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Interviews

Aiming to Be a Zero: The Ultimate Open Source Philosophy

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Interviews
OSS

Guy Martin, Director of the Open@ADSK initiative at Autodesk, had two dreams growing up — to be either an astronaut or a firefighter. Martin has realized his second dream through his work as a volunteer firefighter with Cal Fire, but his love for space is what led to “Aiming to Be an Open Source Zero,” the talk he will be delivering at Open Source Summit NA.

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Open Source Mentoring: Your Path to Immortality

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Rich Bowen is omnipresent at any Open Source conference. He wears many hats. He has been doing Open Source for 20+ years, and has worked on dozens of different projects during that time. He's a board member of the Apache Software Foundation, and is active on the Apache HTTPd project. He works at Red Hat, where he's a community manager on the OpenStack and CentOS projects.

At Open Source Summit North America, Bowen will be delivering a talk titled "Mentoring: Your Path to Immortality." We talked to Bowen to know more about the secret of immortality and successful open source projects.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Unleaded Hangout, Lunduke Hour, and FLOSS Weekly

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Interviews
  • PulseAudio and Systemd | Unleaded Hangout

    Today on Unleaded, Brandon and Joe join me to discuss PulseAudio, systemd and whether or not adoption of these technologies is the end of all things good in the Linux world.

  • Warning, NSFW: "Book Reading: Linux is Badass" - Lunduke Hour - July 19, 2017
  • FLOSS Weekly 442: Hyperledger

    Hyperledger is a project to maintain a platform for distributed ledger projects and the toolkits at apps that support and use them. It’s intended for building private systems where everyone participating can be identified, so does not have an associated proof-of-work token or the “cryptocurrency” aura that goes with it.

    It may be the tool that finally re-decentralises the Internet. By taking away the shiny gold, people can finally see the power of a distributed ledger whose authority is established by consensus rather than heirarchy. The book Simon mentions, “The Myster of Capital” by Hernando de Soto, is available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Audiocasts: Ubuntu Podcast and Ubuntu on The Changelog,

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Red Hat CTO Chris Wright and Demand for Mobile Applications

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Red Hat
Interviews
  • Innovation fuels open source, but focus gets it to the finish line

    When open source works, like Linux, it becomes a powerful platform that drives innovation across multiple areas, from applications to hardware and even security, where the open source community becomes an asset rather than a liability because they help identify vulnerabilities and fixing them as a community, according to Wright. Further, the emergence of mid-stream organisations like OPNFV now brings together different open source projects, making them accessible by users, and creating environments no only for collaborations, but solutions integration and testing, he adds.

  • The convergence of open source, 5G and service providers

    The open source community, 5G standardisation and service providers are converging towards a singular goal. As Red Hat CTO Chris Wright explains, open source networking projects are now developing the core technologies necessarily for 5G, which has articulated the same requirements for an agile infrastructure capable of support multiple application types.

    And while there is still a gap between open source developed technologies and formal standardisation for 5G, the solutions themselves are rapidly becoming mainstream within service provider environments.

  • Enterprise Mobility Survey Commissioned by Red Hat Reveals Growing Demand for Mobile Applications in ASEAN Countries

An Interview With Linux Lite Project Manager Jerry Bezencon

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

​Linux Lite was started for 3 important reasons. One, I wanted to dispel myths that a Linux based operating system was hard to use. Two, there was a shortage of really simple, intuitive desktop experiences on Linux that offered long term support. Three, I had used Linux for over 10 years prior to starting Linux Lite. I felt I needed to give back to a community that had given so much to me. A community that taught me that by sharing code and knowledge, one could have a dramatically positive impact on people's computing experiences.

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‘Open Source Development at Google Is Both Very Diverse and Distributed’

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Google
Interviews
OSS

Open source development at Google is both very diverse and distributed. The larger projects that we release generally have dedicated teams developing and supporting the project, working with their external developer communities and providing internal support to other Googlers. Many of the smaller projects include just one or two engineers working on something experimental or just a fun, side project. While we do have a central Open Source Programs Office (the group I manage), it is relatively small compared to the size of the company. Instead, the actual development happens throughout the company, with hundreds of teams and thousands of engineers, tech writers, designers and product managers contributing to open source in some way.

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An Interview With Peppermint CEO Mark Greaves

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Linux
Interviews

I personally didn’t start the Peppermint project, that would be Shane Remington and Kendall Weaver who sadly have now left the project because of other commitments. So I’m only going to be able to give you a brief background to their reasoning based on what I’ve gathered from them.

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OSU Open Source Lab leader looks to further FOSS community outreach

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I had a wonderful run at Google -- more than six years -- and decided it was time for a change of scene, both career-wise and geographically. I had worked extensively with the team at OSU's Open Source Lab during my time at Google and had consistently been impressed with their support of the open source community and their leadership in bringing open source into computer science education. My new role allows me to support both aspects of their mission, and I am very excited to join them.

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Tips on Scaling Open Source in the Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

I can summarize that in three points for application developers: a shorter learning curve, better security with less hassle, and more resources with increased agility.

First is the shortened learning curve. Developers just want to develop applications when they use open source. They want to focus on their particular application logic and they want to decide what features to develop. They do not want to spend time and effort on managing the physical infrastructure, an aggravation cloud computing eliminates.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.