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Google

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

WWW: Chrome 61 Beta and WebAssembly Working Group

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 61 Beta: JavaScript modules, Payment Request API on desktop, Web Share API, and WebUSB

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 61 Beta Rolls Out With JavaScript Modules, WebUSB Support

    Google today is shipping the beta version of the upcoming Chrome 61 web-browser release.

    Highlights of Chrome 61 Beta include native support for JavaScript modules, Payment Request API support in the desktop browser, support for the Web Share API for easily sharing content on social networks, and initial WebUSB support.

  • Launching the WebAssembly Working Group

    For over two years the WebAssembly W3C Community Group has served as a forum for browser vendors and others to come together to develop an elegant and efficient compilation target for the Web. A first version is available in 4 browser engines and is on track to become a standard part of the Web. We’ve had several successful in-person CG meetings, while continuing our robust online collaboration on github. We also look forward to engaging the wider W3C community at the WebAssembly meeting at this year’s TPAC.

The 5 best Chromebooks for school or anywhere else in 2017

Filed under
Linux
Google

In 2014, Apple still had almost half of the school market, but Google had them in its sights. By 2016, according to FutureSource, a financial markets research company, Chromebooks had a 58 percent of the education market. Despite Apple and Microsoft's best efforts, Chromebooks are continuing to dominate schools.

Why? Part of it is price. You can get a good Chromebook for a few hundred dollars. Apple has nothing in its price range. Microsoft said it was competing with its new Surface Laptop and Windows 10S, but the price alone, $999, makes it a non-starter.

Read more

Events: Hacker Summer Camp, DebConf

Filed under
Google
Security
Debian

Browsers: Chrome/Chromium and Mozilla's Firefox, Send

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome/Chromium Turns On Support For OpenType Variable Fonts

    Google's Chrome/Chromium web-browser has now enabled support by default for OpenType Variable Fonts.

  • The latest challenge to Google's AI dominance comes from an unlikely place -- Firefox

    Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox internet browser, has begun testing a feature that lets you enter a search query using your voice instead of typing it in. The move could help Mozilla's efforts to make Firefox more competitive with Google Chrome.

    If you're using Firefox in English on Mac, Windows or Linux, you can turn on the experimental "Voice Fill" feature and then use it on Google, Yahoo and DuckDuckGo. Support for other websites will come later.

    Alphabet's Google offers speech recognition on its search engine when accessed through Chrome on desktop -- it became available in 2013 -- and Yahoo, Microsoft's Bing and Google all let you run search queries with your voice on mobile devices. But searching with your voice on Google while using Firefox on the desktop, for example, has historically been impossible. Now Mozilla wants to make its desktop browser more competitive.

  • Fedora 26 - Firefox Test Pilot send large files.

    This tool from Firefox team let you to send you upload and encrypt large files (up to 1GB) to share online.

Google Chrome 60 Released

Filed under
Google
Web

ASUS Launches Chromebook Flip C213 as Ultimate Future-Proof Education Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

ASUS, the Taiwanese computer and phone hardware and electronics company, announced the Chromebook Flip C213 as an ultimate future-proof education computer for IT in schools.

The ASUS Chromebook Flip C213 is designed from the group up for kids in elementary schools as it's built tough so that it can resist accidental drops and other impacts. To achieve this goal, ASUS has put a protective, military-grade rubber that uses reinforced nano-molding technology around the laptop's all four exterior edges and corners.

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Also:

‘Open Source Development at Google Is Both Very Diverse and Distributed’

Filed under
Google
Interviews
OSS

Open source development at Google is both very diverse and distributed. The larger projects that we release generally have dedicated teams developing and supporting the project, working with their external developer communities and providing internal support to other Googlers. Many of the smaller projects include just one or two engineers working on something experimental or just a fun, side project. While we do have a central Open Source Programs Office (the group I manage), it is relatively small compared to the size of the company. Instead, the actual development happens throughout the company, with hundreds of teams and thousands of engineers, tech writers, designers and product managers contributing to open source in some way.

Read more

Many Microsoft Layoffs After Microsoft Caused Android/Linux Trouble in Europe

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Microsoft plans to cut 'thousands' of jobs: source

    Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) plans to cut "thousands" of jobs, with a majority of them outside the United States, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

    Reuters reported on Monday that Microsoft would undergo a reorganization that would impact its sales and marketing teams as the company doubles down on its fast-growing cloud business.

  • Exclusive: EU Considers Record Fine as Panel Checks Google Android Case-Sources [Ed: Microsoft initiated this, using all sorts of proxies several years back]

    EU antitrust regulators are weighing another record fine against Google over its Android mobile operating system and have set up a panel of experts to give a second opinion on the case, two people familiar with the matter said.

Why Microsoft (And Even Apple) Are Threatened By Google Chromebooks’ Popularity

Filed under
Linux
Google

Summary

Chromebooks easily surpassed Windows and Mac OS computers in the U.S. K-12 education market.

Alphabet’s cakewalk victory in the education market forced Microsoft to invent the walled-garden Windows 10 S. Apple now offers discounts to make its iPad more attractive to K-12 education customers.

Microsoft and Apple know that letting Google dominate the K-12 education is dangerous. The kids of today are tomorrow’s corporate workers and movers.

Instead of kids getting trained on Windows and Microsoft Office, a larger part of the U.S. K-12 education system is now being indoctrinated with Chrome OS, Android Apps, and Google Docs.

The Windows 10 S initiative is Microsoft trying to insure that its operating system and productivity software are not rendered irrelevant in the future.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more