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Interviews

TechView: Linus Torvalds, Inventor of Linux

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Linux
Interviews

That very much includes me, btw. I think the whole "cult of personality" is pretty disturbing, and I hate how people take me and what I say too seriously. The same goes for Jobs, Ellison, Gates, you name it. I wish more people thought for themselves, and realized that the technology actually flows from all those random anonymous great engineers that are all around.

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Terry Hancock on Free Software and Free Culture [Interview]

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Interviews

Advocates of Free Software aren’t made in a single night. When it comes to computers, software, and digital art, inspiration and motivation are of utmost importance. Terry Hancock, part owner of Anansi Spaceworks and Free Software Magazine columnist, was surrounded by all three growing up.

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Interview With Jennifer Cloer, Director of Communications at The Linux Foundation

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Linux
Interviews

Jennifer Cloer

TUX MACHINES has caught up with Jennifer Cloer, who is the director of communications at The Linux Foundation. Our short interview focuses on Linux in devices and some of the existing challenges.


Tux Machines: As the growth of Linux accelerates, especially on devices, patent pressure intensifies. Short of patent reform, which is seemingly too slow to arrive, how can one counter threats to the zero-cost advantage of Linux?

Jennifer Cloer: Certainly, we have to be mindful of patent issues, as does anyone working in the software industry, whether they work on open source or proprietary software. It is an issue. But given the massive community that supports and depends on Linux, there are hundreds of companies and thousands of developers invested in Linux and prepared to defend the operating system every day.

TM: Android is becoming the de facto standard platform in several areas, but it is also the carrier of many proprietary apps. How do the mobile Linux platforms backed by the Linux Foundation distinguish themselves from this?

JC: The Linux Foundation supports and “backs” all Linux-based platforms. The more people building with Linux and contributing back to the kernel, the better for everyone. Platforms will distinguish themselves in a number of ways but that will be determined by the communities, developers and companies supporting those platforms.

TM: Short of lobbying, how can one help politicians or CIOs grasp the advantages of software that they have full control over?

JC: Governments and CIOs understand the advantages now more than ever. Governments around the world are embracing open source and have been for years now. CIOs are increasingly using Linux and open source as the building blocks for their enterprises, especially as the cloud has become so prominent. In our latest Enterprise End User Report, 80 percent of users said they would increase their use of Linux over the next five years; just 20 percent said they would increase their use of Windows during the same time period.

TM: The Linux Foundation recently organised events in Europe, including the UK. Are there plans of expanding such initiatives?

JC: The Linux Foundation hosts LinuxCon and CloudOpen in Europe every year. This year we’ll be in Dusseldorf October 13-15, 2014. We will continue to host other events in Europe, too, such as Embedded Linux Conference and KVM Forum. We’ll also host ApacheCon and CloudStack Conference in Europe in Budapest on November 17-21, 2014.

Richard Stallman Answers Your Questions

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GNU
Interviews

A few of the questions asked about "open source software" in such a way that, responding to them directly, I'd be classifying programs as "open" or "closed". That I will not do, because those terms presuppose a different philosophy based on different values.

Rather than give no answer to those questions, I modified them to say "free software" instead, and answered them that way. (Square brackets show these changes.) I hope the answers to these modified questions are of interest to readers. They are rather different from what an open source supporter would say.

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Ikey Doherty Talks Evolve OS & Budgie Desktop

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Interviews

Ikey Doherty is probably one of the most tech-smart people I know. Fact is, Ikey is much like that guy you hear about on the news, the guy that can hear a string of 4 digit numbers and tell you the sum of them in a couple of seconds. Now, I don’t know if Ikey is capable of that feat, but I do know what he can do.

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We still believe in Linus’ law after Heartbleed bug, says Elie Auvray of Jahia

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Interviews
OSS

Today Jahia is the #1 Open Source alternative to proprietary CMS vendors for upper tier digital projects. Over the years, we’ve focused on building a content platform that delivers true technology convergence: business user and developers work in harmony to deploy digital projects (Portals, multichannel, multi site, Multilanguage corporate sites, extranets, intranets and even full digital applications) securely and seamlessly.

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MakuluLinux Interview: Lead Developer Jaque Raymer Talks About Makulu

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Interviews
Debian

After looking at the latest edition of MakuluLinux, which comes with MATE 1.8 and looks awesome, we decided to ask Jaque Raymer, the lead developer of Makulu, a few questions regarding this new, customizable distribution which employs a new direction, making it stand out compared to other distributions.

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Inside SparkyLinux - An interview with Pawel "Pavroo" Pijanowski

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

I think it started when I installed the same Linux distribution with the same set of applications, configuration and layout as mine, to my wife's and then to my colleague's computers. Then somebody asked me why should I not try to share my point of view with more people.

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I'm Cory Doctorow, and This Is How I Work

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Ubuntu and the suite of GNU tools in any robust Unix system. A good text editor (currently Gedit)—I keep all of my working files at .txts. A robust, highly configurable browser (Firefox/Firefox for Android). A fast RSS reader (presently Google Reader, likely to be Newsblur next). A tetherable mobile connection—I use EasyTether for Android to circumvent tether-blocking as deployed by some of the carriers I use around the world, especially Rogers in Canada. AirDroid for moving files on/off Android devices in my life.

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Inside Peppermint Linux - An interview with Shane Remington and Kendall Weaver

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Interviews

This time however I have been lucky enough to get not just one member of the team but two. I recently sent an email to the Peppermint Linux team with a series of questions and what follows are the answers provided by Shane Remington (COO of Peppermint) and Kendall Weaver (CTO of Peppermint).

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Tiny Box PCs and DeX

  • Linux Tiny Box PCs: Quad-core i.MX6 Dual Lite
    Kingdy's new ultra-compact tiny embedded platform for space limited solution, based on the ARM Cortex-A9TM iMX6 Dual Lite / Quad Core processor, delivers optimum I/O design for maximum connectivity with Pre-install Yocto 1.8 on eMMC.
  • Samsung to Give Linux Desktop Experience to Smartphone Users
    Samsung on Thursday announced a new app, Linux on Galaxy, designed to work with its DeX docking station to bring a full Linux desktop experience to Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphone users. Samsung earlier this year introduced DeX, a docking station that connects to a monitor to give Galaxy smartphone users a desktop experience.

Fedora: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Council

  • Looking back at Fedora Workstation so far
    So I have over the last few years blogged regularly about upcoming features in Fedora Workstation. Well I thought as we putting the finishing touches on Fedora Workstation 27 I should try to look back at everything we have achieved since Fedora Workstation was launched with Fedora 21. The efforts I highlight here are efforts where we have done significant or most development. There are of course a lot of other big changes that has happened over the last few years by the wider community that we leveraged and offer in Fedora Workstation, examples here include things like Meson and Rust. This post is not about those, but that said I do want to write a post just talking about the achievements of the wider community at some point, because they are very important and crucial too. And along the same line this post will not be speaking about the large number of improvements and bugfixes that we contributed to a long list of projects, like to GNOME itself. This blog is about taking stock and taking some pride in what we achieved so far and major hurdles we past on our way to improving the Linux desktop experience.
  • Resigning from Fedora Council for Fedora 27
    Since I became a Fedora contributor in August 2015, I’ve spent a lot of time in the community. One of the great things about a big community like Fedora is that there are several different things to try out. I’ve always tried to do the most help in Fedora with my contributions. I prefer to make long-term, in-depth contributions than short-term, “quick fix”-style work. However, like many others, Fedora is a project I contribute to in my free time. Over the last month, I’ve come to a difficult realization.

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!
    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it. Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different. Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.
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  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin
    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first. The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.
  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release
    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu. For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.
  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger
    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.