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Google

Review: Google Pixel is Android at its best (if a little boring)

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Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel’s designs have been divisive ever since the first batch of leaks hit the interwebs, but I’ve grown quite fond of it. Maybe it’s the fact that my ‘Really Blue’ (provided to us by Verizon, thanks folks) model is in fact so incredibly blue, but really I just think the two tone look stands out. It’s instantly recognizable if you’ve seen the phone before.

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Google's Upspin Debuts

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Google
OSS
  • Another option for file sharing

    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.

  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files

    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.

  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub

    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share.

    Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.

  • Google devs try to create new global namespace

    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like?

    The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

Go 1.8 Release Notes

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.8 Release Notes

    The latest Go release, version 1.8, arrives six months after Go 1.7. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. There are two minor changes to the language specification. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes.

    Go 1.8 has a few new 64-bit x86 instructions supported, Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.7 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86) and that should yield a 20~30% performance improvement for 32-bit ARM systems. But even x86 64-bit systems should see 0~10% performance improvements with Go 1.8.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Google

Chromebooks are Spreading Out in the Educational Market

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GNU
Linux
Google

In recent months, several prominent analysts have taken aim at media reports that have allegedly miscast how well Chromebooks--portable computers based on Google's Chrome OS platform--are doing in sales terms. "There has been a ton of misreporting as many lazy reporters and bloggers have characterized this as all sales, which it wasn't, or even consumer sales, which it most assuredly was not," Stephen Baker of the NPD Group, has told Computerworld, for example.

Chromebooks are actually a fast growing part of the portable computer market, though, and Chrome OS has become an entrenched operating system. Particularly in schools, these systems are making a difference, and now Asus and Acer are out with new models focused on the educational market.

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Remix OS: Is This the Droid You Were Looking For?

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GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Android on your PC but there weren’t any really usable projects? Now you can. Remix OS is an Android based operating system that’s designed to offer a full-fledged desktop PC-like experience. The developers have done a lot of work to implement many desktop-centric features such as multi-window multi-tasking. It offers a very familiar interface inspired by Windows, so the learning curve is not that steep. If you have used Android before, you will find yourself at home.

Remix OS is being developed by Jide Technologies, a company founded by three ex-Googlers, “with a mission to unlock the potential of Android in order to accelerate a new age of computing,” reads the “about us” page.

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FOSS From Google

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Google
OSS

Google will open-source its Earth Enterprise on-premises software in March

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Google
OSS

Google today announced that in March it will open-source its Google Earth Enterprise software, which lets organizations deploy Google Maps and Google Earth on their on-premises data center infrastructure.

Google unveiled the software back in 2006 and stopped selling it nearly two years ago. Since then Google has released updates and provided support to organizations with existing licenses. Once it pops up online — on GitHub, under an Apache 2.0 license — organizations will be free to collaboratively or independently modify it for their own needs as open-source software.

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Chrome 56

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 56 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux, full HTML5 by Default & ‘Not Secure’ label rollout

    Chrome 56 is rolling out now to Mac, Windows, and Linux with a number of features and security fixes. Beginning as a staged rollout in the previous version, HTML5 by Default is now enabled for all users. Additionally, all sensitive HTTP sites will be marked as unsecure in the address bar.

    With last month’s release, Chrome only defaulted to HTML5 for a small subset of users. Now, it is enabled by default, with the first visit to webpages prompting users about Flash usage. This deprecation of the Adobe plug-in should lead to a better and safer web browsing experience.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 56 to Stable with HTML5 by Default, 51 Security Fixes

    Google promoted today its Chrome 56 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, which comes about 55 days after Chrome 55 was released.

  • Google Chrome Now Defaults to HTML5 for All

    With the version 56 update, Google has enabled Chrome to default to HTML5-based rendering for better speed and security. This means that content still using Flash won’t display immediately and instead will require your manual authorization to run.

  • Chrome 56 Released With WebGL 2.0 By Default, FLAC Support

    Chrome 56 ships with HTML5 by default, WebGL 2.0 by default, sensitive pages (including those with password boxes) loaded over HTTP are now marked as insecure, support for FLAC audio is enabled by default (similar to the recent Firefox release), improves performance of the browser by throttling web-pages in background tabs, and a variety of other enhancements.

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS tablets with Android apps are coming soon

    Get ready for Chrome OS to get a lot more pervasive and a lot more interesting this year, if only because it’s going to show up in new kinds of hardware. Google has been talking up the latest round of Chromebooks — the Samsung Chromebook Pro from CES and today’s new education-focused Chromebooks — but it’s also looking ahead to the next thing: tablets.

    Google’s Rajen Sheth, director of product for Android and Chrome for education and enterprise, held a conference call yesterday to talk about Chromebooks for the education market. But he also couldn’t help but note that these 2-in-1 form factors are just the start for Chrome OS.

  • Android apps will make Chromebooks worth buying this year

    While Chromebooks have always been a great low-cost option for basic tasks like browsing and watching videos, they’re about to get a lot more useful, as Google is introducing support for Android apps on them this year.

    The company announced that it was working to bring its massive Google Play app store to Chromebooks in May 2016, and rolled out a preview on Chrome OS for three models last September. Now, it’s confirmed that all new Chromebooks launching in 2017 and from here on out will support Android apps, along with a long list of existing devices.

  • Endless Code and Mission Hardware Demo

    Recently, I have had the pleasure of working with a fantastic company called Endless who are building a range of computers and a Linux-based operating system called Endless OS.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.