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Interviews

How one girl is making good on her dream to become a Linux kernel engineer

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Gender gap is one of the hottest topics in the tech industry. To address this, many organizations in the open source world, including the Gnome Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, and The Linux Foundation, organize programs to encourage female participation.

The Linux Foundation's Linux Training Scholarship Program offers free training to individuals. Vaishali Thakkar was one of the recipients this year under the Kernel Guru category. She lives in India and recently completed an Outreachy internship on project Coccinelle.

I reached out to Vaishali to learn more about her experience with the Linux community, the atmosphere in India for Linux developers and much more.

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Challenging, Rewarding, and Fulfilling: A Q&A with Shuah Khan on Linux Kernel Development

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Shuah Khan was the very first engineer to join Samsung’s North American Open Source Group shortly after it was founded in 2013. Since then, she has been extremely valuable to the company through her contributions to the Linux Kernel. She was recently elected to the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board, presenting her with a wonderful opportunity to help direct the Linux Kernel community from the highest technical level.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Michael Lissner and Brian Carver of RECAP The Law

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

This is the latest instalment of our Licensing and Compliance Lab's series on free software developers who choose GNU licenses for their works. In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Michael Lissner and Brian Carver of RECAP The Law.

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Implementing an Open Source Private Docker-based PaaS: A Q&A with Rancher Labs CEO Sheng Liang

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Rancher Labs have created RancherOS, a minimalist operating system (OS) built to explicitly run Docker, and also Rancher, an open source platform for building a private container service, much like Engine Yard’s Deis PaaS and VMware’s Photon platform. InfoQ sat down with Rancher Labs CEO, Sheng Liang, and asked about the Rancher platform, common container platform issues such as networking and storage, and how a container platform will fit into a standard development workflow.

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Jamie Duncan: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Jamie started using Fedora around 2007 and became a Fedora Ambassador in 2012. Duncan contributes to and maintains a few projects in Fedora. The project that gets the most attention is SOSCleaner. SOSCleaner is a tool that takes sosreports or datasets and intelligently obfuscates potentially sensitive data.

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Teaching teens 3D animation with Blender

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Interviews
OSS

We also need to prepare 2D assets (textures), for which GIMP and Inkscape are both used. I would like to get MyPaint and Krita (which I prefer to GIMP) installed as well, but the computers we use are running Scientific Linux, which is a rather conservative distro, and installing them has proved unjustifiably time consuming for the support staff. Would also like G'Mic (a plugin for GIMP and Krita) as it contains some useful tools for preparing textures.

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IO Visor: Bringing the Network to the Linux Kernel

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Interviews

The IO Visor project is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project chartered to create an open source, technical community where industry participants easily contribute to and adopt the IO Visor project's technology for an open programmable data plane for modern IO and networking applications.

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FAmSCo Elections: Interview with Ben Williams (Southern_Gentlem / kk4ewt)

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Well for one we all need to advertise Linux to the general public, it has been about 5 years since there was a push to advertise Linux to the general public. (example: The Kid Commerical by IBM in 2005)

Our displays at events need to show the public what Linux can do for them for their daily computer tasks. (examples be it from email, web browsing to using Linux for Amateur Radio Emergency Communications).

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Creating a laser light show with Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Every day, people are making all kinds of incredible software powered by Fedora. The Fedora user community is broad and diverse, and sometimes, we hear about things that we never imagined possible. Rochester Institute of Technology student and Fedora user Brendan Whitfield developed an open-source library for interfacing with laser projectors to create all kinds of awesome images and animations using lasers (including the Fedora logo)! We wanted to know more about the work Brendan was doing and interviewed him about his project, LZR.

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FESCo Elections: Interview with Germano Massullo (Caterpillar / germano)

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

I am a Fedora user since 2009.

I co-maintain various packages: BOINC, darktable, LemonPOS and ownCloud client package.

I do tests of Fedora pre-releases in order to have the most stable releases and I am proudly involved in the bug reporting process because I think that the best help you can provide to developers, is helping them finding issues in their software.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more