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Chromium and Firefox: New Features

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time

    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time.

    The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time.

    "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."

  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today

    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla.

    Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Pixelbook leak: Google's new high-end Chromebook expected October 4

Filed under
Google

According to Droid Life, on October 4, Google will release the first new retail version of the Chromebook Pixel since 2015, the Pixelbook.

The Chomebook Pixel was the Rolls-Royce of Chromebooks. It was faster, more powerful, and came with a better display than any other laptop in its day. Google, however, decided that, while the company would still release new Pixels for in-house use, it wouldn't sell them.

Thanks to Chromebook Pixel fans, Google has elected to start selling this luxury Chromebook again.

Read more

Android/Linux Devices: Fire OS/Fire HD, Chromebook Pixel, Pixel 2 XL

Filed under
Android
Google
  • New Amazon Fire HD 10 adds full HD display, hands-free Alexa

    Amazon has made concessions to hit that price point, of course—mostly via the limitations of Fire OS—but let's start with the good stuff. The 10.1-inch, 1920×1200 pixel IPS screen is colourful, bright, and has excellent viewing angles. It's laminated to the glass, too, making it clear and easy to read. The shiny rear surface of the old Fire 10 has been given the shove, replaced with a hard-wearing, textured plastic that provides plenty of grip, without feeling cheap (or, at least more premium than the price tag suggests).

  • Meet the really cheap Google Home Mini and really expensive Chromebook Pixel 3

    Android fansite Droid Life is on fire today with a big series of leaks of Google's upcoming hardware launches. After showing off pictures and pricing for the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, the site has details on the new "Google Home Mini," a second smartphone-powered Daydream VR headset, and a new flagship Chromebook Pixel.

    First up is the new "Google Home Mini," a smaller version of the Google Home, which will retail for just $50. The colors here are "Chalk" (white/grey), "Charcoal" (black), and "Coral" (red). Like the Amazon Echo Dot, the Google Home Mini skips the thumping speaker setup for a smaller, cheaper form factor meant more for commands and Q&A sessions rather than for music.

  • The Pixel 2 XL price jumps $80, now starts at $849

Google Code-in 2017 lets students win prizes while learning about open source

Filed under
Google
OSS

Open source is changing the world, and it is important that children get educated on the subject as early as possible. Its a competitive workforce out there, and students need to be prepared. Of course, learning about open source doesn't have to be a chore -- gaining knowledge can sometimes be fun too.

Google does a lot for the open source community -- far more than just contributing code. Actually, the search giant hosts two very important education-focused open source events -- "Google Code-in" for younger teen students and "Google Summer of Code" for University-level learners. Today, the company announces the 8th annual edition of the former -- Google Code-in 2017. Not only can these teens gain experience by working on an open source project, but they can also win prizes!

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Chrome 61 Released, Mozilla Firefox Bugfix for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • New in Chrome 61
  • Chrome 61 Brings WebUSB, JavaScript Modules & More
  • Chrome 61 Enters Stable Channel, Now Rolling Out For Windows, Mac and Linux

    Chrome 61 has finally entered the stable channel with a slew of developer-focused features and general security fixes. The desktop version for Chrome 61 has started rolling out today, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. It brings the latest WebUSB API, which enables web apps to interact with computer peripherals like keyboards, mice and printers.

  • Google Chrome 61 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Today Google launched version 61 of the Chrome browser for Windows, Mac, and Linux. With this release, we have 21 security updates, numerous improvements and bug fixes, and three APIs that allow developers to further enhance their sites and apps.

  • Mozilla Firefox Finally Fixes An Awkward, 11 Year Old Linux Bug

    It's taken more than a decade, but after enough user complaints, there is finally a patch queued for Firefox 57 to fix an arguably annoying default behavior of Firefox on Linux/Unix systems.

    The default setting on Firefox has long been when the middle mouse button is clicked to open an URL based upon the contents of the clipboard. Most users don't expect this behavior by default and many have found it to be incredibly awkward accidentally opening a new tab with some web-page based upon what's in your copy-paste clipboard.

Tanoshi is an Android laptop for kids with Google's parental control Family Link app pre-installed

Filed under
Android
Google

There is no shortage of tablets and computers aimed at children, but one Silicon Valley startup is betting its bootlaces that kids and parents will lap up its new Android-powered laptop-tablet hybrid.

The Tanoshi is touted as a “fun, safe, educational, and affordable” two-in-one computer designed with pre-teens in mind, and it is among the first machines to ship with Family Link — Google’s recently announced parental control app — pre-installed.

Read more

GNOME: GSoC Projects

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • GSoC part 15: submission

    This is the last entry in the Google Summer of Code series that I have been writing weekly for the last three months. It is different from the usual updates in that I won’t be discussing development progress: rather, this will be the submission report for the project as a whole. I’ll be discussing the "why?" behind the project, the plan that my mentor and I came up with to execute the project, the work I have done over the summer including a video of the result, the things that are left to work on, what I’ve learned during the project and finally, the links to the code that I have written for the actual submission. Of course I finish with a thank-you. Enjoy!

  • Piper Has Turned Into A Very Competent Mouse Configuration UI For Linux

    Student developer Jente Hidskes' work this summer on improving the Piper GTK3 user-interface for configuring gaming mice on Linux via libratbag is now the latest example of a very successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project.

    Jente was able to provide some much needed improvements to this GTK3 user-interface for configuring Linux mice via the libratbag daemon. Among the work he accomplished this summer were support for mouse profiles, resolution configuration, LED configuration, button mappings, welcome and error screens, and more.

  • GNOME Games Now Supports Controller Reassignment

    Thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there is a branch pending for allowing game controllers to be re-assigned within GNOME Games.

    GNOME Games, of course, is the GTK desktop program to browse your video game library and when it comes to retro games, even play them within GNOME Games thanks to libretro, etc.

Google Chrome Vs. Chromium

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google Chrome is currently the most popular browser on desktop PCs. It has over 54% of desktop users usually in the Windows world choosing it over the other browsers. Here in the Linux world, Google Chrome is not the most popular as most distros prefer to ship other web browsers. The most popular of these is Firefox whilst others prefer Chromium. Chromium for all intents and purposes is very identical to Google Chrome. They share everything from looks to extensions, engine, and features. So why don’t they (Linux distros) just ship with Google Chrome? What are the differences between Google Chrome and Chromium?

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Gentoo-Based Chrome OS for Work, Gentoo Sources Change

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Introducing Chrome Enterprise

    Since we launched Chrome OS in 2009, our goal has been to build the simplest, fastest, and most secure operating system possible. And we’ve been inspired by all the ways we’ve seen businesses embrace Chrome, from Chromebooks in the office, to shared Chrome devices in the field, to signage and kiosks for customer engagement in retail. But with so many different business needs—not to mention so many different devices—companies have also told us they want a single, cost-effective solution that gives them the flexibility and control to keep their employees connected. That’s why today we’re announcing Chrome Enterprise.

  • Google Rolls Out Chrome Enterprise: Chrome OS For Work

    Google has today announced Chrome Enterprise as a subscription service to take Chrome OS and Chromebooks into more work environments.

    Chrome Enterprise makes Chrome OS more friendly for professional work environments and lets IT/administrators manage Chrome extensions, printers, handle operating system updates, and provides other features like single sign-on support and more. Chrome Enterprise costs $50 USD per device per year and includes 24/7 enterprise support.

  • Switch to Gentoo sources

    You've might already read it on the Gentoo news site, the Hardened Linux kernel sources are removed from the tree due to the grsecurity change where the grsecurity Linux kernel patches are no longer provided for free. The decision was made due to supportability and maintainability reasons.

    That doesn't mean that users who want to stick with the grsecurity related hardening features are left alone. Agostino Sarubbo has started providing sys-kernel/grsecurity-sources for the users who want to stick with it, as it is based on minipli's unofficial patchset. I seriously hope that the patchset will continue to be maintained and, who knows, even evolve further.

    Personally though, I'm switching to the Gentoo sources, and stick with SELinux as one of the protection measures. And with that, I might even start using my NVidia graphics card a bit more, as that one hasn't been touched in several years (I have an Optimus-capable setup with both an Intel integrated graphics card and an NVidia one, but all attempts to use nouveau for the one game I like to play - minecraft - didn't work out that well).

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today's howtos

Graphics: NVIDIA, Nouveau, X.Org Server

  • NVIDIA Making Progress On Server-Side GLVND: Different Drivers For Different X Screens
    While NVIDIA isn't doing much to help out Nouveau, at least the company is contributing to the open-source Linux graphics ecosystem in other ways. In addition to presenting at XDC2017 this week on the Unix device memory allocator API and DeepColor / HDR support, they also presented on server-side GLVND. Server-side GLVND is separate from the client-side GLVND (OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library) that evolved over the past few years and with modern Linux systems is supported both by Mesa and the NVIDIA binary driver. Server-side GLVND can help PRIME laptops and other use-cases like XWayland where potentially dealing with multiple GPU drivers touching X.
  • Nouveau Developers Remain Blocked By NVIDIA From Advancing Open-Source Driver
    Longtime Nouveau contributors Martin Peres and Karol Herbst presented at this week's XDC2017 X.Org conference at the Googleplex in Mountain View. It was a quick talk as they didn't have a whole lot to report on due to their open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver efforts largely being restricted by NVIDIA Corp.
  • X.Org Server 1.20 Expected Around January With New Features
    X.Org Server 1.19 is already almsot one year old and while X.Org is currently well off its six month release cadence, version 1.20 is being figured out for an early 2018 release. Adam Jackson of Red Hat who has been serving as the xorg-server release manager held a quick session on Friday at XDC2017 to figure out what's needed for X.Org Server 1.20. His goal is to see X.Org Server 1.20 released in time for making the Fedora 28 version. For that to happen nicely, he's hoping to see xorg-server 1.20 released in January. The Fedora 28 beta freeze is the middle of March so there is still time for the 1.20 release to slip while making the F28 Linux distribution update.

ASUS Launches Its Thinnest and Lightest Flippable Chromebook, the Flip C101

ASUS announced a new Chromebook on its website, the Flip C101, which is a smaller and lightweight version of the C302 model. Featuring a 10.1-inch touchscreen display, the all-new Chromebook is priced at only $299 in the US. Read more

FreeBSD 10.4-RC2 Now Available

The second RC build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Read more