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Google reveals nationalities of students in open source-focused Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS

Every summer, many students get excited for some well-deserved time off from studies; well, if their region practices such a vacation, that is. In some cultures, school is year-round. While this is unfortunate from the standpoint of socializing and having fun, it arguably keeps the students on track for great success.

For students that are particularly motivated and education-focused, Google hosts its legendary Summer of Code. This program pairs future developers with open source projects. Not only do these young folks learn, but they get to contribute to the projects as well. Today, the search giant shares the nationalities of the students participating in Summer of Code 2016. For the first time ever, Albania has a representative -- woo-hoo! This may surprise you, but the USA is not the most-represented nation. The top country, however, may shock you -- or not.

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Chromebooks are about to take over and Apple and Microsoft should be worried

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chromebooks are about to take over and Apple and Microsoft should be worried

    A few days ago, Google announced that Chromebooks will soon be able to run Android apps from the Google Play app store, finally making them fully capable computers and putting them in a position to put a real dent in Apple and Microsoft's dominance in PCs.

  • When Chromebooks run Android apps, do we still need Android tablets?

    After years of hinting that the lines between Android and Chrome OS were getting thinner and blurrier, Google recently announced that Chromebooks would soon be able to run just about any Android app. The Google Play Store will be available for three Chromebooks with touchscreen displays starting in June, and the list of Chrome OS laptops, desktops, and other devices that will gain access to Android apps is pretty long… and expected to get longer.

  • This portable computer runs on Chromium OS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Android TV

    Fancy, a portable desktop computer Running Chromium OS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Android TV and powered by AMD 5350 Quad-Core x86 processor

    Imagine a desktop computer, that too a portable one, being run on both Chromium OS and Linux and allowing to watch you Android TV as well. Dylan Callahan has made that possible by fusing all these three independent features into one computer called Fancy Computer.

Google/ChromeOS

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Meet Fancy, a Tiny Computer Running Chromium OS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Android TV

    Softpedia has been informed by Dylan Callahan from the Chromium OS for All SBCs projects about the availability for purchase of a portable desktop computer called Fancy.

    Fancy has been designed with a single goal in mind, to offer Linux, Chromium OS/Chrome OS, and Android enthusiasts one of the fanciest, yet portable and quite powerful desktop computer that comes in a small form factor (the size of a regular cable modem or wireless router) and it's easy to carry anywhere you want.

  • ChromeOS – Android’s arrival?

    You can buy an HP Chromebook at around £199 in the UK. Or you can get a HP traditional laptop, with dvd burner and 500gb HD for £60 more….if you were really daft you could install ChromeOS on that and have a better spec’d machine with 50x more storage capacity.

    Chromebooks as a general rule may be cheaper, but I don’t think they are better value.

Chromebook + Android apps = Trouble for Windows PCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • ​Chromebook + Android apps = Trouble for Windows PCs

    Chromebooks are already outselling Macs. So Linus Torvalds is wondering if this really might be the year of the Linux desktop. With the addition of Android apps to the Chromebook, maybe it really will be.

  • Shipments of Chromebooks integrated with Google Play set to increase

    Google has announced that new Chromebooks rolled out by its notebook partners will start supporting Google Play, a move which is likely to substantially ramp up shipments of Chromebooks.

  • Chrome OS to get Android apps via the magic of containers

    Google has pulled the move the software market has been waiting ages for, and built a system to run Android apps on its desktop operating system.

    The system works by setting up a Linux container in the Chrome operating system that runs a complete version of Android in a locked-down environment to minimize security issues. It's not an emulated version of Android, so there should be a minimum number of issues, Chrome OS team leader Kan Liu told developers at the Google I/O conference.

  • Chromebooks Gaining Share
  • Why do you use Linux?

    Regardless of what caused you to first make the switch, it's exciting to be a part of a community that supports so many different needs with a single ecosystem of overlapping project. The Linux community gives you choice, through a variety of distributions, to find an operating system that finely matches your individual needs.

Chromebooks outsold Macs for the first time in the US

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google

Google's low-cost Chromebooks outsold Apple's range of Macs for the first time in the US recently. While IDC doesn't typically break out Windows vs. Chromebook sales, IDC analyst Linn Huang confirmed the milestone to The Verge. "Chrome OS overtook Mac OS in the US in terms of shipments for the first time in 1Q16," says Huang. "Chromebooks are still largely a US K-12 story."

IDC estimates Apple's US Mac shipments to be around 1.76 million in the latest quarter, meaning Dell, HP, and Lenovo sold nearly 2 million Chromebooks in Q1 combined. Chromebooks have been extremely popular in US schools, and it's clear from IDC's comments the demand is driving US shipments. Outside of the US, it's still unclear exactly how well Google's low-cost laptops are doing. Most data from market research firms like IDC and Gartner focuses solely on Google's wins in the US.

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Oracle-Google

Filed under
Android
Google

Google's New Parser

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 Projects Announced

    Google announced this week the participating student projects for this year's Summer of Code.

  • GSoC 2016 at coala

    coala participates in this GSoC under the PSF umbrella. This year we got a stunning number of 8 GSoC projects just working with us.

  • GSoC 2016 is Starting at GNOME

    Dear GSoC Students, dear GNOME community – and especially dear rejected students,

    Google Summer of Code 2016 is starting. GNOME has accepted 21 students – we are thrilled to work with you people!

LLVM/Clang and Google

Filed under
Development
Google
BSD
  • RFC: EfficiencySanitizer

    We plan to build a suite of compiler-based dynamic instrumentation tools for analyzing targeted performance problems. These tools will all live under a new "EfficiencySanitizer" (or "esan") sanitizer umbrella, as they will share significant portions of their implementations.

  • Google Is Working On An Efficiency Sanitizer To Improve Performance Problems

    Derek Bruening of Google has announced the company's interest in creating an "Efficiency Sanitizer" for LLVM/Clang for analyzing targeted performance problems.

    Worked on Google and other compoanies have been Address Sanitizer, Memory Sanitizer, Thread Sanitizer, Leak Sanitizer, Data Flow Sanitizer, and other sanitizers found in LLVM/Clang some of which have also been ported to GCC. These sanitizers have been incredibly helpful for developers in catching various problems within program code-bases, including many security issues. The latest focus being pursued by Google's compiler engineers is on an Efficiency Sanitizer.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more