper at Bug Labs where she ran the academic research program and the R&D lab. Her work is fascinating and she graciously agreed to this interview.

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today's leftovers

  • Permabit Debuts Only Complete Data Reduction for the Linux Storage Stack
    Permabit Technology Corporation, the leader in data reduction technology, today announced the latest release of its Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) software, VDO 6. The newest release of VDO delivers the company's patented deduplication, HIOPS Compression™ and thin provisioning in a commercial software package for Linux, expanding availability beyond the OEM marketplace to include the leading Professional Services organizations that are enabling today's modern Hybrid Cloud data centers.
  • My KIWI/OBS talk from oSC'16
    Last Friday, at openSUSE Conference 2016, I was giving a talk together with Christian Schneemann about KIWI and OBS (the events.opensuse.org software is not able to manage "two speakers for one talk", this is why I am not listed in the schedule).
  • AppliedMicro Announces the Availability of its Mudan Storage Platform at Red Hat Summit 2016
  • AsteroidOS smartwatch OS wants you, developers
    AsteroidOS is a new open source operating system specifically designed to serve software application development on smartwatches. The project is now gaining some traction and has been reported to now be looking for developer and community contribution engagement.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • GitHub Visualizes the Impact of Open Source
    Code repository GitHub published data visualizations that show the impact of open source development on hosted projects, along with the "shape" of project activity. The visualizations emphasize the effect of teamwork, collaboration and communication that reinforce coding efforts.
  • Meet Codemoji: Mozilla’s New Game for Teaching Encryption Basics with Emoji
    The above message may seem like a random string of emoji. But not so: When decoded, it reads: “Encryption Matters.” Today, Mozilla is launching Codemoji, a fun, educational tool that introduces everyday Internet users to ciphers — the basic building blocks of encryption — using emoji.
  • DSS, Inc. Releases New Version of Open Source EHR, vxVistA, to Healthcare IT Community
  • GuixSD system tests
  • Self-driving cars and open source - what about GPLv3 and anti-tivoization?
    Primarily, the car manufacturers say that their dislike of the GPLv3 software is due to security issues. According to them, it should not be possible for the car owners to modify the software of the car because this could lead to exposing the users themselves and other road users to danger. In the light of the above, is seems reasonable to question whether security considerations is actually the true reason for the car manufacturers not wanting the users to run their own software on the cars’ hardware. For many years, car owners have replaced parts of their cars, e.g. tires, brakes and even software – which is supported by the car industry. To give an example, there is a large market for the replacement or modification (“remapping”) of the Engine Control Units (“ECU”) software of cars. The ECU’s are computers that control the car’s engine, including fuel mix, fuel supply and gearing. The car industry takes advice and uses data from companies which offer ECU remapping and thereby indirectly supporting the companies although – according to the car industry – changes to the engine allegedly can pose a security risk. Another aspect of the matter is that stating that the clause in GPLv3 absolutely prohibits the car fabricants from forbidding the users running their own software on the hardware of the cars is not completely true. Section 7 of GPLv3 makes it possible for the creators of GPL programs to give the car factories an extra license under which it is possible to use the GPLv3 software in their cars without having to comply with the former-mentioned obligation to provide the installation information to the users of the cars. The way the system works now, the car industry allows modifications of cars which may cause a loss of security. It is possible to develop GPLv3 software that the car fabricants can use without having to allow the car owners modifications. Furthermore, it is only GPLv3 – and therefore not other FOSS licenses – which on a general level forces the car manufacturers to allow modifications of their software. The question of the security level of the cars should hardly be a hindrance to the use of FOSS in self-propelled cars. If the car fabricants could realize this, the many advantages of the freely-available source code could clear the way for the technology generally being adopted faster.
  • Open Source: It’s Not Just About Software Anymore
    Open source is no longer just about the software that sits on your computer. Open methods are being used to develop everything from better automobiles to life altering medical devices.
  • Kickstarting open source steampunk clocks that use meters to tell the time
    Kyle writes, "The Volt is a fully open source, arduino-based, handmade analog clock that tells time with meters. Available in a DIY install kit, 2 pre-made models, and a mix & match hardware option. The clocks are but with solid black walnut and maple, with faceplates produced in brass, copper, and steel. Only on Kickstarter!"
  • Libarchive Security Flaw Discovered
    When it comes to security, everyone knows you shouldn't run executable files from an untrustworthy source. Back in the late 1990s, when web users were a little more naive, it was quite common to receive infected email messages with fake attachments.

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