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Gorgeous Cub Linux 1.0 (Chromixium OS) Release Candidate Now Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Cub Linux (previously Chromixium OS) developers have just announced on their Twitter account that the RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming 1.0 version of the operating system is available for download.

Before we tell you what goodies have been shipped with the first Release Candidate builds of Cub Linux 1.0, we would like to remind those of you who are not in the loop that, earlier this year, the team announced the rename of the project to Cub Linux from Chromixium OS at the request of Google’s Trademark Enforcement Team.

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Google Updates Android for Linux Kernel Flaw

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Facing multiple Android security challenges in March so far, Google is issuing an unprecedented mid-month emergency patch update. The emergency patch is not, however, related to reports of a new Stagefright flaw but, rather, is a known Linux kernel vulnerability that Google was scheduled to fix.

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Maglev

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Jump aboard our load balancing Maglev, Google tells devs

    Google will open-source its super-duper load balancing Maglev tool to developers – a move that will also bolster its own infrastructure developments.

    In a blog post Google said it has a history of building its own networking gear, "and perhaps unsurprisingly, we build our own network load balancers as well, which have been handling most of the traffic to Google services since 2008."

  • Google Shares Details of Its Software-Defined Load Balancer

    The Maglev software-defined load balancer, which runs on commodity Linux servers, has been critical to Google Cloud Platform for eight years, company says.

    As it's already done with other areas of its massive datacenter infrastructure, Google this week gave enterprises a peek at Maglev, the software-defined network load balancer the company has been using since 2008 to handle traffic to Google services.

    Maglev, like most of Google's networking systems, was built internally. But unlike Jupiter, the custom network fabric connecting Google's data centers, Maglev runs on commodity Linux servers and does not require any specialized rack deployment, Google said in a blog post describing the technology.

Chromebook/Google/Gentoo Security

Filed under
Gentoo
Google
Security
  • Google has doubled its bounty for a Chromebook hack to $100,000

    Google doubled the bounty it will pay for a successful exploit of its Chromebook laptop to $100,000, sweetening the pot in hopes of drawing more attention from security researchers.

    The larger reward is intended for someone who finds a persistent compromise of a Chromebook in guest mode, according to Google's security blog on Monday.

  • Google's Bug Bounty for a Chromebook Hack Rises to $100,000

    We've reported a few times on bug bounties--cash prizes offered by open source communities to anyone who finds key software bugs--ranging from bounties offered by Google (for the Chrome browser) and Mozilla. This open method of discovering security vulnerabilities has been embraced at Google, especially. In fact, Google has offered up as much as $1 million to people who identify key vulnerabilities in the Chrome browser.

Google’s smartwatch king has a 50-year vision for the future of Android Wear

Filed under
Android
Google

It was Android head Hiroshi Lockheimer who kickstarted the Android Wear properly. Singleton, who is British, had been working at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, when "Hiroshi was actually thinking we should get a project started on watches and asked me to come back to the mobile team to work on Android Wear."

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Google Patches Android for Stagefright in March Update

Filed under
Android
Google
Security

Among the related libraries is the core Android mediaserver, which Google is patching this month for six different vulnerabilities. Two of the issues (CVE-2016-0815 and CVE-2016-0816) are identified as critical vulnerabilities in mediaserver that could lead to a potential remote-code execution.

Another two issues (CVE-2016-0826 and CVE-2016-0827) are privilege escalation vulnerabilities in Android that Google rates as high-severity issues. Google has identified two more high-severity issues (CVE-2016-0828 and CVE-2016-0829) in mediaserver as information-disclosure vulnerabilities.

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5 Free Alternatives To Google Drive On Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google Drive is one of the most popular, fremium cloud storage service from Google. Gdrive is an official client for Google drive and a must have application for Windows. But sadly the most popular service can't be used on Linux via any official client like Gdrive. So I thought to find free alternatives to Google Drive on Linux and I came up with the list of 5 free cloud storage services that provide client for Linux. I know you'll love it.

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How to turn your old PC into a speedy Chromebook for free

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

One of the great ironies of the cloud computing age is that the five to ten year old laptop gathering dust in your desk drawer probably has more horsepower than a top of the line Chromebook which just hit the market. That means you can take a long dormant unit out of retirement and it will typically run quite quickly when paired with a lightweight operating system like Chrome.

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ReactOS News

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
OSS
  • ReactOS Participation in Google Summer of Code 2016
  • ReactOS: Building a Free-Licensed Windows

    From dual-booting to WINE, free software has always struggled to provide a solution for running Windows applications. However, few of these efforts have been more ambitious than ReactOS, a free-licensed implementation of Windows. The project has been at work since 2006 and, in February 2016, ReactOS finally released its first alpha version, after a decade of difficult and necessarily cautious development.

  • ReactOS Gains Btrfs File-System Support

    ReactOS, the project aiming for binary compatibility with Microsoft Windows (Server 2003), now has Btrfs file-system support.

    While there's just a primitive Btrfs driver for Windows, ReactOS has already gained native Btrfs file-system support.

Google Gives iOS Devs Open Source EarlGrey Testing Tool

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google last week introduced EarlGrey, a functional user interface testing framework for Apple iOS apps.

YouTube, Google Calendar, Google Photos, Google Translate and Google Play Music have successfully adopted the framework, the company said.

EarlGrey has been open sourced under the Apache license, according to Google's Siddartha Janga. The company has provided app developers with a start guide and the ability to add EarlGrey to their projects using CocoaPods or to add it manually to Xcode project files.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud