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Chrome's Latest

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Google
Web

NYU applies open source Google AI to diagnose lung cancer

Filed under
Google
OSS

If recent research is any indication, artificial intelligence (AI) has a bright future in medicine. Nvidia developed an AI system that can generate synthetic scans of brain cancer. Google subsidiary DeepMind has demonstrated a machine learning algorithm that can recommend treatment for more than 50 eye diseases with 94 percent accuracy. And in newly published research, New York University (NYU) showed how AI might aid in lung cancer diagnosis.

A paper today published in the journal Nature Medicine (“Classification and mutation prediction from non-small cell lung cancer histopathology images using deep learning”) describes how a team of NYU researchers retrained Google’s Inception v3, an open source convolutional neural network architected for object identification, to detect certain forms of lung cancers with 97 percent accuracy.

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Also: Google AI Tool Identifies a Tumor's Mutations From an Image

The 'New' Microsoft

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Moz/FF
Web
  • Windows derails Chrome, Firefox installation, promotes Microsoft Edge instead [iophk: "Where are the Microsoft apologists on this? They sure have been quiet."]

    Microsoft is trying a new tactic to get people to use its Edge browser: a warning dialog box that interrupts the installation of other browsers like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome.

  • Microsoft tests ‘warning’ Windows 10 users not to install Chrome or Firefox

    While the prompts can be turned off, they’re yet another example of Microsoft infesting Windows 10 with annoying ads and pop-ups. Some similar prompts already appear and attempt to push Chrome or Firefox users to use Edge, but this latest one steps up Microsoft’s war against Chrome even further. It’s not clear why Microsoft thinks it’s a good idea to include these irritating prompts, as all they’re likely to do is anger Windows 10 users rather than convince them to switch to Edge.

  • Microsoft Tests Warning Windows 10 Users About Installing Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox [iophk: "yeah, Microsoft "loves" FOSS"]

    While the warning does not block the installation, it is a blatant move from Microsoft to try and stop users from downloading a rival's Web browser. As per a CNET report, test was confirmed in Windows 10 version 1809, build 17758.1. It is worth noting that it is a preview release, which will not be available to the general public for another month or so. In a statement to CNET, Microsoft referred to its Windows test programme, and said, "We're currently testing this functionality with insiders only. The Windows Insider Program enables Microsoft to test different features, functionality and garner feedback before rolling out broadly. Customers remain in control and can choose the browser of their choice." The Verge, on the other hand, cites its sources to say the warning will not make its way to the Windows 10 October 2018 Update.

Chrome 69 Tip for GNU/Linux and Beta of Next Chrome Release

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Change UI theme in Google Chrome 69

    Say what you will about Chrome, but over the years, it has maintained a rather consistent look & feel. The changes are mostly done under the hood and they do not interfere with how the user interacts with the browser. But occasionally, mostly guided by their wider influence in the OS space, especially the mobile world, Google has made some stylistic changes. Most notably, they introduced Material Design to the Chrome UI, and now, there's another facelift.

    I noticed the new looks in the freshly updated Chrome 69 in Kubuntu Beaver, and I wasn't too happy. The font is gray and pale, ergo contrast isn't as good as it should be, and the new round design feels odd. So I decided to change this back to the older style. Let me show you how you can do this.

    [...]

    There you go. If you don't like the aesthetically pleasing but ergonomically dubious change to the Chrome's UI look in version 69 onwards, then you can change (we don't know for how long) the layout back to what it was, or try one of the several available themes. The goal is to retain maximum visual clarity and efficiency. The old looks offer that. The new ones hamper that.

    I am quite alarmed by this trend. The only solace I get is the knowledge that a few Google shares in me possession are generating profit, which I shall use to heal my soul of all this sub-IQ100 touch-led destruction of the desktop and fast productivity, a crusade that started worldwide around 2011 or so.

  • Chrome 70 beta: shape detection, web authentication, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 70 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 70 is beta as of September 13, 2018.

  • Chrome 70 In Beta With TLS 1.3, Opus Support In MP4 & AV1 Decode

    Following last week's Chrome 69 release, Chrome 70 is now in beta as the latest feature-update to Google's browser.

The best Linux apps for Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Slowly but surely, Google is bringing support for Linux applications to Chrome OS. Even though the feature is primarily aimed at developers, like those who want to get Android Studio running on a Pixelbook, there are plenty of apps that can benefit normal users. We already have a guide about installing Linux apps on Chrome OS, but if you're not sure what to try, this post may point you in the right direction.

This isn't a simple compilation of the best Linux apps, because plenty of those exist already. Instead, the goal here is to recommend apps for tasks that cannot be adequately filled by web apps or Android applications. For example, serious photo editing isn't really possible through the web, and options on the Play Store are limited, but Gimp is perfect for it.

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Chrome 69 Released for Linux, Mac and Windows. Here's What's New.

Filed under
Google

Google Chrome team released latest installment of Chrome version 69 for Linux, Windows and Mac. Here are the updates.

Google Chrome completed 10 years this month and with the anniversary, Chrome team presented users with new changes, updates. It has been a decade when Chrome first version released and since then it has been quite a journey with incremental updates which leads to this day.

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10 Reasons to Buy Google Pixelbook Over a MacBook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

With a touchscreen display, cornered Gorilla glass, backlit keyboard, 4 in 1 design that enables a more convenient use, 7th Gen Intel Core processor, fast charging battery that lasts 10 hours, and a premium aluminium build, the Google Pixelbook is the slickest and thinnest Chromebook yet.

Just recently, I had the opportunity to purchase either the Google Pixelbook or a MacBook and I went for the Google Pixelbook.

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Latest on Chrome and Mozilla

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Google Wants to Kill the URL

     

    The focus right now, they say, is on identifying all the ways people use URLs to try to find an alternative that will enhance security and identity integrity on the web while also adding convenience for everyday tasks like sharing links on mobile devices.

  • Keybase: "Our browser extension subverts our encryption, but why should we care?"

    Two days ago I decided to take a look at Keybase. Keybase does crypto, is open source and offers security bug bounties for relevant findings — just the perfect investigation subject for me. It didn’t take long for me to realize that their browser extension is deeply flawed, so I reported the issue to them via their bug bounty program. The response was rather… remarkable. It can be summed up as: “Yes, we know. But why should we care?”

  • Daniel Stenberg: DoH in curl

    DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) is being designed (it is not an RFC quite yet but very soon!) to allow internet clients to get increased privacy and security for their name resolves. I've previously explained the DNS-over-HTTPS functionality within Firefox that ships in Firefox 62 and I did a presentation about DoH and its future in curl at curl up 2018.

    We are now introducing DoH support in curl. I hope this will not only allow users to start getting better privacy and security for their curl based internet transfers, but ideally this will also provide an additional debugging tool for DoH in other clients and servers.

    Let's take a look at how we plan to let applications enable this when using libcurl and how libcurl has to work with this internally to glue things together.

  • Firefox 63 Beta On Linux Finally Runs WebExtensions In Their Own Process

    With Firefox 62.0 having shipped, Mozilla promoted Firefox 63.0 to beta as part of their usual release cadence.

    With Firefox 63.0 there are several Windows 10 and macOS improvements including better multi-GPU handling on Macs, faster tab switching, and better Windows 10 integration. But for Linux users there is one notable platform-specific change and that is WebExtensions now running in their own process.

Chrome 69

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Google Chrome Update Brings A UI Revamp And New Password Manager With More Accurate Auto Filling

    Google Chrome is the go to browser for most people. With a simple UI and great performance, it has been the most dominant browser for quite sometime.

    Today Google dropped a big update for Chrome, on it’s 10th Birthday. There are a lot of changes, including a UI revamp, a new password manager and more.

  • Chrome 69 Brings UI Refinement, Initial AV1 Decoder, Picture-In-Picture API

    While Firefox is hitting version 62 this week, Google has introduced Chrome 69 as the newest version of their cross-platform web-browser that recently celebrated its tenth birthday.

    With this Chrome 69 browser update there is a visual refresh to the user-interface as Google developers adopted the Material 2 design principles for the desktop browser. Chrome 69 also has various security improvements, CSS conic gradients support, CSS scroll snap positions, and various other developer additions.

The Controversial Speck Encryption Code Will Indeed Be Dropped From The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

While Google got the NSA-developed Speck into the Linux kernel on the basis of wanting to use Speck for file-system encryption on very low-end Android (Go) devices, last month they decided to abandon those plans and instead work out a new "HPolyC" algorithm for use on these bottom-tier devices due to all the concerns over Speck potentially being back-doored by the US National Security Agency.

After Google reverted their plans to use Speck for file-system encryption, it was called for removal from the Linux kernel with no other serious users of this code... Speck had been added to the crypto code in Linux 4.17 and then to the fscrypt bits for file-system encryption with Linux 4.18.

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Security: Updates, NewEgg Breach, "Master Password" and CLIP OS

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • NewEgg cracked in breach, hosted card-stealing code within its own checkout

    The popular computer and electronics Web retailer NewEgg has apparently been hit by the same payment-data-stealing attackers who targeted TicketMaster UK and British Airways. The attackers, referred to by researchers as Magecart, managed to inject 15 lines of JavaScript into NewEgg's webstore checkout that forwarded credit card and other data to a server with a domain name that made it look like part of NewEgg's Web infrastructure. It appears that all Web transactions over the past month were affected by the breach.

  • "Master Password" Is A Password Manager Alternative That Doesn't Store Passwords
    Master Password is a different way of using passwords. Instead of the "know one password, save all others somewhere" way of managing passwords used by regular password managers, Master Password's approach is "know one password, generate all the others".
  • French cyber-security agency open-sources CLIP OS, a security hardened OS
    The National Cybersecurity Agency of France, also known as ANSSI (Agence Nationale de la Sécurité des Systèmes d'Information), has open-sourced CLIP OS, an in-house operating system its engineers had developed to address the needs of the French government administration. In a press release, ANSSI described CLIP OS as a "Linux-based operating system [that] incorporates a set of security mechanisms that give it a very high level of resistance to malicious code and allow it to protect sensitive information."

What Apps Can You Actually Run on Linux?

Most Linux distributions include Mozilla Firefox as the default web browser. Google also offers an official version of Google Chrome for Linux, and you can even get an “unbranded” open-source version of Chrome named Chromium. Pretty much everything inside your web browser should “just work” in Linux. Netflix now works normally in both Firefox and Chrome on Linux thanks to added support for its DRM. Adobe Flash has become less common on the web but is also available for Linux. It’s included with Chrome, just like on Windows, and you can install it separately for Firefox or Chromium. Linux doesn’t support some older browser plug-ins like Silverlight, but those are no longer widely used on the web. As the desktop PC world has shifted more and more to online, web-based software, Linux has become easier to use. If an application you want to run has a web version, you can use it on Linux. Read more

Games: The Misfits, Steam Client Beta, RAZED, Lamplight City, Din's Legacy, Mavericks

Nouveau and NVIDIA News

  • Nouveau Developers Begin Reverse-Engineering NVIDIA Turing Driver Support
    The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics cards are only officially beginning to ship today, but at least one independent Nouveau developer already has his hands on the hardware and beginning to work on the clean-room, driver reverse-engineering process in order to eventually get open-source "Nouveau" driver support working.
  • NVIDIA CUDA 10 Officially Released With Turing Support, nvJPEG, CUDA-Vulkan
    Coinciding with the debut of the GeForce RTX 2080 series line-up is now the official release of CUDA 10.0. CUDA 10.0.130 is now official after being announced back at SIGGRAPH. This NVIDIA compute architecture update provides Turing GPU support and its Tensor Cores, NVSwitch Fabric support, nvJPEG as a new library for JPEG processing, various performance tuning for its expansive library set, a new async task-graph programming model, interoperability improvements with Vulkan and D3D12, and new developer tools.
  • NVIDIA have released the 410.57 driver as well as a 396.54.06 Vulkan beta driver to help DXVK
    Along with the release of the GeForce RTX 2080 GPU series NVIDIA have put out a new 410.57 driver to support it. Additionally, there's a new Vulkan beta driver which should help DXVK.
  • Help Test Intel+Nvidia Hybrid Graphics GDM3 Fixes In Ubuntu 18.04
    Ubuntu 18.04 shipped with two issues for Intel+Nvidia hybrid graphics users: an increase in power consumption when the discrete GPU is off, and the inability to switch between power profiles with a simple logout (a restart is currently required). These issues are caused by changes in logind, Nvidia drivers packaging (which is now more granular), and the migration from LightDM to GDM3, and they were fixed in Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish.