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Interviews

The Linux Setup - Sean Cross, Novena Developer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Interviews

I’m not a big hardware guy. At all. Specs mean very little to me. However, Sean’s hardware is interesting, as it’s a Novena, something he developed himself. And of course, because he’s working with Linux, he’s able to get things to run pretty well. I have no idea what the future of the Novena is, but I love that people can make new devices that will be able to access familiar software and interfaces. Microsoft is making Windows cost-free for certain devices. It’s a smarter strategy than charging manufacturers, but until they let people get under the hood of the code, they’re going to have a hard time reaching new, experimental devices. Which is actually OK with me, since I’m happy to have Linux in as many places as possible.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Rackspace

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Interviews

Rackspace has lately been in the news for its stock market gains and a potential acquisition. But over the past 16 years the company has become well known, first as a web hosting provider built on Linux and open source, and later as a pioneer of the open source cloud and founder of the OpenStack cloud platform.

In May, Rackspace became a Xen Project member and was one of three companies to join the Linux Foundation as a corporate member, along with CoreOS and Cumulus Networks.

“Many of the applications and infrastructure that we need to run for internal use or for customers run best on Linux,” said Paul Voccio, Senior Director of Software Development at Rackspace, via email. “This includes all the popular language frameworks and open virtualization platforms such as Xen, LXC, KVM, Docker, etc.”

In this Q&A, Voccio discusses the role of Rackspace in the cloud, how the company uses Linux, why they joined the Linux Foundation, as well as current trends and future technologies in the data center.

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OPENDAYLIGHT DEVELOPER SPOTLIGHT: LUIS GOMEZ

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Luis Gomez is Principal Software Test Engineer at Brocade and currently coordinates the Integration Group at OpenDaylight. Prior to this, Luis worked many years at Ericsson in end-to-end solution integration and verification for radio, fixed, core and transport functions...

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A Conversation With Linus Torvalds, Who Built The World's Most Robust Operating System And Gave It Away For Free

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

In 1991, 22-year old Finnish computer programmer Linus Torvalds released his own operating system. Opening with the message “Hello everybody out there,” (a now-iconic phrase among Linux fans), he posted the source code online. People alternately contributed their abilities to improve it where they could or went off to build their own things with it.

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RASPBERRY PI IN SCHOOLS

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Interviews

Two years ago, when the Raspberry Pi launched, it was with the intention of improving IT education in the UK. Since then more powerful, better connected or cheaper boards have come onto the market, but the Pi retains its position as the white knight of ICT teaching.
Why? Because of the community of users that has grown up around it. To find out more we travelled west to Manchester, venue for the second annual Jamboree – a festival of educators, makers and messer-abouters focussed on highlighting how engaging the Pi can be. There, we met 75% of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s education team – Ben Nuttall, Clive Beale and Carrie Anne Philbin – to discuss IT teaching in the UK.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Cumulus Networks

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux has already transformed data center economics on the server side, and Cumulus Networks is set to do it again – this time through the network. The company behind Cumulus Linux, the first distribution for data center switches and other networking hardware, is part of a broader enterprise movement toward open networking.

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Aber SailBot interview

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

The autonomous Raspberry Pi-powered robot yacht built by British students that competes worldwide

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Linus Torvalds reads mean tweets

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linus Torvalds has a great sense of humor (depending on your taste of humor), as long as you are not at the receiving end. But there is nothing funnier than him reading some tweets targeting him. The Linux Foundation has published a video where Linus is reading some tweets on the lines of Jimmy Kimmel’s Mean Tweets series.

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The Companies That Support Linux: CoreOS

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

As companies grow their data centers to accommodate more cloud services and applications, their resource management practices also grow increasingly complex. CoreOS is a new Linux distribution that uses containers to help manage these massive server deployments.

On May 19, CoreOS joined the Linux Foundation as a corporate member, along with Rackspace Hosting and Cumulus Networks. All three companies are playing a crucial role in the data center transformation and see open source as the lynchpin for optimal scalability, efficiencies, security and data center savings.

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TechView: Linus Torvalds, Inventor of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

That very much includes me, btw. I think the whole "cult of personality" is pretty disturbing, and I hate how people take me and what I say too seriously. The same goes for Jobs, Ellison, Gates, you name it. I wish more people thought for themselves, and realized that the technology actually flows from all those random anonymous great engineers that are all around.

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Linux Foundation's certification sets new benchmark for admins

At LinuxCon last week, the Linux Foundation announced a new certification scheme for Linux professionals to complement their existing training activities. The Linux Foundation Certification Program offers a peer-verified certification for both early-career and engineer-level systems administrators for a fee of $300. The process involves a real-time skill test administered via a remote-access virtual machine running one of several Linux distributions. To ensure the rules are followed, a human proctor watches the test via screen-sharing and video camera using your own computer at a location of your choice. The certification tests real-world skills for both sys admins and more senior engineers at the command line and in configuration files. Read more

Linux Mint Debian to Be Called "Betsy"

"The upcoming release of LMDE will be version 2, codename 'betsy' and it will use a Debian 'jessie' package base. The team is currently adapting to the new LMDE, setting up its repositories and porting various packages onto it. The target for a stable release is estimated for this November, along with an official upgrade path from UP8 to Betsy," said the leader of the Linux Mint project, Clement Lefebvre. Read more

Adapting to the Mobile World

Now more than ever companies are gaining a mobile presence due to the popularity of smartphones and tablets. It is important to any company’s success to become part of the mobile world if they want to build business. Consumers used to look up companies in the phonebook, but now the first action consumers take when they need to find a company is to look them up online. If consumers cannot find a company online, they are likely to find a different company instead of continuing the search through other means. Because the Internet is so easily accessed from mobile devices now, consumers use their devices to find their favorite companies so a strong mobile presence is a must if companies do not want to lose business. Hasbro goes mobile According to Mobile Marketer, Hasbro has decided to create a mobile presence in order to keep up with video games. So far Hasbro’s Monopoly application has been a great success because it promotes family and friend engagement and users can personalize the app by uploading pictures of themselves to use as game pieces. Consumers like personalization, and so if companies want to see success from their mobile marketing strategies they should consider personalizing them to consumers in some way. Companies hesitate to go mobile because they are set in their ways, and they might already be seeing success, however as technology advances all companies should consider building a mobile presence if they want to continue to be successful. Successful mobile marketing techniques Thanks to mobile devices there are a number of ways companies can reach out to consumers who use them. SMS advertisements are a great way to personalize advertising for consumers making them feel important and ultimately driving in business. Marketing applications are another way companies can engage with consumers on a more personal basis. Consumers like to be in control, and applications are a great way they can control the type of marketing they receive. If apps are intriguing enough, consumers are likely to promote them to friends and family, which will ultimately promote business. Convenience of being mobile Consumers like the convenience of being able to locate and engage with their favorite companies from their mobile devices, so it is important that companies maintain that presence. Consumers are looking for ways to make their lives easier, and being able to purchase products with the click of a button or pay bills on the fly will only increase business for companies because consumers are always looking for convenience. Being mobile can benefit companies in several ways, but one way that is especially appealing to companies is the ease of keeping track of business thanks to their mobile presence. Mobile devices and websites help companies to keep track of important data such as which marketing strategies are working the best and where most of the sales are coming from. Being mobile can enhance business in several ways and should be a priority for all companies. Mobile Technology News brought to you by businesstexter.com Source: mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/gaming/18437.html

Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

Why choose open source? “In some ways, [the open source software used by the agency] is effectively more capable” than commercial products, he said. “In terms of cost-effectiveness, [it] wins hands down: no license/maintenance fees, extensible architecture [and] global open source R&D.” The team uses an open source software package called ‘R’. Read more