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Interviews

The intersection of Drupal, IoT, and open hardware

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Interviews
Drupal

Back in the day, I was working at a large nonprofit in the "webmaster's office" of the marketing department and was churning out custom PHP/MySQL forms like nobody's business. I finally got weary of that and starting hunting around the web for a better way. I found Drupal 6 and starting diving in on my own. Years later, after a career shift and a move, I discovered the Portland Drupal User Group and landed a job as a full-time Drupal developer. I continued to regularly attend the meetups in Portland, which I found to be a great source of community, friendships, and professional development. Eventually, I landed a job with Lullabot as a trainer creating content for Drupalize.Me. Now, I'm managing the Drupalize.Me content pipeline, creating Drupal 8 content, and am very much involved in the Portland Drupal community. I'm this year's coordinator, finding and scheduling speakers.

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Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Gabriele is a Fedora Ambassador who works both locally and internationally. He is most impressed by the jovial and warm atmosphere within the project. Everyone can share suggestions, opinions and information in a friendly, collaborative environment. Trombini stresses that respect and the willingness to change are necessary to keep the Fedora Community strong. “Let’s try something, and if it doesn’t return the expected results, we should be ready to change our way,” says Trombini.

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GNU founder Stallman: ‘Open source is not free software’

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GNU
Interviews

Stallman is frequently described as an advocate of open source computing, even its father. It’s a characterization he vehemently denies. “I want people to associate me with free software, not open source,” he said. “I don’t want to make statements about open source except how it differs from free software.”

Or, as a statement on GNU.org sums it up: “The free software movement campaigns for your freedom in your computing, as a matter of justice. The open source non-movement does not campaign for anything.”

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Meet the man behind Ubuntu MATE

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Interviews
Ubuntu

“Ubuntu MATE is a stable, easy-to-use operating system with a configurable desktop environment. It is ideal for those who want the most out of their computers and prefer a traditional desktop metaphor. With modest hardware requirements, it is suitable for modern workstations, single board computers (such as as the Raspberry Pi) and older hardware alike. Ubuntu MATE makes modern computers fast and older computers usable.”

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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Adedayo Samuel

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Linux
Interviews

From my experience interviewing for jobs and to advance my career, it has been a personal desire of mine to understand the inner workings of a computer, and Linux provided a platform for doing that by having a design philosophy that doesn’t shy away from the command line so that caused me to dive right in!

I like open source because of the free software movement (we can always do with more free software), and more importantly because such a movement is capable of inspiring an operating system like Linux which powers servers of Fortune 500 companies and services we depend on like Banks, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and my favorite mobile OS – Android.

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What sets Krita apart from other open source digital painting tools

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Interviews

Definitely! Exposure to Linux and the open source communities opens a whole new world of opportunities to students that is independent of social status or financial ability. A lot of programs have student versions that you can use for practicing, or schools will get a group rate on licenses for programs, but any artwork made on either of those versions doesn't belong to you and can't be used for any sort of financial gain. Teaching with Krita or similar programs would empower the students to create artwork, game assets, or whatever that they truly own the rights to.

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Mark Shuttleworth: ‘Ubuntu keeps GNU/Linux relevant

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GNU
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu

In my ongoing quest to interview the leadership of every Linux distribution on the planet (see my interviews with the heads of elementary, Fedora and openSUSE) I reached out to the top dog in the Ubuntu world: Mark Shuttleworth.

This is not a hard-hitting, no-holds-barred sort of interview. It’s just a casual chat to hear about Ubuntu from the guy that started it and hopefully, in the process, get to know him a little better.

What follows are his unedited answers. I have some opinions (both good and bad) about Mark's answers—and I expect most of you will, too. But I'm going to keep them to myself here. I'll let his answers speak for themselves without much commentary from me.

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How Red Hat became the world's first billion dollar open source company - An interview with CEO Jim Whitehurst

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Red Hat
Interviews

In my first month at Red Hat, we made several significant decisions, some I was not involved in. I recognized then that an organization allowed to see things in the market and respond quickly, without an order coming down the chain of command, has the ability to be extremely competitive. What's more, because people feel empowered to act, they're more engaged.

We don't experience change management problems the way other organizations do. While being open means including more people and weighing their feedback, all of which can take time, once we've made a decision at Red Hat, things happen quickly. I would say we spend more time in the decision-making process so that once decisions are made, execution is fast.

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5 open source programs for the automated teen's toolbox

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Interviews
OSS

My first open source project was GIMP. In second grade, I made a cover for a small book I wrote. My dad taught me how to deal with layers so that I ended up looking like I was hugging a fictional character (Fancy Nancy!). As far as the first open source project for other kids, I would suggest OpenShot [video editor]. It was my brother's first open source program, too. It's so simple to use, but complex enough so that kids can get a head start into a more advanced field—video editing.

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Podcast: A chat with Android chief Hiroshi Lockheimer

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Android
Interviews

Hiroshi Lockheimer loves seeing his work in the hands of strangers.

That simple fact is what he credits with his decision to take a job at Google a decade ago -- and maybe, just maybe, give himself the chance to have his software show up on phones around the world.

It was a dream that seemed both distant and wild at the time.

"We were a tiny, tiny part of Google," Lockheimer remembers, thinking back to his early days with the company -- when Android was still a closely guarded top-secret project. "We were kind of an outpost of an outpost of an outpost type of thing."

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Open Source Software: 10 Go To Solution for Small Businesses

While closed-source operating systems such as Windows and Mac OS may still dominate the OS market, not everyone can afford the high costs that they entail. For small- and medium-sized enterprises where every penny matters, taking advantage of open-source software such as Ubuntu’s Linux is a good bet to boost productivity and cost effectiveness. The fact that open-source softwares have evolved to become somewhat user-friendly and sleek also helps a good deal. Read more

Linux 4.11-rc8

So originally I was just planning on releasing the final 4.11 today, but while we didn't have a *lot* of changes the last week, we had a couple of really annoying ones, so I'm doing another rc release instead. I did get fixes for the issues that popped up, so I could have released 4.11 as-is, but it just doesn't feel right. It's not like another week of letting this release mature will really hurt. The most noticeable of the issues is that we've quirked off some NVMe power management that apparently causes problems on some machines. It's not entirely clear what caused the issue (it wasn't just limited to some NVMe hardware, but also particular platforms), but let's test it. Read more Also: Linux 4.11 delayed for a week by NVMe glitches and 'oops fixes' Linux 4.11 Pushed Back: 4.11-rc8 Released

Themes for Ubuntu

  • Flattiance is a Flat Fork of Ubuntu’s Ambiance Theme
    Flattiance is pitched as a “semi-flat fork” of the Ubuntu Ambiance theme. You know, the one that ships out of the box and by default. On the whole Flattiance keeps to the same color palette, with dark browns and orange accents, but it ditches the gradient in app headers in favour of a solid block.
  • A quick look at some essential GNOME Shell tweaks and extensions
    Now that Ubuntu is moving to GNOME Shell, many people will get a bit of a shock at how different the workflow is from Unity to Shell. Here’s a quick look at some essentials to get you going.