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Raspberry Pi now officially supports Google's TensorFlow software

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Linux
Google

Since its launch in 2015, the software firm has had a goal to be "an open source machine learning framework for everyone". But to do that, it has needed to run on as many of the platforms that people are using as possible.

"We've long supported Linux, MacOS, Windows, iOS, and Android, but despite the heroic efforts of many contributors, running TensorFlow on a Raspberry Pi has involved a lot of work," the company's software engineer, Pete Warden, said in a blog post on Medium.

However, thanks to a recent collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, it announced that the latest 1.9 release of TensorFlow can be installed from pre-built binaries using Python's pip package system.

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How Google decides to open source its technology

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Google
OSS

Google has a solid reputation as an engineering organisation with an open source culture, with Googlers contributing a huge amount of code back to the community and projects like TensorFlow and Kubernetes making a mainstream impact.

Speaking to the press during the Google Cloud Next event in San Francisco last week, Sarah Novotny, head of open source strategy at Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Melody Meckfessel, VP of engineering for GCP, spoke candidly about how the company decides to open source its technology and building an open culture.

"Google has a long history of engaging in open source communities," Novotny started out by saying. "We've had an open source programs office for more than 12 years and have worked with several other large companies to come into this space in a way that protects both the company and the projects and the culture of the projects."

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Chromebook Marketing Badmouths Windows, MacOS

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Linux Apps may come to Chromebooks in Stable Channel In Version 69

Filed under
Linux
Google

We were originally hoping that Chrome OS version 68 would get Linux App support, but that wasn’t the case. Now, Chrome 69 is said to be released for the 4th September this year. (Not too long left to go) and the update has a strong chance to hit Google’s very own Chromebook first instead of the other Chromebook. This information is gleaned from several commits that suggest a review of the Crostini project will now finalise.

Without the upcoming update, Linux app support is already available on a fair amount of Chrome OS laptops that are running the Dev Channel version of the Chrome OS. The fair amount of Chrome OS laptops, which includes Google’s own Pixelbook and HP’s Chromebook x2, can potentially run Linux Apps. But, as many of these laptops are not high specification machines, they might (will) struggle to adequately run Linux Apps.

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OS Turf Wars

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Build your own Chrome/Linux operating system with Chromium OS and Crostini

    Google is slowly starting to add support for running Linux applications on Chromebooks. But as I discovered when I tested Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 recently, it’s still a work in progress. The feature also isn’t available for all Chrome OS computers yet.

    That could change in the not-too-distant future. Right now you need to be running Chrome OS in the developer channel in order to enable Linux app support. There are signs that Linux app support could hit the Chrome OS beta channel this week, and it could graduate to the stable channel by the time Chrome OS 69 is released later this year.

  • Germans swing another putsch against Linux [Ed: This isn't a technical decision. It cannot be technical. I reckon some politicians/suits had too many dinners with Microsoft and maybe bribes too (like the Munich saga)]

    As initially reported by Heise, the state's tax authority has 13,000 workstations running OpenSuse -- which it adopted in 2006 in a well-received migration from Solaris -- that it now wants to migrate to a "current version" of Windows, presumably Windows 10.

  • With DaaS Windows coming, say goodbye to your PC as you know it

    Now Microsoft, which helped lead that revolution, is trying to return us to that old, centralized control model.

    Forget that noise. If Microsoft continues on this course, soon your only real choices if you really want a “desktop” operating system will be Linux and macOS. Oh, you’ll still have “Windows.” But Windows as your “personal” desktop? It will be history.

Google: The Data Transfer Project, Fuchsia, Cirq, Chrome 69

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Google
  • The Data Transfer Project and the Hammer

    Got that? There are actually two conversions each time data passes back or forth: first from the proprietary API of Company A into the Data Model for that type of information, and then from the Data Model to the proprietary API of Company B. With the standards approach, Company A simply sends its data to Company B directly without the need for conversion even once, because both companies create and store data using the same format.

     

    Stated another way, using adapters is a band aid approach that allows proprietary vendors to continue to use proprietary technology to silo your data, while providing just enough mobility to users to permit them to tolerate the continuation of life as we know it and compliance with evolving regulations, such as the GDPR.

     

    In short, using an open source hammer treats the user as a nail. Using open standards would turn the user into a hammer, empowering her to use whatever vendor she wishes, and putting the maximum incentive on all vendors to compete on services, features and performance to earn the user’s continued business.

     

    I think we can all agree that users would rather be the hammer. We’ve all been the nail for far too long, and all it’s given us is headaches.

     

  • What is Fuchsia, and why should you care?

    But an operating system needs more than a name. And without Google telling us anything about its new project, we're left to piece together all the breadcrumbs the internet can find. Here is what we know so far.

  • Google Cirq: a Python Open Source Library for Quantum Computing

    Cirq aims to make it easier to write, manipulate, and optimize quantum algorithms for noisy intermediate scale quantum (NISQ) computers. Cirq also enables the execution of those programs on a local simulator and is designed to support future quantum hardware and quantum cloud processors.

    Noisy intermediate scale quantum computers will be the first quantum computers that will become available in the near future and that have been announced by several companies, including Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel, and others. Comprised of 50–100 qubits, NISQ computers aim to allows researchers to demonstrate quantum supremacy, although their usefulness will be limited by quantum gates noise and thus by the efficiency of error correction algorithms that will be designed.

  • Linux Apps on Chromebooks Could Hit Stable In Chrome 69

    It’s been a bit since we’ve talked about Linux apps on Chromebooks, but that doesn’t mean development has stopped. Actually, progress has been constantly moving forward with small tweaks and changes happening almost daily. The big changes, however, haven’t been as rapid-fire since I/O back in May, so news surrounding the Crostini project has been a bit quieter overall.

Google moves AndroidX to the Android Open Source Project

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS

Google is attempting to provide more transparency to developers by moving AndroidX, which was previously called the Android Support Library, to the public Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This move means that primary feature development and bug fixes will be completed in the open and changes will be visible.

AndroidX originally started off as a small set of libraries wtih the intent to provide backwards compatibility for new Android platform APIs, and as a result, its development was strictly tied to the platform. All work was done in internal Google branches and then pushed to the AOSP.

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Chromebooks/Chromecast Programs

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Google
  • The Best Photo Editors for Chromebooks

    One of the biggest question we see about Chromebooks is “can they run Photoshop?” The answer to that is no—at least not the full version you’ll find on other platforms. But that doesn’t mean they can’t do photo editing.

    And that’s really the key here: knowing when you need Photoshop versus when you just need something to edit photos. There are some powerful tools available for Chromebooks—perhaps not quite as powerful as Photoshop, but they can get pretty dang close for most uses.

  • How To Connect Your Chromecast To VLC?

Google 'Cloudwashing' (Other Buzzwords Also) and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
Google

Google Promotes 'Security' and Lock-in

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Google
  • The Key to Trust

    As the principal inventor behind both the Security Key and U2F protocol, we are true supporters of open standards. To realize our mission of making secure login ubiquitous, we designed the original Security Key, and provided the majority of the open source code and test tools for FIDO U2F and the latest version of the standard, FIDO2, which offers a passwordless experience.

  • Google takes on Yubico and builds its own hardware security keys

    Google today announced it is launching its own hardware security keys for two-factor authentication. These so-called Titan Security Keys will go up against similar keys from companies like Yubico, which Google has long championed as the de facto standard for hardware-based two-factor authentication for Gmail and other services.

  • Google Launches ‘Titan Security Key’ To Boost Your Online Security

    Google has launched the public version of the security key used to protect its 85,000 employees from phishing and other cyber attacks during internal testing. Named Titan, it falls under the category of physical security keys that are known to provide better protection than other forms of 2-step verification including OTPs.

  • Connect Google Cloud Identity with Linux® [Ed: Anything “aaS” means surveillance]

    Unfortunately, Google’s view of their IDaaS platform doesn’t include systems operating outside of GCP. So, with respect to this blog post, the concept of connecting Google Cloud Identity with Linux machines hosted at AWS, Azure, on-prem, or anywhere else that is outside of Google’s ecosystem simply doesn’t work with Google Cloud Identity alone.

  • Cloud Services Platform: bringing the best of the cloud to you
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A Quick Test Of NVIDIA's "Carmel" CPU Performance

NVIDIA's Tegra Xavier SoC is becoming more widely available now that the Jetson Xavier Development Kit has begun shipping. Besides this latest SoC being an exciting design with its Volta-based GPU and having a Tensor Processing Unit / Deep Learning Accelerator, it's exciting on the CPU side as well with NVIDIA's custom-designed ARMv8 "Carmel" CPU cores. The Tegra194 (Xavier) SoC features eight 10-wide superscalar Carmel CPU cores that are based on the ARMv8.2-A architecture and manufactured on a TSMC 12nm FinFET process. Read more

Events: XDC 2018 Kicks Off Tomorrow In A Coruña, Linux Foundation Upcoming Events

  • XDC 2018 Kicks Off Tomorrow In A Coruña
    Tomorrow marks the start of the annual X.Org Developers' Conference that is not only about the X11 server but also Mesa, Wayland, Linux input, and other areas of the desktop stack. It's set to be another interesting XDC with talks about Vulkan in Mesa, multi-GPU device selection in OpenGL, Virtual KMS, DRM GPU scheduler, continuous integration, the new Intel Iris Gallium3D driver, the state of ARB_gl_spirv for Mesa, OpenCL support via NIR/SPIR-V. HMM, and more.
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More Malware-Like Behaviour From Chrome and Firefox Introduces Firefox Monitor, Other News

  • Now Chrome Doesn’t Delete “Google Cookies” Even If You Clear All Cookies
    Yet another privacy concern for Google Chrome users! Previously, we talked about Google’s auto-login mechanism which is hijacking our local Google Chrome data. Now, another Chrome 69 setting has come to light which is risking our freedom to remove data.
  • Introducing Firefox Monitor, Helping People Take Control After a Data Breach
    Data breaches, when information like your username and password are stolen from a website you use, are an unfortunate part of life on the internet today. It can be hard to keep track of when your information has been stolen, so we’re going to help by launching Firefox Monitor, a free service that notifies people when they’ve been part of a data breach. After testing this summer, the results and positive attention gave us the confidence we needed to know this was a feature we wanted to give to all of our users.
  • Firefox Monitor, take control of your data
    That sinking feeling. You’re reading the news and you learn about a data breach. Hackers have stolen names, addresses, passwords, survey responses from a service that you use. It seems like we’re having that sinking feeling more and more. But we don’t have to despair. While technology will never be impervious to attacks, we can make sure that we’re able to respond when we learn that our personal data and passwords are part of a breach.
  • Firefox Quantum, Beta and Nightly Affected by ‘Reap Firefox’ Crash Attack
    A particular vulnerability in the present Firefox browser has been unraveled by the security researcher and basically the creater of this bug, Sabri Haddouche in his blog post. He pointed towards a bug which brings the browser and also the operating system possibly with a ‘Reap Firefox’ attack crash. This vulnerability affects Firefox versions working under Linux, macOS and Windows.
  • $1.6 Million to Connect Unconnected Americans: Our NSF-WINS Grand Prize Winners
    After months of prototyping and judging, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are fueling the best and brightest ideas for bringing more Americans online Today, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation (NSF) are announcing the grand prize winners in our Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (NSF-WINS) Challenges — an audacious competition to connect millions of unconnected Americans. The grand prize winners are as novel as they are promising: An 80-foot tower in rural Appalachia that beams broadband connectivity to residents. And, an autonomous network that fits in two suitcases — and can be deployed after earthquakes and hurricanes.

Endless OS – A Beautifully Unique Linux Distribution for Your Family

Endless OS is a free Linux-based Operating System that makes computers fun to use. It features a beautiful UI, a somewhat locked-down app manager, and tons of educational software. Endless OS is mostly used to teach computing all over the world so the company has made it simulate a smartphone experience. In place of an app drawer, it uses shortcuts arranged in a grid view on the desktop. Sort of like an iPhone. You can add/delete apps from view as well as create folders for organizing them. Read more