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Google

Go 1.15 Release Notes

Filed under
Development
Google

The latest Go release, version 1.15, arrives six months after Go 1.14. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

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Also: Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations

The Massive Privacy Loopholes in School Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware

It’s back to school time and with so many school districts participating in distance learning, many if not most are relying on computers and technology more than ever before. Wealthier school districts are providing their students with laptops or tablets, but not all schools can afford to provide each student with a computer which means that this summer parents are scrambling to find a device for their child to use for school.

Geoffery Fowler wrote a guide in the Washington Post recently to aid parents in sourcing a computer or tablet for school. Given how rough kids can be with their things, many people are unlikely to give their child an expensive, premium laptop. The guide mostly focuses on incredibly low-cost, almost-disposable computers, so you won’t find a computer in the list that has what I consider a critical feature for privacy in the age of video conferencing: hardware kill switches. Often a guide like this would center on Chromebooks as Google has invested a lot of resources to get low-cost Chromebooks into schools yet I found Mr. Fowler’s guide particularly interesting because of his opinion on Chromebooks in education...

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Also: Enabling Dark Mode on a Chromebook (Do not try this at home)

Chromium/Chrome and GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
Google
Web

           

  • After a decade of Chromebooks, it’s time for Chrome OS to sort apps in the Launcher

    I can’t believe it’s 2020 and I’m saying this, but you still cannot sort applications of any kind on a Chromebook.

    When a new app is installed, the app shortcut simply gets added to the next available space in the Chrome OS Launcher and when that space is full, a new Launcher page is created with the next app shortcut appearing.

    [...]

    What has made this situation markedly worse over the past few years is the addition of both Android and Linux apps. At least for the latter, any Linux app installs made through Chrome OS get grouped in a folder called Linux Apps. That doesn’t happen with Progressive Web Apps or Android software.

    You can create your own app folders and manage apps yourself if you want, so that’s something. But one of the things I like about Chrome OS is that the operating system doesn’t get in your way. Meaning: it lets you focus on doing things, not managing things.

    So even a basic sort feature by type of app (Android, Chrome OS, Linux, and PWA) would a start. Alphabetical app sorting would be a nice option too.

  •        

  • 5 must-have terminal commands for Linux on your Chromebook

    We’ve spent a lot of time over the past week exploring what is possible on Chrome OS. Thanks to some updates to the Linux container, we’ve installed Windows 10 and a variety of Linux flavors. I love tinkering with Chrome OS to see how far I can push the maturing ecosystem but today, we’re going to focus on what the Linux container is currently designed to do. That, of course, it to run the Debian framework and allow users to install compatible Linux applications on Chrome OS. Doing so doesn’t require you to be a Linux guru and thank goodness for that. I’m still learning as I go but mastering the Chrome OS Linux terminal doesn’t have to be a terrifying or even daunting.

  • 11 Best Web Development Extensions for Chrome

    When developing a website, you have to make a checklist of many complex requirements. Whether dealing with color or font schemes, CSS layout problems, or website responsiveness on various devices, it is important to stay on top of any emerging issues. The following are some of the best web development extensions for Google Chrome (and other Chromium-based browsers).

Here’s the glaring potential flaw in Windows 10X devices as Chromebook competitors

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Imagine an operating system that’s focused on using the web browser and you can’t install traditional desktop apps on. No, I’m actually not talking about Chromebooks, and if I was, that would be an outdated thought experiment since you can install full desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS. I’m talking about upcoming devices running Microsoft Windows 10X, a “lite” software platform that is reportedly debuting in roughly 9 months.

You may not recall that Microsoft tried a similar approach in 2012 with Windows RT and the first Surface device.

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Also: Linux Marketshare Dipped in July – But Not By Much! [Ed: No, it is wrong to base one's assessment on a Microsoft partner that pretends Android, ChromeOS etc. don't even exist]

Chrome OS 84 tweaks Linux setup to include username and container sizing options

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

When Google introduced Chrome OS back in 2011, it was mostly just a window to the web. The operating system eventually expanded to include Android integration, and last year Google announced that every new Chromebook would be launching with Linux support. However, the implementation of Linux on Chrome OS had been a little limited out of the gate. Now with the launch of Chrome OS 84, Google is adding the ability to set a username and configure the Linux disk size during initial setup.

Previously, it was possible to adjust the size of the Linux container, but it required setting up a fresh installation. The Chrome OS team has been working on this change for several months now, and it's finally landing in the Stable channel. With this update, users will be able to resize the Linux container without having to remove it and re-do the installation.

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Also Google: Tested: Android's newest chip shows we probably don't need premium phones anymore

How to Enable the Hidden Screen Recorder in Android 10

Chrome and Firefox: Chrome 85 Beta, #StopHateForProfit in FB, Firefox 79 Credits and MDN Web Docs

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

  • Chrome 85: Upload Streaming, Human Interface Devices, Custom Properties with Inheritance and More

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 85 is beta as of July 23, 2020.

  • Chrome 85 Beta Brings WebHID API For Better Gamepad Support, AVIF Image Decode

    Following the recent Chrome 84 stable release, Google has now promoted Chrome 85 to beta as their latest feature update to this cross-platform web browser.

    Chrome 85 Beta brings initial fetch upload streaming capabilities, the WebHID API is taking shape to improve gamepad support within web browsers, a declarative shadow DOM API is now available as an origin trial, and auto-upgrading of images served over HTTP from HTTPS sites.

  • Use your voice to #StopHateForProfit

    Facebook is still a place where it’s too easy to find hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism and calls to violence.

    Today, we are standing alongside our partners in the #StopHateForProfit coalition and joining the global day of action to tell Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg: Enough is Enough.

  • Firefox 79 new contributors

    With the release of Firefox 79, we are pleased to welcome the 21 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 18 of whom were brand new volunteers!

  • MDN Web Docs: 15 years young

    On July 23, MDN Web Docs turned 15 years old. From humble beginnings, rising out of the ashes of Netscape DevEdge, MDN has grown to be one of the best-respected web platform documentation sites out there. Our popularity is growing, and new content and features arrive just about every day.

    When we turned 10, we had a similar celebration, talking about MDN Web Docs’ origins, history, and what we’d achieved up until then. Refer to MDN at ten if you want to go further back!

    In the last five years, we’ve broken much more ground. These days, we can boast roughly 15 million views per month, a comprehensive browser compatibility database, an active beginner’s learning community, editable interactive examples, and many other exciting features that didn’t exist in 2015. An anniversary to be proud of!

Open Usage Commons

Filed under
Google
  • Introducing the Open Usage Commons

    Open source maintainers don’t often spend time thinking about their project’s trademarks, and with good reason: between code contribution, documentation, crafting the technical direction, and creating a healthy contributor community, there’s plenty to do without spending time considering how your project’s name or logo will be used. But trademarks – whether a name, logo, or badge – are an extension of a project’s decision to be open source. Just as your project’s open source license demonstrates that your codebase is for free and fair use, an open source project trademark policy in keeping with the Open Source Definition gives everyone – upstream contributors and downstream consumers – comfort that they are using your project’s marks in a fair and accurate way.

  • Open Usage Commons Is Google-Backed Organization For Helping With Open-Source Project Trademarks

    Open Usage Commons is a new organization announced today that is backed by Google for helping open-source projects in managing their trademarks.

    Open Usage Commons was started by Google in conjunction with academia, independent contributors, and others for helping to assert and manage project identities through trademark management and conformance testing.

  • The "Open Usage Commons" launches

    Google has announced the creation of the Open Usage Commons, which is intended to help open-source projects manage their trademarks.

  • Announcing a new kind of open source organization

    Google has deep roots in open source. We're proud of our 20 years of contributions and community collaboration. The scale and tenure of Google’s open source participation has taught us what works well, what doesn’t, and where the corner cases are that challenge projects.

Canonical enables Linux desktop app support with Flutter

Filed under
Linux
Google
Ubuntu

Google’s goal for Flutter has always been to provide a portable framework for building beautiful UIs that run at native speeds no matter what platform you target. To validate this capability, we started by focusing on the mobile platforms, Android and iOS, where we’ve seen more than 80,000 fast, beautiful Flutter apps published to Google Play.

To build on this success, for more than a year we’ve been expanding our focus to include desktop-class experiences, both for the web and for the desktop OSes: macOS, Windows and Linux. This work includes extensive refactoring of the engine to support desktop-style mouse and keyboard input as well as resizable top-level windows. It also includes new UI capabilities that adapt well to desktop, like Material Density support and the NavigationRail and experiments with deep integration into the underlying desktop OS with experiments in Dart:FFI and access to the system menu bar and standard dialogs. All of this work was to ensure that in addition to being suitable for mobile-style experiences, Flutter is ready to handle full-featured, full-sized desktop apps.

It has long been our vision for Flutter to power platforms. We’ve seen this manifest already at Google with products like the Assistant so now we’re thrilled to see others harnessing Flutter to power more platforms. Today we are happy to jointly announce the availability of the Linux alpha for Flutter alongside Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, the world’s most popular desktop Linux distribution.

Read more

Also: Must Read: Google & Ubuntu Team Up to Bring Flutter Apps to Linux

Google's Flutter: Now developers can use it to build apps for Ubuntu Linux machines

Google and Canonical partner to bring Linux apps support to Flutter

Google and Canonical bring Flutter apps to Linux and the Snap Store

Whither Fuchsia? Will the new OS be Google's way to avoid sharing Linux code?

Filed under
OS
Linux
Google

If Google decides to use its new operating system Fuchsia will it lead to the company abandoning Linux - the kernel is used in Android - and lead to what one security professional is claiming will be "withdrawal of resources, investment, and Linux's largest userbase"? If this happens at the same time as the rise of Fuchsia is it certain it "will have a devastating effect"?

Read more

Intel-based Chromebooks and Games

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware
Gaming
  • Intel Compute Runtime Update Adds OpenCL + oneAPI Level Zero For DG1

    Intel's open-source Compute Runtime stack for providing OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero support for their graphics hardware has now rolled out support for the DG1 Xe discrete graphics card.

    Building off the DG1 support that has materialized for the Linux kernel and other components, most recently the IGC graphics compiler now supporting DG1, today's release of the Intel Compute Runtime has DG1 support in place.

  • Google testing native Steam client on Chromebooks powered by 10th generation Intel CPUs

    Chrome OS, Google’s other operating system to Android, has evolved very rapidly since the 2016 introduction of the Google Play Store, allowing Chromebooks to download and install Android apps. Google has since introduced support for running native Linux apps under the project name of Crostini. Crostini allows full desktop applications to run on Chromebooks and is based on the Debian Linux distribution. Running Android and Linux apps relies on Chrome OS’ ability to run containerized virtual machines, a means of allowing the core operating system to run different segmented virtual machines in an efficient and secure manner. That’s a fancy way of saying your Chromebook can have multiple personalities, and it’s the same technology underpinning how some Chromebooks will soon be able to run Windows apps. Today’s news is that the team at 9to5Google have identified a new special project in the Chromium open-source code called Borealis. Borealis is a Linux distribution based on popular Ubuntu, and comes complete with Steam already installed:

  • Steam on Chromebooks could be a game changer

    There have been continual developments in the realm of Linux on ChromeOS for some time. There early builds — Crostini — were based on Debian Linux.

    What is very different with the new version “Gerrit” versus the older Crostini builds is that it’s now Ubuntu based vs Debian. This is likely due to the previous iterations of Valve’s Steam for Linux running on Ubuntu.

  • Google could bring Steam gaming to Chromebooks (via Linux)

    Chrome OS is an operating system that was originally designed to support a single app – the Chrome web browser. But in recent years Google has brought support for Android apps and Linux apps to Chromebooks.

    So far that Linux support has come through a feature called Crostini, which is basically a virtual machine that runs Debian Linux in a way that lets you install and run Linux software without leaving Chrome OS.

    But 9to5Google was digging through the source code for Chromium OS (the open source version of Chrome OS) and discovered a new Linux virtual machine called Borealis, which uses Ubuntu rather than Debian. Borealis also includes a pre-installed version of Valve’s Steam game client for Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Norbert Preining: Switching from KDE/Plasma to Gnome3 for one week

Honestly, I can’t agree more. I have tried Gnome3 for over a year, again and again, and it feels like a block of concrete put onto the feet of dissidents by Italian mafia bosses. It drowns and kills you. Read more

KDE's 20.08 Apps Updates: New Features land in Dolphin, digiKam, KStars, Konsole and More

The updates to KDE apps released today are many, contain a wide array of changes, and cover an impressive number of applications. Dolphin, KDE's file explorer, for example, adds previews for more types of files and improvements to the way long names are summarized, allowing you to better see what each file is or does. Dolphin also improves the way you can reach files and directories on remote machines, making working from home a much smoother experience. It also remembers the location you were viewing the last time you closed it, making it easier to pick up from where you left off. Read more

Intel Graphics and oneAPI

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    This week Intel held their 2020 Architecture Day, albeit virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A lot of interesting technical information was shared on both the hardware and software sides. Here are some of the interesting highlights.

  • Intel Is Using IGC In Their Windows Drivers, Internal Prototype For Mesa

    At Intel's Architecture Day this week the company was talking about work on their new Windows graphics driver that is being timed for Xe but supporting existing generations of hardware as well. One of the interesting takeaways was seeing the Windows driver is now using the open-source "IGC" back-end.

  • Intel oneAPI 1.0 "Gold" Is Coming Later This Year

    Recently I wrote about it looking like oneAPI 1.0 was lining up and now there is further confirmation of the first production release of this Intel software collection indeed coming this year. After oneAPI was announced in late 2018 at Intel's Architecture Day, it was released in early form last year and the various software components making up this collection of interfaces to exploit the potential of Intel's diverse hardware offerings have continued to advance.

Laravel for Programming (New Series)

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  • Laravel – Eloquent “Has”, “With”, “WhereHas”

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  • Getting a 500 Internal Server Error on Laravel 5+ Ubuntu 14.04

    This is the first time I am installing Laravel on Ubuntu and I am already running into issues, 500 errors. I have done it before, numerous times on Windows OS and never had an issue. This 500 internal server usually happens when your “mod_rewrite” module is not turned on.

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  • 13 Best Laravel Helpers To Consider Using

    Laravel comes with a ton of useful global helper functions. If you haven’t used them so far, this is the best time to start. Over the years of me using the Laravel, 10 of those emerged as the most useful, making the development a lot easier. Sometimes we don’t really see how we can apply some methods until we see an example. So let’s get down to it and see the top 10 helpers I often use the most. These go for Laravel 5.*, however those on Laravel 6.* can bring these back using the following package https://github.com/laravel/helpers. You can also check out the official documentation for all laravel helper functions.

  • How to use Laravel with Socket.IO

    Websockets are cool. They are really helpful if you want to show real-time activities from your users (or perhaps some queue jobs). Now, if you are afraid of the word “Websockets”, don’t be. I will lay down the instructions on how you can use it and will be around to answer your questions if you need to. I had this challenge where I needed it to show a list of people who are currently viewing a specific URL in Laravel. So I started thinking. Part of me wanted to do a quick hack (luckily that’s not the strongest side of mine). Whilst the other wanted to build something cool, reusable and long-lasting.

  • Guide To Injecting Dependencies Into Controllers

    Laravel’s facades present a simple interface to the most useful classes in Laravel’s codebase. You can get information about the current request and user input, the session, caches, and much more. But if you prefer to inject your dependencies, or if you want to use a service that doesn’t have a facade, you’ll need to find some way to bring instances of these classes into your controller. All controller methods (including the constructors) are resolved out of Laravel’s container, which means anything you typehint that the container knows how to resolve will be automatically injected.

  • How to Upload Multiple Files via Ajax (VueJs and Laravel 5.5) - File Management

    When I first started using VueJs, it was a nightmare to find a decent tutorial on how to upload a single file using Ajax, let alone a tutorial explaining how to manage multiple files. I have been dealing a couple of years with file management, mostly using VueJs and Laravel, so I thought writing a tutorial like this could help a lot of developers implement one of the coolest things in applications, which is real-time asset management. First off, you will find many solutions online that are good but those who are early beginners will definitely struggle. What I will cover here is writing your frontend and backend code that will allow you to upload multiple files. Additionally, I will give you a few tricks on how to apply this stuff to different situations.