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Chrome 66

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Google

Google’s updated AIY Vision and Voice kits ship with Raspberry Pi Zero WH

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Linux
Google

Google has launched new versions of its AIY Voice Kit ($50) and AIY Vision Kit ($90) that bundle a Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBC. Google also released an Android app for AIY Projects.

Google and Target have launched updated, and more complete, versions of Google’s AIY Projects kits for audio voice agent and visual neural network processing development that bundle a Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBC. In addition, users of Google’s existing AIY Voice Kit and AIY Vision Kit can now download an Android companion app that works with all old and new AIY kits.

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Android: postmarketOS Update, Android P Names, and Fuchsia Friday

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Android
Google
  • Introducing #postmarketOS-lowlevel

    As a community project, and one that encourages contributors to work on what they like, we have attracted people with a broad range of interests and skill levels. Recently a small hacking group #postmarketOS-lowlevel has emerged, and its masterminds @McBitter and @unrznbl are eager to introduce you to the madness that awaits when digging deeper and deeper in the embedded hardware and software stack.

    But before we get started, please keep in mind that these are moon shots. So while there is some little progress, it's mostly about letting fellow hackers know what we've tried and what we're up to, in the hopes of attracting more interested talent to our cause. After all, our philosophy is to keep the community informed and engaged during the development phase!

    For those new to postmarketOS, we are a group of developers, hackers, and hobbyists who have come together with a common goal of giving a ten year life cycle to mobile phones. This is accomplished by using a simple and sustainable architecture borrowed from typical Linux distributions, instead of using Android's build system. The project is at an early stage and isn't useful for most people at this point. Check out the newly-updated front page for more information, the previous blog post for recent achievements, and the closed pull requests to be informed about what's going on up to the current minute.

  • What Are Some Android P Name Predictions? We Found 17 Desserts
  • Fuchsia Friday: The dream team behind Google’s new OS

    On the Fuchsia team there are approximately 160 Google employees who have contributed to one of the four layers of Fuchsia. This is not counting managers and team leads who haven’t directly contributed code. Comparing it to other OS teams, this is not a significant number, and is a sign of the stage of development Google likely considers Fuchsia to be in.

Google Fuchsia is not Linux: So, what is it and who will use it?

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Android
Google

Google's not-Linux OS documentation cracks box open at last

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OS
Linux
Google

Google has published details of its "Fuchsia" operating system.

The last time we updated readers on the OS it needed fair amount of work to get going.

Now, Google has decided it's time it gave the world something more informative than a bunch of Git-managed open-source code, and this week published what it calls The Book: a programmer-oriented guide to interacting with Fuchsia (which, The Book emphasized, is Not Linux).

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Why Classrooms Are Apple, Google and Microsoft's Next Big Battleground

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Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Google’s Chromebooks accounted for 59.6% of mobile computing shipments in the kindergarten through 12th grade market in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. By comparison, Windows accounted for 25.6% and iOS comprised 10.6% of shipments.

Among the reasons tech giants are scrambling to get their gadgets into schools: It’s a big business opportunity. The education technology market is expected to reach $252 billion by 2020, according to a report published by education-focused technology conference host EdTechXGlobal and advisory firm IBIS Capital. But there’s potential upside even after students leave the classroom and turn into fully-fledged consumers, too. “It gets people using your technology young,” says Avi Greengart, research director for consumer platforms and devices for GlobalData. “The hope is that they stick with it.”

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Meet Acer Chromebook Tab 10, World's First Chrome OS Tablet for Education

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GNU
Linux
Google

Acer unveiled on Monday the world's first tablet powered by Google's Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, targeting schools and other educational institutions.

A day ahead of Apple's "Let's Take a Field Trip" educational event where a new, cheaper iPad will be unveiled, Acer announced Chromebook Tab 10, the first Chrome OS tablet, which promises to replace computers in K-12 classrooms across the globe, enhancing and expanding student learning thanks to the simplicity, speed, and features of Google's Chrome OS Linux-based operating system.

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Also: 64-bit, Reluctantly

Billions at stake as Oracle beats Google in latest Android Java API legal dustup

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Development
Google

Like it or not -- and most developers hate it -- the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in 2014 that APIs could be copyrighted. Because of that decision, the legal battle between Google and Oracle over whether Google had the right to use Java APIs in Android without compensation has dragged on for years. In the last go-around, Google won again because a jury found that Google's use of Java APIs was allowed because it constituted "fair use". Done? Over? Not so fast. Now the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit ruled Google's Java API work wasn't fair use.

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Browsers: Mozilla and Chrome

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Google
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Presses Pause on Facebook Advertising

    Mozilla is pressing pause on our Facebook advertising. Facebook knows a great deal about their two billion users — perhaps more intimate information than any other company does. They know everything we click and like on their site, and know who our closest friends and relationships are. Because of its scale, Facebook has become one of the most convenient platforms to reach an audience for all companies and developers, whether a multibillion corporation or a not-for-profit.

  • Results of the MDN “Duplicate Pages” SEO experiment

    Following in the footsteps of MDN’s “Thin Pages” SEO experiment done in the autumn of 2017, we completed a study to test the effectiveness and process behind making changes to correct cases in which pages are perceived as “duplicates” by search engines. In SEO parlance, “duplicate” is a fuzzy thing. It doesn’t mean the pages are identical—this is actually pretty rare on MDN in particular—but that the pages are similar enough that they are not easily differentiated by the search engine’s crawling technology.

  • Send, getting better

    Send continues to improve incrementally. Since our last post we’ve added a few requested features and fixed a bunch of bugs. You can now choose to allow multiple downloads and change the password on a file if you need to.

    Send is also more stable and should work more reliably across a wider set of browsers. We’ve brought back support for Microsoft Edge and some older versions of Safari.

  • Chrome 66 Beta: CSS Typed Object Model, Async Clipboard API, AudioWorklet

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 66 on ChromeStatus.

  • Chrome 66 Beta Delivers On Async Clipboard API, Web Locks API

    Following the Chrome 65 release earlier this month, Google developers have now catapulted the Chrome 66 beta.

Android/Google: Pixel 2, Xiaomi Kernel Source, David Kleidermacher on Security

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Android
Google
  • Google Pixel 2 Portrait Mode Tech Is Now Open Source

    The tech behind the portrait mode on Google Pixel 2  has been made open source by the company. For those who not familiar with it, one of the main draw to the algorithm in the Pixel 2’s camera app is excellent subject isolation without needing additional apparatus such as specialized lens or second camera.

  • Xiaomi releases Oreo kernel source code for the Mi A1

    Xiaomi promised that the Mi A1 would receive Oreo by the end of 2017, and the company hit a buzzer-beater by rolling out Android 8.0 to the Android One device on December 30th. But the kernel source code was nowhere to be found, a violation of the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2), and an affront to the development and enthusiast community. It's about two-and-a-half months late, but Xiaomi has finally released the Android 8.0 Oreo source code for the Mi A1.

  • Google Says Android Is as Secure as Apple's iOS and Wants You to Know That

    Google's Android security chief David Kleidermacher told CNET today that the Linux-based Android mobile operating system the company develops for a wide range of devices is now as secure as Apple's iOS.

    Google recently published its "Android Security 2017 Year In Review" report where the company talks about how Android security has matured in the last few years and how it fights to find new ways to protect Android users from malware and all the other nasty stuff you obviously don't want to have on your mobile phone or tablet.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland
    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration. This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.
  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support
    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context. Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.
  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode
    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements. First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.
  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018
    - The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop. This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.
  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19
    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation To Be Renamed Fedora Silverblue
    - Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue. Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".
  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot
    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More
    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".
  • Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More
    Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.
  • A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts
    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time
    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report. Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing. The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”
  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer
    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer. HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.

HHVM 3.27 Released