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Interviews

Seneca College realizes value of open source

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Red Hat has done a lot of work with CDOT, lately specializing in Fedora for ARM processors. Pidora, the Fedora Linux Remix specifically targeted to the Rasberry Pi, was primarily developed at CDOT.

Another company that we have been working with lately is Blindside Networks. They do a lot of work with CDOT on the BigBlueButton project, which is a web conferencing tool for online education.

NexJ is a Toronto-based software development firm that has worked with CDOT on various aspects of open health tools on the server side and integration of medical devices with smart phones.

We have recently started working on the edX platform, where developers around the globe are working to create a next-generation online learning platform.

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Qubes: The Open Source OS Built for Security

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Security

No matter how good the code review process is, or how high the standards for acceptance, applications will always have bugs, says Joanna Rutkowska, founder and CEO of Invisible Things Lab. So will drivers. And filesystems.

“Nobody, not even Google Security Team, can find and patch all those bugs in all the desktop apps we all use,” Rutkowska says in the Q&A interview, below.

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OpenDaylight executive director spells out where this open source SDN efforts stand

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Interviews
OSS

So if I compare it to Linux. Linux is in my computer, in my car, it’s in a million things outside of the server room. In the same way I think a large percentage of OpenDaylight will be used and leveraged that way. You will have a few people who grab the code, compile it themselves and deploy it in their environment, but mostly for a proof of concept (POC). If an end user hears about SDN and thinks it’s great, they might find themselves needing to POC 15 different solutions. Do I need an overlay? Well, you’ve got to look at three or four overlays out there because they all do things differently. And if you want to figure out how to use OpenFlow, well there are different flavors of OpenFlow, so you’re going to pull a couple of different ones.

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Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral.

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Open Source is driving disruption in technology: Interview with Nithya Ruff of SanDisk

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Interviews
OSS

Nithya A. Ruff is the director of SanDisk Open Source Strategy Office. The company recently joined The Linux Foundation and we met up with her at LinuxCon to understand SanDisk’s plans for Linux and Open Source.

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There is no reason at all to use MySQL: Michael Widenius

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Interviews
OSS

MySQL was once the most popular open source database (it still is), but it’s popularity and deployment is declining under the ownership of Oracle. The founder of MySQL Michael Widenius “Monty” was not happy when Oracle announced to acquire MySQL through Sun Microsystem. He created MariaDB, an open source, drop-in replacement of MySQL, which is gaining popularity lately.

It’s not only become the default database of the leading open source operating systems, but is also replacing MySQL at WikiMedia and other major organizations and companies. Recently SkySQL merged with MariaDB’s parent company Monty Program Ab, increasing its developer force. We reached out to Monty to talk about the changing database landscape. Read on…

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Interview with GNU remotecontrol

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

GNU remotecontrol is a web application serving as a management tool for reading from and writing to multiple IP enabled heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) thermostats, and other building automation devices. While various IP thermostat manufacturers have offered web portals exclusively for their users to remotely access and adjust the settings of individual thermostats, they do not provide a unified management tool for multiple thermostats. The goal of GNU remotecontrol is to provide this management tool for individuals and companies alike.

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How Amazon Web Services Uses Linux and Open Source

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

Amazon Web Services first launched in 2006 with one instance and one operating system: Amazon Linux. The cloud computing giant has since expanded to offer customers the option of running on more than 30 instance types and more than 10 operating systems, but Linux, Xen and other open source projects remain the core technologies behind AWS.

“We view open source as a companion to AWS's business model,” said Chris Schlaeger, director of software development at Amazon Web Services and managing director of the Amazon Development Center Germany GmbH.

Schlaeger, who leads the team that develops Amazon’s cloud computing service, EC2, as well as Amazon Linux, will give a keynote presentation at CloudOpen Europe, Oct. 13-15 in Dusseldorf, Germany. Here he discusses how AWS uses Linux, the Amazon Linux operating system, the company's new development offices in Germany, and what he'll cover in his keynote presentation.

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Raspberry Pi-powered in-car computer project shifts up a gear

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

After watching classic TV shows such as Knight Rider and Street Hawk in his youth, IT professional and Raspberry Pi enthusiast Derek Knaggs was inspired to create a low-cost in-car computer using a Raspberry Pi.
The Pi sits in the centre console of his Ford Focus, wired to the display of an Xtrons DVD player (optional) as well as two TFT screens in the rear headrests. Control is via a Xenta wireless keyboard with mouse touchpad, while a smartphone can be used as a wireless hotspot to give the Pi an internet connection on the move.
Having recently added a reverse camera to his already top-notch project, we caught up with Derek to learn more about it…

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Matthew Garrett's Advice on Hardware, Linux Kernel Careers, and Fruit Flies

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The most popular questions posed to Linux kernel developer Matthew Garrett during his Reddit AMA this week related to kernel hacking and hardware issues. But Garrett, a senior security engineer at Nebula, answered frankly on a variety of subjects that ranged from technical issues in the kernel, to his workstation setup, to how to kill fruit flies and why he likes the movie Hackers. Here is a digest of some of the more kernel-related questions and answers (plus a fruit fly question, for more flavor.)

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable. Read more

Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more