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Interviews

A step ahead on Drupal 8 with easy accessibility design

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Interviews
Drupal

The biggest mistake is bigger than Drupal: They don't consider it at all. This isn't a platform thing, it's a problem that is endemic to the web. Big companies get dragged into accessibility via legal threats. Small companies don't even think about it. Just the act of raising accessibility as an issue, and asking your team to keep it in mind throughout the design and development process is a big deal. You have to start somewhere.

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Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

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Interviews
Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3.

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Solving university needs with Drupal

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Interviews
Drupal

A veteran of the web publishing and sports media industries, Jeff Diecks leads professional services and client delivery at Mediacurrent and is an active member of the Drupal community. Jeff also organizes events for his local Louisiana Drupal Users Group and Drupalcamp New Orleans.

I was able to catch up with Jeff ahead of DrupalCon New Orleans 2016, where he'll share insights on site building tools to solve common university needs.

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Contributing to open source software with Ian Varley of Salesforce

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Interviews
OSS

With open source, you're expanding the sphere of people who might potentially care a lot about your code. You find others who have similar problems, and who can leverage your work and maybe even extend it. The knowledge that you've helped someone avoid "rebuilding the wheel" is really gratifying, and it's amplified when those people actually start getting so involved that they give you contributions of code or ideas. The project picks up steam, and you might even get unforeseen help tackling those issues you didn't have bandwidth to tackle yourself. Really, it's the gift that keeps on giving.

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The intersection of Drupal, IoT, and open hardware

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Interviews
Drupal

Back in the day, I was working at a large nonprofit in the "webmaster's office" of the marketing department and was churning out custom PHP/MySQL forms like nobody's business. I finally got weary of that and starting hunting around the web for a better way. I found Drupal 6 and starting diving in on my own. Years later, after a career shift and a move, I discovered the Portland Drupal User Group and landed a job as a full-time Drupal developer. I continued to regularly attend the meetups in Portland, which I found to be a great source of community, friendships, and professional development. Eventually, I landed a job with Lullabot as a trainer creating content for Drupalize.Me. Now, I'm managing the Drupalize.Me content pipeline, creating Drupal 8 content, and am very much involved in the Portland Drupal community. I'm this year's coordinator, finding and scheduling speakers.

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Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Gabriele is a Fedora Ambassador who works both locally and internationally. He is most impressed by the jovial and warm atmosphere within the project. Everyone can share suggestions, opinions and information in a friendly, collaborative environment. Trombini stresses that respect and the willingness to change are necessary to keep the Fedora Community strong. “Let’s try something, and if it doesn’t return the expected results, we should be ready to change our way,” says Trombini.

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GNU founder Stallman: ‘Open source is not free software’

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GNU
Interviews

Stallman is frequently described as an advocate of open source computing, even its father. It’s a characterization he vehemently denies. “I want people to associate me with free software, not open source,” he said. “I don’t want to make statements about open source except how it differs from free software.”

Or, as a statement on GNU.org sums it up: “The free software movement campaigns for your freedom in your computing, as a matter of justice. The open source non-movement does not campaign for anything.”

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Meet the man behind Ubuntu MATE

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Interviews
Ubuntu

“Ubuntu MATE is a stable, easy-to-use operating system with a configurable desktop environment. It is ideal for those who want the most out of their computers and prefer a traditional desktop metaphor. With modest hardware requirements, it is suitable for modern workstations, single board computers (such as as the Raspberry Pi) and older hardware alike. Ubuntu MATE makes modern computers fast and older computers usable.”

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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Adedayo Samuel

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Linux
Interviews

From my experience interviewing for jobs and to advance my career, it has been a personal desire of mine to understand the inner workings of a computer, and Linux provided a platform for doing that by having a design philosophy that doesn’t shy away from the command line so that caused me to dive right in!

I like open source because of the free software movement (we can always do with more free software), and more importantly because such a movement is capable of inspiring an operating system like Linux which powers servers of Fortune 500 companies and services we depend on like Banks, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and my favorite mobile OS – Android.

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What sets Krita apart from other open source digital painting tools

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Interviews

Definitely! Exposure to Linux and the open source communities opens a whole new world of opportunities to students that is independent of social status or financial ability. A lot of programs have student versions that you can use for practicing, or schools will get a group rate on licenses for programs, but any artwork made on either of those versions doesn't belong to you and can't be used for any sort of financial gain. Teaching with Krita or similar programs would empower the students to create artwork, game assets, or whatever that they truly own the rights to.

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More in Tux Machines

Your Beard Doesn’t Intimidate Me Anymore!

Linux is a community environment. Whether it’s the professionals over at RedHat, Canonical, and Suse or the guys who got together and decided to create Hannah Montana Linux, behind every project there’s usually a community. My first attempt at Linux came in the desert in Iraq. We were building a router lab and I had a couple of blade servers lying around but couldn’t get the Microsoft 2003 server key from our IT guys. So the other resident nerd on site and I started downloading Linux Distros to check them out. OpenSuse was awesome, Ubuntu was in its infancy, and I had no idea what I was doing. At night I’d trudge through forum after forum trying to figure out how the OS could help solve the problems I was creating and experiencing. There were a lot of posts for post-windows users and not all of them were kind. Many of them were written with a rather mocking or haughty tone. There was almost a standard litmus tests on posts where the person would casually mention how long they’ve been running Linux. Anything less than five years was a noob and others on the forum would point it out. There were a lot of good, kind voices, but they were often drowned out by those with a chip on their shoulder. (Read the rest)

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Data Science talks at Apache Big Data 2016
    Unfortunately, my talk is at the same time as Suneel’s, so I won’t be able to attend his, but these are all great talks and you should be sure to put as many as possible on your schedule if you’ll be in Vancouver!
  • Red Hat Platform Selected As Reference Platform For Telefonica Operators
    Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Telefonica Business Solutions, a provider of a wide range of integrated communication solutions for the B2B market, announced an agreement establishing Red Hat Mobile Application Platform as the global reference platform for operators within the Telefonica Group to mobilize the business processes of its customers on their path to digital transformation.
  • Telefonica and Red Hat Sign a Global Agreement to Help Companies Mobilize Business Processes
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, and Telefonica Business Solutions, a leading provider of a wide range of integrated communication solutions for the B2B market, today announced an agreement establishing Red Hat Mobile Application Platform as the global reference platform for operators within the Telefonica Group to mobilize the business processes of its customers on their path to digital transformation.
  • Fedora “update testing” with Bodhi
    Before and after Fedora releases, there are updates that keep coming in to fix bugs or add minor features to packages included in Fedora. To ensure that these are stable and don’t affect the performance of the existing system, we do “update testing”. Once testing is complete, we share our results and make sure that the developer is aware about the bugs and the success rate of the package. This article will explain how to participate in update testing and contribute to a high quality Fedora release!

Android Leftovers

This Is How the New Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon Theme Looks Like

Linux Mint project leader and maintainer Clement Lefebvre dropped some exciting news today about what users should expect from the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" operating system. Read more