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Interviews

‘Open Source Development at Google Is Both Very Diverse and Distributed’

Filed under
Google
Interviews
OSS

Open source development at Google is both very diverse and distributed. The larger projects that we release generally have dedicated teams developing and supporting the project, working with their external developer communities and providing internal support to other Googlers. Many of the smaller projects include just one or two engineers working on something experimental or just a fun, side project. While we do have a central Open Source Programs Office (the group I manage), it is relatively small compared to the size of the company. Instead, the actual development happens throughout the company, with hundreds of teams and thousands of engineers, tech writers, designers and product managers contributing to open source in some way.

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An Interview With Peppermint CEO Mark Greaves

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I personally didn’t start the Peppermint project, that would be Shane Remington and Kendall Weaver who sadly have now left the project because of other commitments. So I’m only going to be able to give you a brief background to their reasoning based on what I’ve gathered from them.

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OSU Open Source Lab leader looks to further FOSS community outreach

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Interviews
OSS

I had a wonderful run at Google -- more than six years -- and decided it was time for a change of scene, both career-wise and geographically. I had worked extensively with the team at OSU's Open Source Lab during my time at Google and had consistently been impressed with their support of the open source community and their leadership in bringing open source into computer science education. My new role allows me to support both aspects of their mission, and I am very excited to join them.

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Tips on Scaling Open Source in the Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

I can summarize that in three points for application developers: a shorter learning curve, better security with less hassle, and more resources with increased agility.

First is the shortened learning curve. Developers just want to develop applications when they use open source. They want to focus on their particular application logic and they want to decide what features to develop. They do not want to spend time and effort on managing the physical infrastructure, an aggravation cloud computing eliminates.

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Young programmer turns love of gaming into a Google Summer of Code project

Filed under
Google
Interviews
Gaming

Recently I installed the GCompris educational software suite on a friend's Linux laptop. While researching information about the application, I found out about Rudra Nil Basu, a young programmer from India, who has blogged about his contributions to GCompris. Based on his work, he was selected to be a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) participant and will receive a stipend to continue working to improve GCompris.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Rudra some questions about how he's translating his passion for game development into making learning fun for young children and supporting open source software and source code sharing. Some questions and answers have been lightly edited for clarity.

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Riley Brandt: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Brandt was initially worried that he would have a more difficult time getting help when he was making the transition from Ubuntu to Fedora. “I was worried that since Fedora has a smaller user base than Ubuntu, I would have trouble getting support. But that wasn’t the case at all. Fedora users were quick to respond to my questions and full of useful info.”

His experience with the Fedora community helped him realize it should not just be the desktop environment or package manager that influences the decision on what distro to use. “Not enough people think about the community. Fedora’s community might be its biggest selling point.”

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Red Hat Interviews

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
  • Red Hat exec talks up new London 'innovation lab'
  • Red Hat exec talks open source strategies, innovation and VMware [iophk: "Free Software?"]

    So, even as things turn into 'products by vendors' or services through cloud, they're generally started with some sort of open source community. The only place where I think there's innovation going on [outside open source] would be some more niche areas, vertical applications where it just doesn't lend itself to broad open source contribution in communities. But I'd say most of the broad-based innovation taking place today starts with open source.

Mark Shuttleworth Reaffirms Commitment to Desktop, Canonical IPO Talk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Ubuntu on the Desktop Will Remain Important to Canonical

    The OpenStack Summit 2017 event kicked off today in Boston, MA, and Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth was there to discuss the upcoming plans for Ubuntu on the desktop, cloud computing, and IoT (Internet of Things).

    The Canonical and Ubuntu founder was interviewed there by theCUBE, who were very curious to know what is the state of Ubuntu Linux these days, now that Mark Shuttleworth shocked the Open Source community when he announced last month that development of the Unity interface is shut down, along with the convergence vision.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Says Ubuntu Desktop “Remains Really Important”

    Mark Shuttleworth has reiterated that the Ubuntu desktop “remains really important” to Canonical.

    He made the comments in an interview with The Cube at the OpenStack Summit 2017 taking place in the USA this week.

    Asked to describe the current state of Ubuntu following last month’s announcement that Canonical is to end investment in Ubuntu Phone, Unity 8, convergence, the Ubuntu founder admitted that Ubuntu ‘failed’ to take Ubuntu mainstream in personal computing.

  • My Current Ubuntu Desktop (And How You Can Recreate It)

    As you may have heard me mention in the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, I’ve been ankle deep in GNOME extensions these past few weeks. Why? Well, like many of you I have made a preëmptive switch to GNOME Shell now that Unity is being left to the cobwebs.

  • Canonical starts IPO path

    At OpenStack Summit, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth revealed in an interview that the recent changes in the Linux and cloud power were to ready Canonical for an IPO.

    In early April, Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu Linux was ending its " investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell." Ubuntu had long been a cloud power, and it's been building its Internet of Things (IoT) reputation. Soon thereafter, Canonical CEO Jane Silber announced she was stepping down and that Shuttleworth would return as CEO.

Node.js Foundation Interview and New Offer

Filed under
Development
Interviews

The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Doky

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Open source continues to encourage and drive innovation globally, and Doky’s offerings are a perfect example of the positive loop created by open source projects leading to new products. Similar to how Linux forever changed the operating system landscape, Doky sees itself as a major catalyst for open source based software that users can access, use and collaborate with their favorite apps easily and in truly seamless and integrated way as never possible before.

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  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks
    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more