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Linux kernel-bypassing Quobyte plug-in goes with the TensorFlow for faster file access

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Linux
Google

Linux-loving hyperscale types at Euro startup Quobyte have pushed out a plug-in for its Data Centre File System, used in HPC-style workloads, that enables TensorFlow apps to access its files directly instead of having to traipse through the Linux kernel.

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SELinux in Android and Google Pixel 4/3a

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Android
Linux
Google

Google Openwashing of Its Surveillance 'Cloud'

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Server
Google
OSS

GAFAM Competing Over Who's Friendliest to Free/Open Source Software

Filed under
Server
Google
OSS
  • Google Takes a Friendlier Path to Open Source Than Amazon

    Google recently announced partnerships with MongoDB, Redis Labs, and several other open-source data management companies. The crux of the partnership is that these companies' offerings will be more tightly integrated into Google's Cloud Platform. Customers will be able to use these select applications from one unified Google Cloud interface, rely on Google's technical support for these apps, and receive a unified bill for all.

    Financials were not disclosed, though TechCrunch suggested some sort of profit-sharing arrangement. While these open-source companies probably don't like giving away part of their revenue, Google is also taking care of associated customer support costs; in addition, some revenue on wider distribution is certainly better than nothing, which is what these companies receive when a user opts for Amazon's in-house imitations.

  • Google Cloud challenges AWS with new open-source integrations

    Google today announced that it has partnered with a number of top open-source data management and analytics companies to integrate their products into its Google Cloud Platform and offer them as managed services operated by its partners.

Google challenges AWS with open-source support

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Google
OSS

At the Google Cloud Next conference Google announced new and expanded partnerships with several open-source businesses. Interesting, several of these have changed their licenses in no small part because they felt Amazon Web Services (AWS) was strip-mining their code.

These partners are MongoDB, Confluent, DataStax, Elastic, InfluxData, Neo4j, and Redis Labs. These new partnerships offer Google Cloud customers managed database services with efforts made to optimize performance and latency between the service and application. Customers will get a unified user interface for app management.

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Games: New Titles on GNU/Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch and More

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Google

The Demise of Google+ and the Case for FOSS

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Google
OSS

So much for Google+. As of April 2, 2019, the social media site’s personal accounts are no longer available for posting or comments, although for the time-being users can still access their accounts for downloading data. News of the shutdown proved surprisingly disturbing to me, reminding me of why I have used free and open source software exclusively for years.

Personally, I never warmed to Google+. Although I used it almost from the start, for me it was always a poor third to Facebook and Twitter among social sites. Although it often had better discussions, it wasn’t where most of my friends and acquaintances were — which, after all, is what social media is about. I would post a few times a week, and respond to comments, but I rarely checked other accounts, and never took part in any groups. Still, I would usually login for a few minutes before beginning my day’s work.

Yet somehow I couldn’t let the news go. In the last month of Google+’s existence I found myself counting down the days. On the morning it was shuttered, I automatically started to go the site, and when I remembered it was no longer active, I had a flash of anger I couldn’t explain. Before I knew it, I was having a flashback to the mid-1990s and the end of OS/2. Once again, a company was making decisions that affected my computer use without bothering to consult me.

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Android Open Source Project Updates

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Android
Google

Google 'Sabotages' Crouton Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS Security Updates Break Crouton: Here’s The Fix

    For many users, Google’s Crostini project that brings native Linux apps support to Chrome OS is still a ways off from being a viable solution. We are seeing more and more updates that are giving Crostini the tools needed to forgo dual-booting a Linux distro but until full GPU support becomes a reality, Crouton is still a go-to for many.

    The keeper of Crouton, David Schneider, is a Google hardware engineer and he does an excellent job of maintaining the GitHub that houses Crouton and all its goodies.

    Yesterday, in the same GitHub project, David posted that recent security enhancements have broken the long-used method of installing Crouton on Chrome OS and in turn has called upon the internet to update tutorials and how-tos for the benefit of all who use Crouton.

    All-in-all, the end result is the same but the method in which the installer is launched requires some tweaking. Here’s the new method for running Crouton on Chrome OS.

  • Chrome OS 73 Stable version: Here’s what you need to know

    Last week, Google announced the availability of Chrome OS 73 in the Stable channel and began to push the platform update out to devices. Since the rollout is always staggered, my Pixel Slate wasn’t upgraded until recently so I’ve only now just got a chance to go through what’s new and improved.

Google's KUnit Moving Forward As A Solid Unit Testing Framework For The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Google

Announced last October by a Google engineer was KUnit as a Linux kernel unit testing framework and a proper solution unlike some of the current in-tree kernel testing facilities. The latest KUnit patches have been volleyed for review while waiting to see if it will be accepted soon into the mainline kernel.

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Android Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 19.04 comes refreshed with the Linux 5.0 kernel

The heart of the Linux desktop beats on with the latest release of Canonical's Ubuntu distribution: Ubuntu 19.04. But, in addition, the server version comes ready with the latest cloud and container tools. Now, if you're using Ubuntu in production, you probably should stick with the Long Term Support Ubuntu 18.04. After all, it comes with ten years of support. But there's a lot of tempting goodness in Disco Dingo, Ubuntu 19.04's playful moniker. Read more

Some theming fixes to arrive with Plasma 5.16

One of the things which makes Plasma so attractive is the officially supported option to customize also the style, and that beyond colors and wallpaper, to allow users to personalize the look to their likes. And designers have picked up on that and did a good set of custom designs (store.kde.org lists at the time of writing 454 themes). Read more