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Interviews

LinuxCon exclusive: Mark Shuttleworth says Snappy was born long before CoreOS and the Atomic Project

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has always been about developers. It has been about enabling the free software platform from where it is collaboratively built to be available at no cost to developers in the world, so they are limited only by their imagination—not by money, not by geography.

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How I use Android: Nova Launcher developer Kevin Barry

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Android
Interviews

That guy is a Chicagoan named Kevin Barry. Barry got started doing indie-level Android development while still working for someone else as a software developer during the day. He eventually started making more money with his early Android efforts than he was making with his "real" job -- and thus, TeslaCoil Software was born. (Little known fact: TeslaCoil is named after Barry's cat, Tesla -- who was named after a certain Nikola who also bore that name.)

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The problem with Linux text-to-speech (TTS)

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Linux
Interviews

It has never even been a serious contender in the race. In my opinion, most TTS applications in Linux have remained in hobbyist mode since inception. And I'm sure that statement will chap the ass of many, but a simple comparison between all of the Linux programs using TTS vs. Mac, Windows, and even the mobile market will bear me out. Hopefully we can raise enough awareness to at least see some forward movement on TTS in Linux. Hopefully.

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Teaching DevOps and open source to a new generation

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Interviews
OSS

We had the chance to interview Lance Albertson, the director of Open Source Lab (OSL) at Oregon State University (OSU), who is at LinuxCon this year to speak about what they do to help their students bridge this skill gap and how they work with open source projects to train the next generation of people who will keep the Internet running.

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How open source helped one woman break into the tech industry

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Interviews
OSS

Open source communities have been paving the way for innovation for years, and recently they've been paving the way for diversity in the IT fields, too. For some women, the way into technology was clear and well-lit. Others faced harsh criticism from their families, friends, and society. Thankfully, open source communities are creating a level playing field, enabling women from all over the world to learn, contribute, and make their mark in technology.

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LinuxCon Preview: Q&A with IBM’s Ross Mauri

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Linux
Interviews

As a preview to next week’s LinuxCon, we spoke with Ross Mauri, General Manager, IBM z Systems, about how open infrastructures drive innovation and IBM’s commitment to open ecosystems.

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Founder of Open Source Hardware Association shares her story

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Interviews
OSS

Alicia Gibb has a passion for hardware hacking—she founded and is currently running the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). Also a member of the ADA Initiative Board, Defensive Patent License Board, and the Open Source Ecology Board, she got her start as a technologist from a combination of backgrounds: informatics and library science.

Alicia formerly worked as a researcher and prototyper at Bug Labs where she ran the academic research program and the R&D lab. Her work is fascinating and she graciously agreed to this interview.

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Opening up computers to millions of individuals with disabilities

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Interviews
OSS

The second part is of this question is why these issues are especially important for the open source community. Accessibility gets to the vary core of what open source means. If we really want to make software that is freely available for people to use, share, improve and modify, we have to make sure that that software doesn't exclude some people because it is inaccessible. That defeats the core purpose of open source. As a side benefit, accessible software is software more people can use, and if you can have more people working on your project, your project will be better for it.

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LinuxCon Preview: Q&A with SUSE’s Michael Miller

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Interviews
SUSE

As a preview of next week’s LinuxCon in Seattle, we asked keynote speaker Michael Miller of SUSE to answer some questions about openness in IT infrastructure and what it means for Linux and SUSE.

For more from Michael Miller, check out his keynote presentation at LinuxCon, “Open Source Code: It's in our DNA,” in which he will talk about open source, the progress that has been made, and why now is the perfect time to be building the future of open source together.

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HashPlex Exclusive Interview: Lightning Hub Open Source Release

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Interviews
OSS

HashPlex is a company that specializes in hosting miner services, allowing home miners access to industry standard electricity rates in order to stay competitive. While their main focus is indeed the mining aspect of Bitcoin, the people over at HashPlex understand the importance of the Bitcoin network, which is especially seen by the debut of their new open source lightning hub. I talked to Bernard Rihn, CEO and founder, as well as Jasper Hugunin, their leading Lightning Dev, over at HashPlex regarding the Lightning Network and Hubs.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora 25 Alpha Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8, Wayland & GNOME 3.22

Today, August 30, 2016, the Fedora Project was pleased to announce the immediate availability for download and public testing of the Alpha pre-release build of the upcoming Fedora 25 operating system. The biggest new feature of the Fedora 25 Alpha milestone is the migration to the next-generation Wayland display server in addition to X11 (a.k.a. X.Org Server), which is enabled by default on systems that support it, but it's available only for the Workstation edition that's built around the GNOME desktop environment. Read more Also:

Leftovers: Security

6 Linux Kernel Changes IT Pros Need To Know

The 4.7 Linux kernel includes enhancements to security, automated testing prior to release, and an average 7.8 additions per hour over 10 weeks of development. Here is a look at what IT pros need to know about the OS that powers everything from mobile devices to servers and supercomputers. Read more

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more