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Interviews

FESCo Elections: Interview with Germano Massullo (Caterpillar / germano)

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

I am a Fedora user since 2009.

I co-maintain various packages: BOINC, darktable, LemonPOS and ownCloud client package.

I do tests of Fedora pre-releases in order to have the most stable releases and I am proudly involved in the bug reporting process because I think that the best help you can provide to developers, is helping them finding issues in their software.

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OpenBSD Interview: Renato Westphal (renato@)

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Interviews
BSD

My history with OpenBSD started around 2011 when I was still an undergrad student working part-time on an University-Industry partnership program. In this job I was assigned the task of implementing a full (!) MPLS solution for Linux and that task encompassed having a working implementation of the LDP protocol, among several other things. I started then looking for an open source implementation of LDP and found out that OpenBSD had a daemon called ldpd(8). I decided to check it out and it was love at the first sight when I saw its code: it was beautiful! I started then porting this daemon to Linux and on top of that fixed quite a few bugs. Two years later I decided that it would be fair to contribute my fixes back to the original implementation, it was when claudio@ invited me to join the OpenBSD team. Around that time I didn't know much about OpenBSD and was surprised with the invitation. Theo de Raadt sent me a couple of emails and I had no clue about who he was. Nevertheless, I was excited with the invitation and started to follow the mailing lists and even bought a book about OpenBSD. Within a couple days I was hooked on it and OpenBSD became my OS of choice.

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Also: Hackfest OpenBSD presentations

Keeping the peace: KDE board chair's recipe

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Over the years, one thing that has been always guaranteed about the free software and open source software community is that periodically there will be some unholy row or the other, mostly over issues allegedly to do with sexism and inequality.

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The Linux Setup - Sean Davis, Xubuntu Lead

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

I’m Sean Davis (bluesabre in the FOSS world). I am the current Xubuntu Technical Lead, an Xfce core developer, and I’m a web developer during the day. I’ve been an Ubuntu/Xubuntu user since 2005.

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Vendor Q&A Series: Mark Enzweiler, Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Open source will play a big part in this evolution. It is, after all, the foundation of many of these technologies. Solution providers will need to become intimately familiar with how open source works and the benefits it provides.

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tim bray

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Watching Tim Bray talk to an audience is a little intimidating. He talks fast and every word counts. And he wants action – he wants his audience to change the world. After founding companies, co-authoring the XML specification, working at Sun Microsystems and then Google (leaving because he famously didn’t want to leave Canada for Silicon Valley), Tim has seen, thought and talked about most things to do with technology. He’s even making his own security contributions to the amazing open source Android email application, K-9. His keynote at OSCON 2014 was about threats – threats to our privacy, threats to our online freedoms and threats to our data, and “Now is the time for sensible, reasonable, extreme paranoia,” as he puts it. Which is exactly what we wanted to talk about when we met with him.

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Why systemd is a practical tool for sys admins

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

I met Alison Chaiken at LinuxCon 2010 in Boston, not long after she joined Nokia as a Meego technical consultant. A few months later, I interviewed her about her role at Nokia and her predictions about where open source technology was headed in 2011. She predicted an increasing role for cameras and microphones in mobile. "Cameras and microphones are used deliberately to take photos and record voice commands, but in the future they will be always on, gathering ambient data about the environment of users on the go," she said.

These days Alison works on automotive Linux systems programming at Mentor Graphics' Embedded Software Division, and she spends a lot of time working with, contributing to, and speaking about systemd. She'll be leading a training session, systemd, the Next-Generation Linux System Manager, at LISA15 in Washington D.C. on November 9. In this interview, she makes another prediction—that sys admins will enjoy using systemd.

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Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Stefan Sperling

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

I’m currently self-employed, with a focus on open source development and consulting for companies interacting with open source projects.

Besides OpenBSD, I have been contributing to Apache Subversion since 2007. One of my main jobs is to provide support, workshops, and consulting for Subversion, plus fixing bugs and working on new features. I am somewhat involved in the Apache Software Foundation as a whole, but at this point in time my contributions there are more symbolic in nature, mostly because of lack of time and focus.

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Linux Foundation Scholarship Recipient: Kiran Padwal

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I did my bachelor’s in Electronics Engineering, and embedded systems interested me a lot. Linux runs on millions of embedded devices and is a huge collaborative project -- thanks to Linus Torvalds and the Linux community. I started following Linux in my college days.

When I actually started working on the Linux kernel, I saw some memory leaks in kernel code and observed that every contributor has a voice in the open source community. Therefore, I started sending small patches on LKML. I got great support from maintainers and, because of that, my interest was boosted.

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Red Hat CIO: Business advice on IT value

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

To be truly successful as an IT organization, you must bring new ideas to drive revenue or reduce cost for the business as a whole. If you don’t, they’ll do it without you where there is a critical need and they have a budget. Then, you’ll end up with a non-integrated set of solutions and potentially security exposures.

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Phoronix on NVIDIA

  • Compute Shader Support Patches For NVIDIA Fermi On Nouveau
    Samuel Pitoiset has published a set of twelve patches for implementing compute shaders support within the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for the GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" graphics processors.
  • NVIDIA Posts Latest PRIME Sync Patches On Road To Better Support
    Alex Goins of NVIDIA has spent the past several months working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this NVIDIA-popular multi-GPU method. The latest patches were published this week.
  • The Best Graphics Card Brands For NVIDIA/AMD GPUs As A Linux Consumer?
    One of the most frequent topics I'm emailed about is any brand recommendations among NVIDIA and AMD AIB partners for graphics cards. For Linux users, is there a particular brand preference for graphics cards? The short story is, no, there isn't one particular brand when selecting either a GeForce or Radeon graphics card that a Linux gamer/enthusiast should go with over another AIB partner. Over the past 12 years of running Phoronix, there has been no single AIB partner that superbly stands out compared to the rest when it comes to graphics card AIB partner brands like ASUS, Zotac, HIS, MSI, etc. They all work under Linux, rarely the AIB differences extend beyond the heatsink/cooler and any default clock speed differences, and I haven't seen one that's over-the-top crazy about Linux. I also haven't seen any major partner consistently put the Tux logo or other Linux markings on their product packaging, let alone incorporate any Linux drivers onto their CD/DVD driver media.