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Interviews

HP's Marten Mickos: Open Source Is Not a Business Model

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Interviews
OSS

"Open source is a production model. In some cases, it is a distribution model ... . You need a business model for any business that you build, but open source in itself is not that business model. Just like if you have a manufacturing branch and you use robots or you don't use robots. That is a production question, but it is not a business model for the business you are in."

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Meet the channel manager: Red Hat

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Red Hat
Interviews

Not so long ago, 30-year industry veteran Colin Garro was entrenched in the world of Microsoft. During a 14-year tenure, he was a managing consultant and public sector sales director there, ultimately ending up as national channel sales manager. Then in July 2012, Garro leapt to open source, joining Red Hat as the new director for channel sales and development

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Also: Still no Red Hat Linux on Azure, but VMware looks to be on its way

Five Red Hat Leaders Named 2015 CRN Channel Chiefs

Eric Mesa: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Software is the biggest reason I love FLOSS and love Fedora. I love that the software is libre and it’s nice that it’s very often gratis. On both my desktop and netbook I’m running the latest Fedora (21 at this time). On my desktop I LOVE using KDE. Its use of Activities along with Virtual Desktops helps me to organize my work so perfectly.

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INTERVIEW: TIM O’REILLY

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Interviews
OSS

There are many memorable quotes attributed to Tim O’Reilly. Which isn’t surprising. He’s been talking for decades about open data, the internet and the direction technology is taking us. Like Arthur C Clarke, much of what he’s predicted, talked about and written has proven incredibly judicious. He popularised the ideas behind ‘Web 2.0’, as well as the incoming wave and impact of social media. He believes in an open government and that the internet will become a global brain of networks and things.

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NGINX: The secret heart of the modern web

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Server
Interviews
OSS

Sarah Novotny is a technology evangelist and community leader for NGINX. I first met her at OSCON, where she's one of the program chairs. She makes it look easy on stage, but it's a tough job to help organize one of the largest open source events held each year.

She's also a self-proclaimed geek and recently made my list of 30 community managers to follow on Twitter. At NGINX, Novotny gets to work on a project that she describes as "the secret heart of the modern web." NGINX is one of the most-used web servers and is gaining popularity, which is one of the many reasons why she's excited to be part of its growing open source community.

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Where do we stand after 30 years after the founding of the Free Software Foundation?

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GNU
Interviews

There is a growing concern about government surveillance. At the same time, those of us who live and breathe technology do so because it provides us with a service and freedom to share our lives with others.

There is a tacit assumption that once we leave the store, the device we have in our pocket, backpack, or desk is ours. We buy a computer, a tablet, a smartphone, and we use applications and apps without even thinking about who really owns the tools and whether we truly own any of it. You purchase a device, yet you are not free to modify it or the software on it in any way. It begs the question of who really owns the device and the software?

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a nonprofit with a worldwide mission to promote computer user freedom and defend the rights of all free software users. FSF proudly promotes the idea of free software—not "free" as in "free beer," but "free" as in "free to modify the code, share the code, and distribute it freely."

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Redesigning the Linux video system from the ground up

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Interviews
OSS

Being a good open source citizen—that's where it starts. For Jon Cruz, navigating various technical opportunities over the years eventually led him there. Jon recently started working in the Open Source Group at Samsung where he works on the Wayland project as well as IoTivity, an infrastructure for the Internet of Things.

Cruz's open source journey began when he started contributing to the Inkscape community. His connections with Inkscape contributors eventually led him to his current role at Samsung. I think it's important to note that this is a common story for many people who get involved with open source. The first step is to find the right project and start contributing—you never know what career opportunities could stem from that first step.

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Rocket and the application container spec

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Interviews
OSS

To learn more about Rocket, and the Application Container spec which underlies is, we caught up with Jonathan Boulle. Boulle is an engineer at CoreOS who is leading the development of Rocket and doing a lot of the coordination work around the App Container spec. Before working at CoreOS, Boulle worked on a similar project at Twitter that never quite saw the light of day, but was able to apply some of the ideas and experiences to his current work on Rocket.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Rainey Reitman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation

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GNU
Interviews
Legal

This is the latest installment of our Licensing and Compliance Lab's series on free software developers who choose GNU licenses for their works.

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Rainey Reitman, Activism Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about their new EFF Alerts mobile app.

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The Linux Setup - Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Interviews

I met Matthew at LinuxCon 2013 and have been hounding him for an interview ever since then. He’s worth the wait, though. He really gets under the hood of his GNOME setup and he has some great things to say about the power of open source software. Also, I’ve mentioned this before, but it’s worth repeating: Fedora has been great for me lately. I know there have always been Fedora fans, but my experience with it was always that there were one or two annoyingly broken things in each release. But 21 is solid. Like Ubuntu solid. And that’s thanks to the work of people like Matthew.

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