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Chromebook/Google/Gentoo Security

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Gentoo
Google
Security
  • Google has doubled its bounty for a Chromebook hack to $100,000

    Google doubled the bounty it will pay for a successful exploit of its Chromebook laptop to $100,000, sweetening the pot in hopes of drawing more attention from security researchers.

    The larger reward is intended for someone who finds a persistent compromise of a Chromebook in guest mode, according to Google's security blog on Monday.

  • Google's Bug Bounty for a Chromebook Hack Rises to $100,000

    We've reported a few times on bug bounties--cash prizes offered by open source communities to anyone who finds key software bugs--ranging from bounties offered by Google (for the Chrome browser) and Mozilla. This open method of discovering security vulnerabilities has been embraced at Google, especially. In fact, Google has offered up as much as $1 million to people who identify key vulnerabilities in the Chrome browser.

Google’s smartwatch king has a 50-year vision for the future of Android Wear

Filed under
Android
Google

It was Android head Hiroshi Lockheimer who kickstarted the Android Wear properly. Singleton, who is British, had been working at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, when "Hiroshi was actually thinking we should get a project started on watches and asked me to come back to the mobile team to work on Android Wear."

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Google Patches Android for Stagefright in March Update

Filed under
Android
Google
Security

Among the related libraries is the core Android mediaserver, which Google is patching this month for six different vulnerabilities. Two of the issues (CVE-2016-0815 and CVE-2016-0816) are identified as critical vulnerabilities in mediaserver that could lead to a potential remote-code execution.

Another two issues (CVE-2016-0826 and CVE-2016-0827) are privilege escalation vulnerabilities in Android that Google rates as high-severity issues. Google has identified two more high-severity issues (CVE-2016-0828 and CVE-2016-0829) in mediaserver as information-disclosure vulnerabilities.

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5 Free Alternatives To Google Drive On Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google Drive is one of the most popular, fremium cloud storage service from Google. Gdrive is an official client for Google drive and a must have application for Windows. But sadly the most popular service can't be used on Linux via any official client like Gdrive. So I thought to find free alternatives to Google Drive on Linux and I came up with the list of 5 free cloud storage services that provide client for Linux. I know you'll love it.

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How to turn your old PC into a speedy Chromebook for free

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

One of the great ironies of the cloud computing age is that the five to ten year old laptop gathering dust in your desk drawer probably has more horsepower than a top of the line Chromebook which just hit the market. That means you can take a long dormant unit out of retirement and it will typically run quite quickly when paired with a lightweight operating system like Chrome.

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ReactOS News

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
OSS
  • ReactOS Participation in Google Summer of Code 2016
  • ReactOS: Building a Free-Licensed Windows

    From dual-booting to WINE, free software has always struggled to provide a solution for running Windows applications. However, few of these efforts have been more ambitious than ReactOS, a free-licensed implementation of Windows. The project has been at work since 2006 and, in February 2016, ReactOS finally released its first alpha version, after a decade of difficult and necessarily cautious development.

  • ReactOS Gains Btrfs File-System Support

    ReactOS, the project aiming for binary compatibility with Microsoft Windows (Server 2003), now has Btrfs file-system support.

    While there's just a primitive Btrfs driver for Windows, ReactOS has already gained native Btrfs file-system support.

Google Gives iOS Devs Open Source EarlGrey Testing Tool

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google last week introduced EarlGrey, a functional user interface testing framework for Apple iOS apps.

YouTube, Google Calendar, Google Photos, Google Translate and Google Play Music have successfully adopted the framework, the company said.

EarlGrey has been open sourced under the Apache license, according to Google's Siddartha Janga. The company has provided app developers with a start guide and the ability to add EarlGrey to their projects using CocoaPods or to add it manually to Xcode project files.

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Google/ChromeOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Revisiting The Google Pixel C - Better, But Not There Yet
  • Is Google's Pixel C worth buying?

    A writer at AnandTech did a full review of Google's Pixel C a while back, but now he's gotten a more up to date unit from the company. Has the Pixel C gotten better than when it was first reviewed? Or does Google still have room for significant improvements?

  • Neverware Brings Windows Into Its Anti-Aging Fold

    The heart of the CloudReady OS is the Chromium OS, Google's open source version of the Chrome OS.

  • Experimenting with Hardware

    The computer turned on with absolute disregard of my fears. After pretty much the same lines that Linux shows upon start, my familiar GRUB2 greeted me, asking if I wanted to boot Mageia, PCLinuxOS, OpenMandriva, or Windows XP (the OS that I haven't booted in maybe three years).

  • Google to shut down Play for Education in March

    Google has been running a small segment of its Play Store designed specifically for educational users for the past two years, as part of the tech giant’s efforts to increase tablet adoption in schools. However, the Play for Education initiative will be coming to an end sometime next month, as there simply isn’t that much demand for the service.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Google
  • Plex Media Server on the Raspberry Pi 2 – Joy and Anguish

    Over the years, I have been collecting DVDs, backing up the movies to a desktop computer for playback on its big screen. Recently, projects like Kodi and Plex media server came along and promised to not only offer those same movies in a pleasing GUI, but to gather metadata about the movies and to save my place when I access them from different places. I would love to have a dedicated server so I don’t need to continuously run my desktop computer, but I’m too cheap to spring for a dedicated NAS. The raspberry pi 2 promises an easy way to accomplish this goal without first having to earn a degree in computer science.

  • App: CalPlus for Samsung Z1 and Z3 Tizen Smartphone

    CalPlus for Tizen smartphones like the Samsung Z1 and Z3 is a financial calculator. Actually no it isn’t, in-fact it is a set of financial calculators that lets you do some crazy financial number wizardry.

  • Samsung Z1 Tizen 2.4 Firmware / Software update hits Bangladesh

    The Z1 originally launched with Tizen 2.3, but following the launch of the Tizen 2.4 Beta Software Test Program in India, users have been looking forward to getting the final Tizen 2.4 release for their device. The Z1 has currently been released in several countries including India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. There is no Information at present when the latter mentioned countries will get this update.

  • Shashlik 0.9 Released For Running Android Apps On Linux

    Shashlik is the KDE-aligned project for running Android apps on Linux outside of a traditional Android environment. A new version of this open-source project is now available.

Google and IBM Openwashing

Filed under
Google
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

How To Build A Raspberry Pi Smartwatch — The Geekiest Watch Ever Made

In our Getting Started With Raspberry Pi series, we’ve introduced you to the basics of Pi, told you how to get everything you need, and help you boot a basic operating system. But, Raspberry Pi is much more than that. You can use it as a TOR proxy router, build your own PiPhone, and even install Windows 10 IoT. This little device comes with lots of flexibility, that allows it to be used in multiple applications. Well, did you ever think about wearing your Raspberry Pi? If your answer is NO, I won’t be surprised. If you imagine a scenario where Raspberry Pi is used to build a smartwatch, it would look too bulky. Well, that’s the thing about making geeky things that set you apart from the regular crowd, right? Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Released
    Today marks the second alpha release for Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" flavors participating in these early development releases. Participating in today's Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 development milestone are Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Kylin. No Xubuntu or Kubuntu releases to report on this morning.
  • PSA: Ubuntu 15.10 Hits End of Life Today
    It's time to wave a weary goodbye to the Wily Werewolf, as Ubuntu 15.10 support ends today.
  • Jono Bacon on Life After (and Before) GitHub
    Do you want to know what it takes to be a professional community manager? This interview will show you the kind of personality that does well at it, and how Jono Bacon, one of the world’s finest community managers, discovered Linux and later found his way into community management. Bacon is world-famous as the long-time community manager for Ubuntu. He was so good, I sometimes think his mother sang “you’ll be a community manager by and by” to him when he was a baby. In 2014 he went to XPRIZE, not a FOSS company, but important nevertheless. From there he dove back into FOSS as community manager for GitHub. Now Bacon is a freelance, self-employed community manager. One of his major clients is HackerOne, whose CEO is Bacon’s and my mutual friend Mårten Mickos. But HackerOne is far from his only client. In the interview he says he recently got back from visiting a client in China, and that he has more work then he can handle.

I've been Linuxing since before you were born

Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows. When it comes to Windows, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Despite adding 20+ gigabytes of gosh-knows-what, Windows is mostly the same. (Except you can't drop to a DOS prompt to get actual work done.) Hey, who remembers Gorilla.bas, the exploding banana game that came in DOS? Fun times! The Internet never forgets, and you can play a Flash version on Kongregate.com. Apple changed, evolving from a friendly system that encouraged hacking to a sleek, sealed box that you are not supposed to open, and that dictates what hardware interfaces you are allowed to use. 1998: no more floppy disk. 2012: no more optical drive. The 12-inch MacBook has only a single USB Type-C port that supplies power, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, external storage, video output, and accessories. If you want to plug in more than one thing at a time and don't want to tote a herd of dongles and adapters around with you, too bad. Next up: The headphone jack. Yes, the one remaining non-proprietary standard hardware port in Apple-land is doomed. Read more