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Interviews

The Big Android Dev Interview: Paul Lammertsma

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Android
Interviews

That's a really interesting question. I started in 2010, I think it was. I was actually in a molecular biology startup, and we were doing software for scientists, virologists, to basically plan experiments about cloning and genetic research and stuff like that. And a colleague of mine, he came into the office one day and he had bought an HTC Desire. He was really excited about it, and said "hey, over the weekend I made this app."

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How IBM’s LinuxONE Has Evolved For the New Open Source Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

LinuxONE is IBM’s Linux Server. The LinuxONE server runs the major distributions of Linux; SUSE, Red Hat and Canonical’s Ubuntu. The server also runs open source databases like Mongo DB , PostgreSQL and MariaDB allowing for both horizontal growth and vertical scale, as demonstrated by running a 2TB Mongo database without sharding. Several of the features built into this system support the constant innovation inherent in the open source movement while maintaining the performance and reliability required by Enterprise clients; for example, Logical Partitions (LPARs) allow clients to host a development environment on the same system as production with zero risk.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Maarten Edgar

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Android
Interviews

Good question! Well, I like [that] it's open source, I like that [in mobile development in particular] you make something and it's "one there." Specifically or Android, I like that it runs on a lot of different things. I've done some commercial Google Glass development — and, you know, it has a skin, but it is Android.

I like that you can do really useful stuff [with Android], it keeps on evolving and getting more interesting, so I like that.

What I don't like is... implementations of Android that are not truly Android — Samsung had this problem where, for example, you'd ask something in the system, you'd do a system call [asking] what kind of resolution it was and it would lie to you! It would say "oh no, I'm HDPI" when really it was an MDPI thing. And that just pisses me off. Incorrect documentation. And what's difficult is all the different device sizes. That is a challenge. Not necessarily something that I hate but it is challenging.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Jolanda Verhoef

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Android
Interviews

My name is Jolanda Verhoef and I've been developing for Android for six years, focusing mainly on architecture. [At the Big Android BBQ] I gave a talk on architecture together with RxJava. So, how can RxJava help you create a nice clean architecture. I work at a company called Blendle, which is a startup in the Netherlands, and before that I worked at companies like Philips, Dutch railway stations, Enexis, stuff like that. And I built my own app for geocaching as well.

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2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Ahmed Alkabary: A Recent Graduate and Aspiring SysAdmin

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Interviews

For me, I don’t just appreciate the Linux operating system but I also feel like it has become my life. Whenever I’m on a Linux based computer I feel like I’m at home. You can say it is a passion that has taken many years of cultivating to become integrated in my life the way it is today.

In 2011 I was eager to purchase a brand new computer, but to my dismay the shop had only one computer that met my requirements. Although unbeknownst to me the computer had a specific operating system that I was unfamiliar with. The operating system was pre-installed with Linux, specifically openSuse. I was so hesitant to purchase the computer but proceeded anyway. I hoped to change the operating system once I got home, but I was unsure of what came over me to keep Linux. But to this day I feel I have yet to make a decision that would have a greater impact on my life then the day I decided to keep Linux.

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Be Cautious With Containers Says FutureAdvisor’s DevOps Director

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Interviews

Docker is a fantastic technology, but it’s not one that’s well understood. If we take a look at the lessons of the past, there was more hype than understanding around cloud as well — and before that, around virtualization. I’m seeing the same patterns repeat themselves here, and in some circles this is a far from popular viewpoint.

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Siddarth Sharma: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Sharma is a software engineer on the Red Hat product security team. He focuses on security of storage products such as Ceph and Gluster. He used to work as a software maintenance engineer at Red Hat, looking after the GNOME and KDE desktop packages. “I learned from the most talented people in the software security industry and still have a lot to learn,” said Sharma. He started using Linux in 2004 with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3, but later switched to Fedora Core 2.

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Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Ronni Jensen

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Linux
Interviews

I've actually been distro-hopping for a long time, going back and forth between various Debian-derivatives, but the last couple of years I've been a fan of openSUSE. I like openSUSE's way of doing things and that I have a choice between rock-solid (Leap) and bleeding edge (Tumbleweed). Right now, though, my computers are running a mix of openSUSE Leap, CentOS 7, and RHEL 7.

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Interview with Thomas Cameron – Senior Principal Cloud Evangelist at Red Hat

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Red Hat
Interviews

I’d love to show that Red Hat folks outside of the Fedora project are
committed to the greater community. I’d also love to get folks up to
speed on container security (the topic of my presentation).

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Luis Motta: How Do You Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Luis Motta was born in 1963 on the same day as Mick Jagger, which may explain why he has been a rock and roll guitar player since 1982. Motta plays in three different bands. He and his friends play gigs at local bars with a preference for heavy rock. Motta says, “Louder is better!” His favorite music groups are Rush, System of a Down, and Red Fang. As a guitarist, he likes Alex Lifeson. “Today, me and a friend, Jesiel Rocha, give lectures on the use of free software for music recording,” said Luis.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

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Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.