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Google

Google wants its very own Net

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Google

It seems Google is lusting for its own personal and private global internet. If it manages this, forget DRM. It'll have the ultimate in consumer control.

Google Confirms Using Ubuntu, Denies Distribution Plans

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Google

Google Inc. on Tuesday confirmed that it is using Ubuntu desktop Linux technology internally, "but have no plans to distribute it outside of the company."

Google? Linux? Goobuntu? Boulderdash!

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Google

According to reports, there will be a "Ubuntu desktop Linux distribution, based on Debian and the Gnome desktop, it is known internally as 'Goobuntu.'" King goes on to state, "Google has confirmed it is working on a desktop linux project."

I wish I could buy this report, but I can't.

50 gmail invites?

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Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: openSUSE, LibreOffice, Curl and GNOME SCaLE 18x

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 96

    While many activities around the world slow down due to the COVID-19 crisis, we are proud to say the YaST development keeps going at full speed. To prove that, we bring you another report about what the YaST Team has been working on during the last couple of weeks. The releases of openSUSE Leap 15.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 are approaching. That implies we invest quite some time fixing bugs found by the testers.

  • Indonesian LibreOffice community: Online translation marathon

    Communities around the world help to translate and localise LibreOffice in over 100 languages. We really appreciate their efforts!

  • Update on openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference had a meeting this week to discuss various topics surrounding COVID19 and how it may affect the conference and planning for it. At this point, it is uncertain what restrictions governments may keep in place in the coming months. While October is some months away, there are many aspects we are considering as to how to run the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference. Travel restrictions, flights, hotel and venue availability, event capacity and our community members’ ability to attend the conference are all factors we are considering. We hope to make a decision about the conference at the latest by mid-June.

  • Daniel Stenberg: The curl roadmap 2020 video

    On March 26th 2020, I did a live webinar where I talked about my roadmap visions of what to work on in curl during 2020.

  • Molly de Blanc: SCaLE 18x

    The GNOME presence was felt throughout the conference with a special GNOME Beers and pre-release party on the first day of the conference, Thursday, March 5th. GNOME information flyers were also included inside every attendee bag. This presence carried on to our booth where we were able to connect with GNOME community members, contributors, and enthusiasts as well as tote our merchandise, including a brand new GNOME t-shirt, and stickers. Thank you to the number of supporters who assisted us at the booth including Foundation staff, Melissa Wu, Caroline Henriksen, Neil McGovern, and Rosanna Yuen, along with Foundation members Matthias Clasen, Sriram Ramkrishna, and Nuritzi Sanchez.

Ubuntu 20.04 Beta is Now Available to Download

Landing in advance of next month’s stable release, the Ubuntu 20.04 beta gives enthusiasts and testers the chance to get up close with the various changes on offer. Such as? Well, Ubuntu 20.04 beta ships the Linux 5.4 kernel; offers the majority of the recent GNOME 3.36 release, including its new lock screen; and adds a new ‘dark mode’ setting to the Appearance section. Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • What’s new with tzdata: The time zone database for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    The Time Zone Database (tzdata) provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) with data that is specific to the local time zone. Applications in the Linux operating system use this data for various purposes. For instance, the GNU C Library (glibc) uses tzdata to ensure APIs such as strftime() work correctly, while applications such as /usr/bin/date use it to print the local date. The tzdata package contains data files documenting both current and historic transitions for various time zones around the world. This data represents changes required by local government bodies or by time zone boundary changes, as well as changes to coordinated universal time (UTC) offsets and daylight saving time (DST).

  • JetBrains IntelliJ Red Hat OpenShift extension provides debug support for OpenShift components

    The 0.2.0 release version of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for JetBrains IntelliJ is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the JetBrains Plugins Repository. This release provides a new OpenShift: Debug action to simplify the debugging of OpenShift Components pushed to a cluster. It is similar to features developed for Visual Studio Code and JBoss Tools for Eclipse. OpenShift Connector uses OpenShift Do‘s (odo‘s) debug command under the hood and supports only local Java and Node.js components. This enhancement lets the user write and debug local code without leaving IntelliJ.

  • IBM awards its second $50,000 Open Source Community Grant to internship and mentorship program Outreachy

    Last October, the open source community at IBM awarded a first-of-its-kind quarterly grant to promote nonprofits that are dedicated to education, inclusiveness, and skill-building for women, underrepresented minorities, and underserved communities in the open source world. Our Open Source Community Grant identifies and rewards future developers and open source leaders and creates new tech opportunities for underrepresented communities. Today, we are pleased to announce that the winner of the second quarterly Open Source Community Grant is Outreachy. Our open source community nominated a number of nonprofits doing incredible work and, while voting was close with plenty of deserving organizations in the mix, we awarded Outreachy the most votes for their commitment to providing paid internships to underserved and underrepresented minorities. The award is timely as it will help Outreachy provide paid remote work to underrepresented groups in a time when people are being forced to work from home because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Inches Closer to GA

    Red Hat recently updated its OpenShift Serverless platform with a handful of new features that inch it closer to general availability (GA). The move highlights both the ongoing maturation of serverless platforms as well as the tepid pace of that maturation process. Red Hat’s OpenShift Serverless product is based on the Knative project. It boasts many of the benefits tied to serverless platforms like the ability to scale up or down to zero, which theoretically allows for lower operational costs. And OpenShift is Red Hat’s Kubernetes-focused enterprise platform. The update uses the Knative 0.12 iterations of serving, eventing, and the Knative command line interface (CLI). That’s just a few steps behind the most recent Knative releases that are part of the project’s rapid-fire release cycle. It also includes a handful of other integrations designed to ease use and integration.

  • Red Hat: We need to talk about cloud-native

    As they edge towards a 5G architecture, can the network operator community build on key takeaways from their early virtualization efforts? Susan James, senior director of telecommunications strategy at Red Hat, sure as hell hopes so. "The telcos need to look at what has been learned from the NFV years," says James, adding pointedly, "there's no point in just dumping applications into containers." And that could be the temptation as the telecom sector starts to embrace the cloud-native aspects of 5G and all that encompasses, from new ways of building, onboarding, integrating, managing, exposing and supporting applications, whether developed in-house or sourced from third-party developers. Telcos have been talking about cloud-native for a few years, since they realized that somewhat monolithic virtualized network functions (VNFs) running on early NFV infrastructure platforms would only get them a smidge of the agility and flexibility they seek. Instead, a wide-area-network-friendly, carrier-grade version of the containerized systems increasingly popular with large enterprises and the data center brigade looks far better suited for the challenges that full-blown 5G (with its gazillions of potentially latency-intolerant devices connected to edge platforms) will bring. Now those conversations about containers, Kubernetes and next-generation telco cloud functionality are getting more frequent, says James, who has been with Red Hat – one of the leading providers of open source software systems for telco cloud deployments, such as its version of OpenStack and its OpenShift container platform – for almost two years, following more than 15 years at Ericsson.

  • Let’s monitor edge computing networks with RHEL!

    One of the characteristics of edge computing is that rather than one big network, multiple smaller networks are being used. Network connectivity inside of these smaller networks is mostly reliable, but the connectivity between these network bubbles can be unstable—some edge network concepts are even designed to cope with temporary network interruptions between these networks.

  • Ansible streaming video series, open source security tools, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

Elisa Music Player by KDE is Refreshing, But Not There Just Yet

If you’re someone who still listens to locally stored music, in this day and age of several streaming music services, you deserve a good music player app. I use Google Play Music because it also lets me upload my local music files. Yet, I can never really fully switch over because I just don’t like the silly-looking interface. Google Play Music just has the worst interface of all music streaming services. Thus, I still prefer using a nice, beautiful local music player app more often when I can. As such, I’m always on the lookout. Elisa Music Player was just released by the KDE team and is kind of available for every Windows, openSUSE, and Arch Linux user. Read more