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Interviews

Open source licensing at GitHub

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Interviews
OSS

Open source licensing is important to GitHub in two ways: First, as the host of the world's largest collection of code, we have a unique opportunity—and arguably an obligation based on that opportunity—to do what we can to support the open source community, and that obviously includes open source licensing. Second, as a company built on open source, it's important that the open source code we depend on and the code we contribute to the open source community are both properly licensed so that others can use it. After all, that's the point of open source.

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Red Hat ‘plays well with others’

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Red Hat
Interviews

While Red Hat, Inc. has its own public Cloud strategy, it also plays well with others, according to Jason Nash, director of Next Gen Architectures at Sirius Computer Systems, Inc.

“Red Hat says: ‘Run this on whatever you want to run it on,'” Nash told theCUBE at the Red Hat Summit in Boston, Mass.

“People like that level of choice,” added Nash. “Red Hat has an advantage because a lot of times they’ll make it easy before the community makes it easy, and it’s what a lot of customers want.”

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Docker reveals its secret to success

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Interviews
OSS

The architectural change in Cloud computing sparked by Docker is a rare occurrence. And a few key practices made Docker, Inc. successful enough to bring about this critical change. First, Docker realized the importance of agility in infrastructure and capitalized on this.

Businesses like Amazon proved that using an agile application is critical to business survival. “If you’re not trying to learn how to take advantage of agile infrastructure, of agile applications, you’re going to be left behind,” Scott Johnston, SVP of Product at Docker, told theCube at DockerCon 2015.

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How To Get Started In Open Source

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Red Hat
Interviews

Gaining entry to the open-source community can seem daunting to customers unfamiliar with the territory. Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said that might be because they don’t understand that it isn’t just one large community, but several different ones.

“There are thousands of open-source communities, and the each have their own culture. They each have their own norms, ways of working, you know, personalities. And breaking in isn’t easy,” Whitehurst said.

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More Red Hat:

Why we changed our software from proprietary to open source

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Interviews
OSS

Why would a software company choose to change its product from proprietary to open source? It turns out there are many good reasons, says Dan Mihai Dumitriu, CEO and CTO of networking software company Midokura. In this interview with The Enterprisers Project, Dumitriu explains the benefits.

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The Linux Setup - Neil McGovern, Debian Project Leader

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Interviews
Debian

I’m the current Debian Project Leader—which is a very impressive title that boils down to being a figurehead for the Debian project.

I first started getting involved with Debian in 2003, and have wended my way through various roles in the project, from designing t-shirts to being the Release Manager for the last three releases, Lenny, Squeeze and Wheezy.

In my day job, I’m the engineering manager for Collabora, an open source software consultancy which is fairly similar—basically making sure that all the engineers are happy and helping unblock any problems that come along.

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Ground zero for an open-source revolution

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Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

For a relatively small company, Red Hat, inc. has become a major player in open source technology.

“It is definitely more than a Linux company,” said theCUBE cohost Dave Vellante, summarizing day one of Red Hat Summit 2015. “This conference is ground zero for an open-source revolution.”

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Also: Red Hat Summit kicks off with PaaS focus

Exclusive interview with Hans de Raad

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Interviews
OSS

In my daily life (both personal and professional) I use open source for just about anything, from LibreOffice to Drupal, Kolab, Piwik, Apache, KDE, etc.

Being part of the communities of these projects for me is a very special extra dimension that creates a lot of extra motivation and satisfaction.

For me, open source isn’t so much of a choice it is simply the standard.

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Q&A: Zipcar founder Robin Chase on open source and the collaboration economy

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Interviews
OSS

Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur known for founding the transportation related companies such as Zipcar, Buzzcar and Veniam. She wears many hats and is an inspiration to women all around the globe. She is also a strong supporter of Open Source and Open Collaborative technologies. She recently authored a book called Peers Inc: How People and Platforms Are Inventing the Collaborative Economy and Reinventing Capitalism. Chase will be delivering a keynote at the upcoming LinuxCon event.

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Learn OpenStack with Linux Foundation Instructor Tim Serewicz

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Linux
Interviews

When Tim Serewicz started teaching Linux system administration classes at IBM, his boss thought Linux was “just a fad." Serewicz has since made a full-time career out of teaching admins the latest technologies in the ever-evolving and growing Linux ecosystem. He has taught at IBM, Sun Microsystems, Oracle, and Red Hat and now teaches OpenStack and Linux performance and tuning courses for Linux Foundation Training.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.