Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interviews

Reprogramming Government: A Conversation With Mikey Dickerson

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

We’re encouraging open-source software and access to government data everywhere it is possible to do it.

Read more

Raspberry Pi was created to solve talent crisis at Cambridge: Eben Upton [Interview]

Filed under
Development
Hardware
Interviews

Raspberry Pi needs no introduction. It is one of the most popular credit card sized single board computers which has become a revolution in its own right. The $25 (and $35 for B model) hardware is being used in so many fields that it’s hard to keep a tab on it.

Read more

We still believe in Linus’ law after Heartbleed bug, says Elie Auvray of Jahia

Filed under
Interviews
OSS
Security

Jahia was incepted in 2002 in Switzerland – the name comes from the contraction of Java (our core language) and Bahia (which means “bay” in Brazil). To support the international growth of the project, Jahia Solutions Group was later formed (in 2005) with offices throughout Europe and Jahia Inc. (the US subsidiary) was created in 2008. Jahia has now offices in Geneva, Paris, Toronto, Chicago, Washington, DC, Dusseldorf and Klagenfurt – and outsourced support centers in Australia and Nicaragua.

Read more

DemocracyOS promotes civic engagement on both sides

Filed under
OS
Interviews

Using DemocracyOS represents a challenge for any institution used to make decisions in the traditional way. It is designed for governments to open themselves up to citizen engagement, but power is usually conservative. But the biggest challenge is probably to fight against the presumption that citizens are naturally apathetic and shun commitment. Our challenge is cultural, not technological.

Read more

Scott Sanchez on OpenStack: Shifting a Mindset

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

"I often stand in front of audiences filled with people who use storage servers. I ask them if they still name their servers. Inevitably, two-thirds of the people raise their hands. Their servers have names. ... It is definitely a mindset. ... You are not yet building quality applications. All of the innovation in the world is not going to solve that from an infrastructure perspective."

Read more

PiPhone interview with Dave Hunt

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews
Security

Turning your Raspberry Pi into a mobile phone is a lot simpler than you’d think, albeit a little chunky. Linux User talks to Dave Hunt about one of his many pet projects.

Read more

Upgrading libraries to open source Koha system

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

I am constantly looking for ways to make my life easier whether it's keeping track of my kid's school activity schedule or not loosing my grocery list. For this, I often look for open source solutions. Why? Because most of the time the open source solution is simple and doesn't have unnecessary bells and whistles that I don't need, and even if I need those extra bells and whistles, I know that someone else out there also needs it and most likely has coded it already.

Read more

Open source education for kids with 4 friendly puppets

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

We only use free or open source, Linux-based software for our media production. I distinguish between the two because the best video editor we found on Linux is Lightworks, which is free but not open source (yet). Our theme song was written using LMMS, our 3D animations are rendered in Blender, our graphics are all done in Inkscape and GIMP, and our stopmotion is created using Entangle and then compiled with avconv.

Read more

For The Love Of Open Mapping Data

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

It’s been exactly ten years since the launch of OpenStreetMap, the largest crowd-sourced mapping project on the Internet. The project was founded by Steve Coast when he was still a student.

It took a few years for the idea of OpenStreetMap to catch on, but today, it’s among the most heavily used sources for mapping data and the project is still going strong, with new and improved data added to it every day by volunteers as well as businesses that see the value in an open project like this.

To celebrate the project’s birthday, I sat down with Coast, who now works at Telenav, to talk about OpenStreetMap’s earliest days and its future. Here is a (lightly edited) transcript of the interview.

Read more

Salil Deshpande: Software Engineer. Venture Capitalist. Open Source Investor.

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Midas List VC Salil Deshpande talked to TechRepublic about why he's betting on open source software and what he thinks about the future of IT.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer