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Interviews

Using strace to track system calls in Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Strace is a tool used to intercept system calls from your application to the Linux kernel. I find strace is invaluable for system administrators for two main reasons.

First off, we do not always have the source code of an application available, but we may still need to know what an application is doing. This can be anything from which files are opened, how much memory is being allocated or even why an application is crashing repeatedly.
Secondly, even if we do have the code, being a system administrator doesn't imply being a developer. We may not know how to follow the code. I find that looking at system calls as opposed to lines of code is a bit more descriptive

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ScyllaDB: Cassandra compatibility at 1.8 million requests per node

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

I have been involved with Linux and open source since the mid-1990s, and Scylla is a natural progression for open source to move up the stack and provide more value for some of the most demanding companies out there. The problems involved in running a resilient database are some of the hardest and most valuable in IT today.

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3 smart GIMP tricks

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Honestly, I think a lot of the people claiming GIMP isn't as good as Photoshop are people who have invested a lot in learning Photoshop and want an excuse not to learn a new and different tool. If the GIMP team spent much time trying to make everything just like Photoshop, they'd never have time to implement great new features.

It's true there are some nice features Photoshop has that GIMP doesn't. Some are being addressed for GIMP 3.0, like high-color images. A lot of people will be very happy to see that. Other features, like non-destructive editing and CMYK, are still wish-list items that will have to wait until later.

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Linux Foundation Scholarship Recipient: Vaishali Thakkar

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The Linux Foundation’s Training Scholarship Program has awarded 34 scholarships totaling more than $100,000 in free training to students and professionals during the past five years. In this series, we are featuring recent scholarship recipients with the hope of inspiring others.

Vaishali Thakkar is a scholarship recipient in the Kernel Guru category. She lives in India and recently completed an Outreachy internship on project Coccinelle. The goal of her project was replacing out-of-date API uses and deprecated functions and macros in the Linux kernel with more modern equivalents. She began contributing to the Linux kernel almost a year ago, and her first contribution was running a Coccinelle semantic patch over staging directory files. She says the excitement of having that first patch accepted was amazing, and she hopes some day to have her dream job of “Linux Kernel Engineer.”

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More kernel/Linux: Linux Update Improves Processor Support

Participate in the 2016 ODL User Survey

Brian Proffitt: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Brian has been involved with Linux for a long time. In the summer of 1999, he was asked to write a book about Sun StarOffice 5.1 for Linux. This was a challenge for Brian as he had never run Linux before. “I got a hold of a Caldera OpenLinux CD set and installed it on a friend’s spare PC.” He was hooked on Linux when he was able to play an in-memory game of Tetris while the operating system was being installed.

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Open source communities need mentors

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Interviews
OSS

To me it seems a natural pairing because they are two things I am passionate about and things that I do and use every single day. So many of the principles of open source correlate with the positive outcomes most desired for children: collaboration, participation, and transparency (honesty, integrity, openness). For children who are interested in how things work, open source software can give them that behind-the-scenes peek. I love teaching children about open source because there are so many ways they can get their hands dirty and get involved in communities and meet people who share their particular interests. There are many projects that were developed with children in mind, like the great work done by Sugar Labs.

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Exclusive Interview with Console OS CEO Regarding Ongoing Feud with Android-x86

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Last week we published an article regarding the ongoing feud between the Android-x86 and Console OS projects, and it looks like there is an intense debate in the community. Since we already know what the Android-x86 leader thinks, we also had a talk with the CEO of Console OS Inc. to get his side of the story.

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Interview: Jono Bacon

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Interviews
OSS

He’s the Pharaoh of community management, but what led him to switch from Ubuntu to the millionaire philanthropic prize fund, XPRIZE?

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Guillaume Roguez, Ring Project Director

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Ring is multi-media communication platform with secured multi-media channels, that doesn't require centralized servers to work. It is developed by Savoir-faire Linux, a Canadian company located in Montréal, Québec. It is a potential free-software replacement for Skype, and possibly more.

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Sylvia Sanchez: How do you Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Sylvia Sanchez is a Fedora user and contributor living in Uruguay. She started using Linux ten years ago when she bought her first computer. Sanchez recalls, “My first computer came with Guadalinex, an Ubuntu-based distribution, promoted by the government of Andalusia, Spain.” In an odd twist, Sylvia was converted to Fedora at an Ubuntu release party. She has been a Fedora user since Fedora 16. Her childhood heroes are Wonder Woman and Spiderman. Milanesas with salad and fried potatoes is her favorite food. She is an aviation enthusiast who loves airplanes and studying history. She recently started a personal blog called Crossing the Air.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers