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Google

‘Open Source Development at Google Is Both Very Diverse and Distributed’

Filed under
Google
Interviews
OSS

Open source development at Google is both very diverse and distributed. The larger projects that we release generally have dedicated teams developing and supporting the project, working with their external developer communities and providing internal support to other Googlers. Many of the smaller projects include just one or two engineers working on something experimental or just a fun, side project. While we do have a central Open Source Programs Office (the group I manage), it is relatively small compared to the size of the company. Instead, the actual development happens throughout the company, with hundreds of teams and thousands of engineers, tech writers, designers and product managers contributing to open source in some way.

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Many Microsoft Layoffs After Microsoft Caused Android/Linux Trouble in Europe

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Microsoft plans to cut 'thousands' of jobs: source

    Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) plans to cut "thousands" of jobs, with a majority of them outside the United States, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

    Reuters reported on Monday that Microsoft would undergo a reorganization that would impact its sales and marketing teams as the company doubles down on its fast-growing cloud business.

  • Exclusive: EU Considers Record Fine as Panel Checks Google Android Case-Sources [Ed: Microsoft initiated this, using all sorts of proxies several years back]

    EU antitrust regulators are weighing another record fine against Google over its Android mobile operating system and have set up a panel of experts to give a second opinion on the case, two people familiar with the matter said.

Why Microsoft (And Even Apple) Are Threatened By Google Chromebooks’ Popularity

Filed under
Linux
Google

Summary

Chromebooks easily surpassed Windows and Mac OS computers in the U.S. K-12 education market.

Alphabet’s cakewalk victory in the education market forced Microsoft to invent the walled-garden Windows 10 S. Apple now offers discounts to make its iPad more attractive to K-12 education customers.

Microsoft and Apple know that letting Google dominate the K-12 education is dangerous. The kids of today are tomorrow’s corporate workers and movers.

Instead of kids getting trained on Windows and Microsoft Office, a larger part of the U.S. K-12 education system is now being indoctrinated with Chrome OS, Android Apps, and Google Docs.

The Windows 10 S initiative is Microsoft trying to insure that its operating system and productivity software are not rendered irrelevant in the future.

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Chromebook and PCs With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • How to Install Ubuntu 17.04 with GNOME on Your Chromebook, Alongside Chrome OS

    Last year when I got my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740), I wrote a tutorial to teach you guys how to remove Google Chrome OS and install a GNU/Linux distribution of your choice, but things got boring.

    So after a few months, I reinstalled Chrome OS using a recovery image that Google provides on their website for this sort of things, which I wrote on a USB flash drive and booted from my Chromebook. Recently, I got bored again, and so I decided to install Ubuntu on my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740) using Crouton.

  • Is Chrome OS right for you? A 3-question quiz to find out

    Google's Chrome OS is one of the world's most misunderstood computing platforms. Chromebooks are foundationally different from traditional PCs, after all -- and consequently, there are a lot of misconceptions about how they work and what they can and cannot do.

    Since people are always asking me whether a Chromebook might be right for their needs, I thought I'd put together a quick guide to help any such wonderers figure it out. Whether it's you or someone you know who's curious, the following three questions should help shed some light on what the platform's all about and for whom it makes sense.

  • Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook Review: Built To Last

    Chromebooks are continuing to make an impact on the market and as a result, more Chromebooks are getting announced and almost on a monthly basis now. One of the most recent Chromebooks to be announced (April 2017) was the Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook. This is a Chromebook which looks to combine the standard Chrome OS experience with a device that is durable and hardworking. While also looking to ensure the price is competitive by Chromebook standards. In this case, the Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook is priced at $279.99 for the baseline model.

  • Dell XPS 15 (2017) review: Kaby Lake and a 4K display make a difference
  • My story until GSoC 2017

    It’s almost 9 years I am using GNU/Linux as my default Operating System. The first time I used GNU/Linux was in 2008, when I wanted to crack the password of the computers of my school in order to install and play the games I wanted. So my first contact with GNU/Linux was through OPHCrack. I was absolutely impressed when I could get the password of the computers of my school in less than ten minutes. I was 14 and I think I wanted to be a hacker. Goals changed through time, though.

Chromium, Chrome, and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Chromium Mus/Ozone update (H1/2017): wayland, x11

    Since January, Igalia has been working on a project whose goal is to make the latest Chromium Browser able to run natively on Wayland-based environments. The project has various phases, requires us to carve out existing implementations and align our work with the direction Chromium’s mainline is taking.

    In this post I will provide an update on the progresses we have made over 2017/H1, as well as our plans coming next.

    In order to jump straight to the latest results section (including videos) without the details, click here.

  • Browse Against the Machine

    I head up Firefox marketing, but I use Chrome every day. Works fine. Easy to use. Like most of us who spend too much time in front of a laptop, I have two browsers open; Firefox for work, Chrome for play, customized settings for each. There are multiple things that bug me about the Chrome product, for sure, but I‘m OK with Chrome. I just don’t like only being on Chrome.

  • Firefox hogs less memory and gets a speed bump in its latest update

    In an attempt to even the playing field with competitors, Mozilla Firefox stepped up its game Tuesday by releasing an update that will increase browser speeds and cut down on memory usage.

    Firefox 54 has opened up its upper limit of processes from one to four, although users can customize it to be more by entering “about:config” in the address bar and adjusting the settings themselves.

    This new version of Firefox feels faster and it scores higher on an online browser speed test than Chrome or Safari, even after opening 20 tabs, although it still gives the old loading sign on all of the pages. Firefox product vice president Nick Nguyen calls this upgrade “the largest change to Firefox code in our history,” according to his blog post detailing the changes.

  • [Older] Firefox memory usage with multiple content processes

    My previous measurements found that four content processes are a sweet spot for both memory usage and performance. As a follow up we wanted to run the tests again to confirm my conclusions and make sure that we’re testing on what we plan to release. Additionally I was able to work around our issues testing Microsoft Edge and have included both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Firefox on Windows; 32-bit is currently our default, 64-bit is a few releases out.

    The methodology for the test is the same as previous runs, I used the atsy project to load 30 pages and measure memory usage of the various processes that each browser spawns during that time.

Google open-sources mobile-first computer vision models for TensorFlow

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google is helping smartphones better recognize images without requiring massive power consumption, thanks to a new set of models the company released today. Called MobileNets, the pre-trained image recognition models let developers pick between a set of models that vary in size and accuracy to best suit what their application needs.

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Young programmer turns love of gaming into a Google Summer of Code project

Filed under
Google
Interviews
Gaming

Recently I installed the GCompris educational software suite on a friend's Linux laptop. While researching information about the application, I found out about Rudra Nil Basu, a young programmer from India, who has blogged about his contributions to GCompris. Based on his work, he was selected to be a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) participant and will receive a stipend to continue working to improve GCompris.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Rudra some questions about how he's translating his passion for game development into making learning fun for young children and supporting open source software and source code sharing. Some questions and answers have been lightly edited for clarity.

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Chrome 60 Beta, New Firefox, Thunderbird Themes

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 60 Beta Rolls Out With VP9 Improvements, New Developer Features

    Chrome 60 Beta adds a Paint Timing API to provide more insight to developers about their "first paint" performance, CSS font-display support, improvements to the Credential Management API, the Payment Request API has been added to desktop Chrome, there's a new Web Budget API to allow sites using push notifications to send a limited number of push messages that will trigger background work, support for Web Push Encryption was added, and a range of other CSS/JavaScript features and APIs.

  • The Best Firefox Ever

    On the Firefox team, one thing we always hear from our users is that they rely on the web for complex tasks like trip planning and shopping comparisons. That often means having many tabs open. And the sites and web apps running in those tabs often have lots of things going on– animations, videos, big pictures and more. Complex sites are more and more common. The average website today is nearly 2.5 megabytes – the same size as the original version of the game Doom, according to Wired. Up until now, a complex site in one Firefox tab could slow down all the others. That often meant a less than perfect browsing experience.

  • Thunderbird Arc Theme Updated With Support for Arc Variants

    An update to the Arc Thunderbird theme add-on is now available for download, and brings support for the 3 Arc GTK theme variants.

Browsers: Chrome 61, Mozilla Against Software Patents, Firefox Photon, and Tor 7.0

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Chrome 59 and Chromium

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
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More in Tux Machines

Mesa 17.3 RC5 and Early Stages of Linux 4.15

  • mesa 17.3.0-rc5
    The fifth release candidate for Mesa 17.3.0 is now available. This is the last planned release candidate before the final release. We still have a couple of regressions in our tracker [1] although I'm anticipating for those to be resolved by EOW.
  • Mesa 17.3-RC5 Released, Official Mesa 3D Update Expected By Next Week
    The Mesa 17.3 release game is in overtime but it should be wrapping up in the days ahead. Emil Velikov of Collabora announced the Mesa 17.3-RC5 release candidate this morning. He anticipates it being the last release candidate, but there still are a few blocker bugs open. As of writing there still are 4 bugs open with one pertaining to Gallium3D Softpipe and the others being Intel driver issues.
  • Extra KVM Changes For Linux 4.15 Bring UMIP Support, AMD SEV Changes Delayed
    As some additional work past the KVM changes for Linux 4.15 submitted last week, a few more feature items have been queued. The second batch of Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) updates sent in today for Linux 4.15 include ARM GICv4 support, x86 bug fixes, the AMD VFIO NFT performance fix, and x86 guest UMIP support. Landing already with Linux 4.15 is Intel UMIP capabilities for User-Mode Instruction Prevention to prevent certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. This latest KVM pull update adds this UMIP support to its space for both real and emulated guests.
  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 4.15
    Of the many changes coming for Linux 4.15, as detailed this weekend Radeon GPU and AMD CPU customers have a lot to be thankful for with this new kernel update currently in development. Here are some initial benchmarks of the Linux 4.15 development kernel using an AMD EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread setup. When it comes to EPYC in Linux 4.15, the kernel side-bits have landed for Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV), CPU temperature monitoring support now working, and improved NUMA node balancing.

Videos: Akademy 2017 Talk, Upgrading Linux Mint, This Week in Linux

  • Akademy 2017 talk
    The talk by Jean-Baptiste Mardelle’s at Akademy 2017 is released along with many other interesting talks. Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community.
  • How To In-place Upgrade Linux Mint
    This video shows how to upgrade Linux Mint from 17.3 to 18.3 while keeping all of your personal data intact. Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.
  • Linux Kernel 4.14, Firefox Quantum, Fedora 27, Munich? Meh | This Week in Linux 14
    On this episode of This Week in Linux. The first 6 Year LTS Linux Kernel was released this week. Huge Update from Mozilla with Firefox Quantum. New distro releases from Fedora and Slax.

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend. Read more

Microsoft Worker Leaves for Google, Criticizes Post-Windows Vista Dev Strategy

Microsoft employee Tim Sneath, who spent no less than 17 years with the company, announced in a blog post that he’s leaving the software giant to work for Google on the new Flutter mobile framework. Sneath started his post by emphasizing how great Microsoft is, explaining that he company has “incredibly diverse interests” and is “filled with talented people.” Despite the good parts, however, the former Microsoft Program Manager who worked on a series of projects for developers, discussed what he described as the “missteps” that the Redmond-based software giant embraced beginning with the Windows Vista era. Read more Also: ‘Goodbye Microsoft, hello Linux’