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Go 1.6 and Development by Women

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.6 is released

    Today we release Go version 1.6, the seventh major stable release of Go. You can grab it right now from the download page. Although the release of Go 1.5 six months ago contained dramatic implementation changes, this release is more incremental.

    The most significant change is support for HTTP/2 in the net/http package. HTTP/2 is a new protocol, a follow-on to HTTP that has already seen widespread adoption by browser vendors and major websites. In Go 1.6, support for HTTP/2 is enabled by default for both servers and clients when using HTTPS, bringing the benefits of the new protocol to a wide range of Go projects, such as the popular Caddy web server.

  • Go 1.6 Released
  • Women write better open source code on GitHub than men [Ed: conveniently (and wrongly) concludes from that it’s FOSS (not CS) that discriminates against women]

    Woman may be more competent than men at writing code but still there is evidence that they are discriminated against in open source communities because they are women.

  • A New Study Suggests That Women Write Better Code Than Men

    A recent study conducted by researchers from the computer science departments at Cal Poly, San Luis, Obispo and North Carolina State University reports that women write better code than men.

  • If Women Are Better at Coding, It’s Because They Have to Be

I bought my mom a Chromebook Pixel and everything is so much better now

Filed under
Linux
Google

The problem: most of the Chromebooks on the market feel cheap. They're generally marketed as secondary computers, so they're made to be inexpensive, and that means almost all of them are made of cheap-feeling plastic. There's nothing wrong with that, but I needed to pass the sleek test. The only viable option was Google's own Chromebook Pixel, which is an amazingly beautiful machine that's ridiculously expensive by most normal standards, because it's a thousand-dollar computer that just runs Chrome. It sounds insane: most tech products that cost a thousand dollars do many, many more things than simply running a web browser. I spent weeks tossing the idea around every chance I got, just to see if it would ever sound less like I was slowly going crazy.

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Google peddles Linux based load balancer to open sourcers

Filed under
Linux
Google
OSS

Google has developed an open source infrastructure software build using its Go language.

The ad-flinger has released the Seesaw load balancer for Linux, built to replace two existing systems.

Code has been released to GitHub here.

Google’s site reliability engineer, Joel Sing, blogged that Seesaw would increase the availability of service and reduce the management overhead.

“We are pleased to be able to make this platform available to the rest of the world and hope that other enterprises will be able to benefit,” Sing wrote.

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Seesaw Liberated

Filed under
Google
  • Google’s ‘Seesaw’ Load Balancer Goes Open Source

    If you’re a network or systems administrator, you’re likely familiar with the concept of a load balancer. It’s a hardware device or software stack that distributes network application load across all the machines and servers connected to it in order to help mitigate network congestion. Google’s software solution, called Seesaw, was created in 2012 in response to a lack of adequate load balancing software for Google’s own use. Coded in Google’s own Go language, the software boasted a flexible Linux backbone and was used to manage Google’s own network needs, which entailed things like automated deployment and ease of use and maintenance.

  • Google Open Sources Its Seesaw Load Balancer

    Google announced today that it is open-sourcing Seesaw — a Linux-based load balancing system. The code for the project, which is written in Google’s Go language, is now available on GitHub under the Apache license.

    As Google Site Reliability Engineer Joel Sing, who works on the company’s corporate infrastructure, writes in today’s announcement, Google used to use two different load balancing systems back in 2012. Both, however, “presented different sets of management and stability challenges.” So to fix this, he and his team set out to find a new solution and because the ones available at the time didn’t meet Google’s needs, they started writing their own.

Google deep learning capabilities heading to Android, creating phones that can think like people

Filed under
Android
Google

Your next Android phone might be able to see like a real human being.

Google has announced that it is to integrated deep learning into its phone operating system, allowing the phones to use algorithms to recognise what is in pictures and think about it like a person.

The company has begun a tie-up with Movidius, a company that makes chips that help with “machine vision”. The two companies have already worked together on Google’s Project Tango, which uses a series of cameras to allow computers to be able to see spaces in 3D.

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How Google backed an open source winner

Filed under
Google
OSS

It’s hard to fault the pedigree of Google’s Kubernetes container management tool, and it seems many of the world’s cloud-forward enterprises agree.

Inspired by Borg – Google’s internal container management software, which manages the two billion-plus containers the web giant starts each week – Kubernetes has scale in its DNA.

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Desktop GNU/Linux and Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chrome 32-bit

Filed under
Google
Web

Google Open Sources Dataflow Analytics Code through Apache Incubator

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google is open-sourcing more code by contributing Cloud Dataflow to the Apache Software Foundation. The move, a first for Google, opens new cloud-based data analytics options and integration opportunities for big data companies.

Cloud Dataflow is a platform for processing large amounts of data in the cloud. It features an open source, Java-based SDK, which makes it easy to integrate with other cloud-centric analytics and Big Data tools.

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Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition Officially Released Based on Slackware 14.2, Xfce 4.12

After being in development for the past three months, the Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition operating system has finally hit the stable channels, and it is now available for download. Based on the Slackware 14.2 GNU/Linux distribution and built around the lightweight and highly customizable Xfce 4.12 desktop environment, Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition ships with numerous improvements and new features that some of you who managed to test-drive the Beta and Release Candidate pre-releases are already accustomed with. Of course, many of the core components and default applications have been updated to their latest versions. Read more

Leftovers: Security

  • Tor 0.2.8.7 Addresses Important Bug Related to ReachableAddresses Option
    The Tor Project, through Nick Mathewson, is pleased to inform the Tor community about the release and general availability of yet another maintenance update to the Tor 0.2.8 stable series.
  • Emergency Service Window for Kolab Now
    We’re going to need to free up a hypervisor and put its load on other hypervisors, in order to pull out the one hypervisor and have some of its faulty hardware replaced — but there’s two problems; The hypervisor to free up has asserted required CPU capabilities most of the eligible targets do not have — this prevents a migration that does not involve a shut down, reconfiguration, and restart of the guest.

TheSSS 19.0 Linux Server Out with Kernel 4.4.14, Apache 2.4.23 & MariaDB 10.1.16

TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) is one of the lightest Linux kernel-based operating systems designed to be used as an all-around server for home users, as well as small- and medium-sized businesses looking for a quick and painless way of distributing files across networks or to simply test some web-based software. Read more

GNOME Control Center 3.22 to Update the Keyboard Settings, Improve Networking

The upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment is still in the works, and a first Beta build was seeded to public beta testers last week, bringing multiple enhancements and new features to most of its core components and apps. While GNOME 3.22 Beta was announced on August 22, it appears that the maintainers of certain core packages needed a little more time to work on various improvements and polish their applications before they were suitable for public testing. And this is the case of GNOME Control Center, which was recently updated to version 3.21.90, which means 3.22 Beta. Read more