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Interviews

Techright’s Roy Schestowitz on All Things Free Tech

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Interviews

Do you love Microsoft? Dr. Roy Schestowitz doesn’t. He also led a “Boycott Novell” movement back when there was a Novell to boycott, and he has crusaded against other tech companies, especially regarding software patents. It is, as they say, “Clean indoor work, but somebody has to do it.” And Roy is that somebody.

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A conversation with Salvatore Sanfilippo, creator of the open-source database Redis

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Interviews
OSS

In case you haven’t heard, Redis is one of the most widely used databases in the world. It’s one of the most popular software projects on GitHub, right up there with tools from Facebook and Google.

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Arthur Buliva: How do you Fedora?

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Interviews

Arthur is from Kenya and first used Linux in 2002 when he was a freshman in college. During that time, open source software was just starting to be used in Kenya. He used Red Hat Linux 8 at the time, which he eventually upgraded to Red Hat Linux 9.

When asked about his childhood heroes, Arthur replied, “I grew up watching Indiana Jones on a VCR. Boy, did I wish I had a whip just like Indie’s!” He is an avid mountain biker and dog trainer. During the day, Arthur works as a software engineer at the United Nations office in Nairobi. At night, he interacts with open source software communities and chases after dogs he trains.

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How a student in India got started with open source

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Interviews
OSS

I have always been an open source enthusiast. And when I heard about the awesome community from my brother I just couldn't wait to join in. He has always motivated me to do great things. I'm always enthusiastic to learn new things. Contributing to open source organizations, meeting amazing people and communities, and, of course, a deep interest of writing code have motivated me to join the summer training. I believe that I am able to achieve all these things after I joined the summer training and the great community DGP LUG.

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Bringing Mozilla to the IoT era

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Interviews
Moz/FF

Rabimba has been involved in open source since the summer of 2014, when he was connected to Mozilla for the first time through the company's investments into Firefox OS in India. In this interview, I ask him how he got involved in open source, what he's currently working on, and how get got involved in contributing to Mozilla.

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Q&A: Jonathan Riddell on the release of KDE neon User Edition 5.6

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KDE
Interviews

I’m thrilled to be part of the first project to bring KDE’s flagship desktop software to our users direct from the KDE community. We had to fill in a few gaps in what Plasma offers its users to complete the experience but we did that by working in Plasma rather than doing our work separately. So we added bootup themes for Grub and Plymouth and we’ve worked to make sure the app store, Discover, covers the whole archive. But the most important feature is what Neon is intended to be, a Plasma 5.6 desktop as the developers intended it.

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High-Availability Allows Business Continuity, Says Dietmar Maurer, Proxmox CTO

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH -- based in Vienna, Austria -- offers enterprise server virtualization solutions, including the open source project Proxmox Virtual Environment (VE), which combines container-based virtualization and KVM/QEMU on one web-based management interface. The company was founded in 2005 by brothers Martin and Dietmar Maurer. In 2014, the company joined the Linux Foundation to deepen its commitment to virtualization technologies such as KVM.

In this exclusive interview, Dietmar Maurer, CTO of Proxmox, talks about how virtualization is driving the modern IT infrastructure and how high availability (HA) directly affects business operations.

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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Gustavo Gómez Morales

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Linux
Interviews

I started using Linux in 1996. The idea of an open source operating system, where it's possible to access and customize a lot of things, amazed me.

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SDN

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Interviews
OSS
  • SDN is Coming. Is Your Workforce Ready?

    SDN will not emerge in a vacuum, however, and with the entire data center turning into a software construct, today’s network manager will find that tomorrow’s enterprise will require skills in storage, server and virtual infrastructure as well. And all the while, new technologies like containers will be coming online that must be integrated into an increasingly dynamic data environment. As linux.com’s Amber Ankerholz points out, Docker utilizes SDN and VXLAN technologies reasonably well, but numerous development projects like Calico and Weaveworks are underway to enable crucial management, integration and orchestration functions. All of this will simply add to the burden of learning the ins and outs of maintaining connectivity across abstract and increasingly distributed infrastructure.

  • AT&T: Domain 2.0 has upset vendors' business models, says Prabhu

    AT&T's (NYSE: T) creation of the Domain 2.0 program, which is driven by the implementation of software-defined networks (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV), is causing the telecom equipment industry to rethink how they deliver products and services.

  • SDN Factors Into Packet Optical Convergence

    Earlier this year, Facebook led the charge to launch a new open source group – the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) – whose mission is to improve global Internet connections. TIP will employ the same methods Facebook has used to re-design data centers via its Open Compute Project (OCP). Some of TIP’s goals are lofty: such as rethinking network architectures and bringing the Internet to underserved regions of the globe.

  • Support Builds for P4 to Boost NFV

    In a world where network processors are viewed as a commodity, the assumption is that most innovation will be driven by software. But support is building for the P4 language to boost NFV, as chip specialists point to hardware improvements that will be key for more demanding applications in a virtualized environment.

    “Too many people think innovation is all about software,” says Cliff Grossner, an industry analyst with Infonetics. “The pendulum is now swinging back to hardware.”

Audio/Shows

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Interviews
  • The History of Open Source & Free Software, Pt. 1, w/ Special Guest: Richard Stallman

    In the early 1980’s Richard Stallman founded the Free Software Foundation (FSF): a socio-technological movement that revolutionized the software world. In this episode we’ll hear Stallman himself talking about the roots of the movement, and learn of its early struggles.

  • Our First Podcast, with ProfessorKaos64

    We are introducing today a new way to enjoy BoilingSteam with our first podcast. It was recorded on the 22nd of May, along with our special guest, ProfessorKaos64, who is pretty well known in the linux gaming community for his work on expanding SteamOS beyond its initial scope of only launching Steam games. You can check his SteamOS-tools page on Git-hub to find out the extent of his work so far.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

Linux and Graphics

  • OpenRISC For Linux 4.11 Gets Some Optimizations, Prepares For SMP
    OpenRISC continues advancing with its sights on being a free and open processor for embedded systems using the RISC instruction set architecture. Last year the Linux kernel got a new OpenRISC maintainer and for Linux 4.11 there is a fair amount of interesting changes for the OpenRISC code within the mainline tree.
  • drm for v4.11 - main pull request
    The tinydrm code seems like absolute pure shit that has never seen a compiler. I'm upset, because I expect better quality control. In fact, I expect *some* qualitty control, and this piece-of-shit driver has clearly seen none at all. And those patches were apparently committed yesterday. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?
  • [Old] A Guide Through The Linux Sound API Jungle
    At the Audio MC at the Linux Plumbers Conference one thing became very clear: it is very difficult for programmers to figure out which audio API to use for which purpose and which API not to use when doing audio programming on Linux.
  • Mesa, Vulkan & Other Driver Talks From 2017 Embedded Linux Conference
  • Fuzzing Mesa Drivers Begin To Uncover Bugs
    Last December we wrote about work being done on fuzzing OpenGL shaders leading to wild differences with the work being done at the Imperial College London. While they were testing other drivers on different operating systems, they have now fired up tests of Mesa.
  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Compositor Released
    Wayland 1.13 was released earlier this week but the adjoining Weston compositor update didn't happen at the same time due to some last minute changes needing more time to test, but this Friday, Weston 2.0 is now shipping. But before getting too excited, Weston 2.0 doesn't represent some break-through changes but rather was bumped away from the Wayland versioning rhythm due to its new output configuration API breaking Weston's ABI. Thus the major version bump.
  • weston 2.0.0
    Welcome to the official release of Weston 2.0. There are no changes since RC2.

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