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Interviews

HP5: A CMS plugin for creating HTML5 interactive content

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Interviews
OSS

Before working fulltime on H5P, many of us on the Core Team were deeply involved with open source projects. Over the years we have been consulted for Drupal based projects, and we’ve always tried to contribute back to the Drupal community as much as we can. H5P is installed on over 7,000 websites. It is used by hundreds of universities, including Ivy League universities. It is being used by huge companies, including Fortune 50 companies, and other big organizations like parts of the UN.

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LibreOffice contributor interview: Leif Lodahl

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LibO
Interviews

Until September 1st I was working as project manager and business developer in the company Magenta. From September 1st I’m working as IT architect at City of Ballerup (Ballerup Municipality). My work for (and with) LibreOffice has, until recently, been both professional and in my spare time.

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Pitfalls to Avoid When Implementing Node.js and Containers

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Interviews

The use of containers and Node.js are on the rise as the two technologies are a good match for effectively developing and deploying microservice architectures. In a recent survey from the Node.js Foundation, the project found that 45 percent of developers that responded to the survey were using Node.js with this technology.

As more enterprises and startups alike look to implement these two technologies together, there are key questions that they need to ask before they begin their process and common pitfalls they want to avoid.

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Red Hat CEO on Microsoft, Google, and Cutting Edge Software

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Red Hat
Interviews

Even among technology companies, Red Hat has to stand out as one of the geekiest firms in the business.

The enterprise company offers services and support around the Linux open-source operating system, which non-techies can think of as a free equivalent of Microsoft’s Windows and Apple’s MacOS. Developers and IT operators, however, regard Linux as more than just a free service: It’s the underpinning of some of the most popular apps and software used today.

For instance, if you’ve ordered a car ride from Uber or bought digital storage from Amazon, it’s likely Linux OS was in a corporate data center somewhere along the line, making sure the appropriate software was chugging along.

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Fireside Chat: GKH Talks Licensing, Email, and Aging Maintainers

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Interviews

No one aside from Linus Torvalds has more influence or name recognition in the Linux Kernel project than Greg Kroah-Hartman. More commonly known as GKH, the ex SUSE kernel developer and USB driver maintainer is now a Linux Foundation Fellow and the full-time maintainer of the -stable Linux branch and staging subsystem, among other roles. In a recent Fireside Chat with Kroah-Hartman at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Tim Bird, Chair of the Architecture Group of the Linux Foundation’s CE Working Group, described him as the hardest working person he knows.

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How I Use Android: EvolveSMS and Talon developer Luke Klinker

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Android
Interviews

Luke Klinker knows his way around app development.

Klinker started building his Android app empire when he was a student at the University of Iowa. He embraced Google's Material Design standard and worked with his brother to create clean and intuitive apps that were packed with features and yet easy to use.

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Keeping up the fight for free software

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GNU
Interviews

Here's John Sullivan's vision for a more just world: You pop into your favorite electronics retailer and encounter a panoply of new gadgets, each one more alluring and astounding than the last—and each one guaranteed to respect your freedom. Your freedom to inspect its software. Your freedom to modify that software. Your freedom to have that software collect only the data you wish.

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An introduction to Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund

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Interviews
Moz/FF
OSS

Thanks Mark. Mozilla is a unique institution—it's both a nonprofit mission-driven organization and a technology industry corporation. We build open source software (most notably the Firefox Web browser) and we are champions for the open Internet in technical and political fora. We've been a global leader on well-known policy issues like privacy and net neutrality, and we're also very active on most of today's big topics including copyright reform, encryption, and software vulnerabilities.

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Leslie Zhai Talks 20 Years of KDE in China

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KDE
Interviews

In 2002, as a computer science major university student, I went to a Legal Authoried software store in Wuhan, Guangputun, and bought Redhat7 including four install CDs, three src.rpm CDs and a very exquisite user manual for only RMB 50, because other software for Windows 98 was too expensive to a univerty student! It was my first time to use KDE 3. Yes I chose KDE as my default desktop enviroment, but I tried GNOME of course. Wink Then I tried to migrate my university's course assignment developed in Turbo C to compile with GCC. I used Konsole and VIM to edit my source code, I tried Emacs but I did not know how to make coffee with it, so I switched to VIM Wink and my teachers switched to use Redhat8 instead of Windows 98 when teaching operating system courses.

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How Apache Kafka is powering a real-time data revolution

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Interviews
OSS

There are several things to think about while building a company, but the ones that are particularly critical for building a successful company based on an open source technology are evangelism, community influence, the business model, and having the pragmatism to balance investment across these areas. Open source technology greatly simplifies the adoption problem for a new technology and empowers developers to use the technology that is right for building products. Essentially, the developer is the new buyer.

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Fedora News

  • Elections 2016: Nominate community members to Fedora leadership
    With Fedora 25 out the door a couple of weeks ago, Fedora is once again moving ahead towards Fedora 26. As usual after a new release, the Fedora Elections are getting into gear. There are a fair number of seats up for election this release, across both the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo) and the Fedora Council. The elections are one of the ways you can have an impact on the future of Fedora by nominating and voting. Nominate other community members (or self-nominate) to run for a seat in either of these leadership bodies to help lead Fedora. For this election cycle, nominations are due on December 12th, 2016, at 23:59:59 UTC. It is important to get nominations in quickly before the window closes. This article helps explain both leadership bodies and how to cast a nomination.
  • Endless Sky now available on Fedora
    Endless Sky is a 2D space trading and combat game similar to Escape Velocity. The game sets you as a beginning pilot, just having made a down payment on your very first starship. You’re given a choice between a shuttle, a freighter or a fighter. Depending on what ship you choose, you will need to figure out how to earn money to outfit and eventually upgrade your ship. You can transport passengers, run cargo, mine asteroids or even hunt pirates. It’s an open-ended game that blends the top-down action of a 2D space shooter with the depth and replayability of a 4X.
  • Analysis is confusing
    I’ve known of affinity mapping, and even tried to use sticky notes to figure out some of my data in the first UX project I did. Unfortunately, as I found out at the time, analysis of the data I get in UX research doesn’t really lend itself to being done alone. Much like statistics, I suspect. I’m not at all sure how UX consultants do their analyses, given this!

What lies ahead for open source technology in 2017?

Open source technology is a positive example of the way the internet can encourage global collaboration working towards a more secure and creative future. Here are four predictions for open source technologies in 2017: Read more

Android Leftovers

Remembering a friend: Matthew Williams

One of the things about working in open source software communities is that you are always moving forward. It’s hard not to get a sense of momentum and progress when it seems you are constantly striving to improve and build on the work you and others have done before. But sometimes you have to pause to reflect, because sometimes there is loss. Read more