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Best Business Apps for Chrome and Chrome OS

Filed under
Android
Google

Chrome is going places these days. Google's browser-turned-desktop is proving out to be a dark horse in the OS marketplace. A few years after its first release, Chrome has turned itself into a veritable threat to Microsoft's dominant empire. The recent Scroogled campaign targeted at Chromebooks only seems to confirm the fact that Google is slowly spreading its claws into a domain that is solely controlled by Redmond.

For business owners, Chrome offers a lot of choices. It is free from the cycle of operating systems and the agony they bring with their difficult licensing, while also in sync with most of the Google services they already use. Those benefits aside, Chromebooks are cheap, well designed, and are extremely fast. The success of Chromebooks is worrying Microsoft so much that they cut Windows licensing fee by a significant amount.

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I am working exclusively from a Chromebook -- here's how and why

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Despite that I've owned an HP 11 Chromebook since its release, I've viewed it as little more than a novelty. I work from an office on the third floor of my home, which has a nice size desk, desktop PC and 15.6 inch laptop, both running Windows 8.1.

However, as the weather warms (finally!) I considered making the move out to my porch, something I did last summer as well. In that case I lugged the Windows laptop with me, not a difficult task, but the size is really more than I need for carrying around.

This time I elected to give the HP 11 a shot, as it's light and easy to carry. The only question was "how will I do my job?"

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Android-x86 4.4 RC2 KitKat Is a Linux Distro for PCs Based on the OS from Google

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Some of you might not know this, but Android is actually based on the Linux kernel, although the Google developers are releasing it with a modified version of the kernel. This has been the case right from the beginning and the Android source has been released under a number of open source pieces of software.

This doesn't mean that any company can get the source code and start shipping devices with the OS just because it is open source. The problem is a little more complicated than this and it has to do with the type of license. The source code may be open source, but if you plan to make money off it you will need to cut Google a part of your pie, if by any chance you are going to also use services like Gmail or any other proprietary software.

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Open Source Chief at Redhat Hit With Bogus Copyright Claims

Filed under
Red Hat
Google

Bogus copyright claims on YouTube are getting more and more prevalent, but they only get exposure when they do damage to high-profile targets. Michael Tiemann is the Chief of Open Source Affairs at Redhat Inc. and apparently he can't use Creative Commons music in his uploads without being bombarded with copyright claims.

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CoreOS Linux distro lands on the Google Cloud Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google

Designed for massive server deployments, CoreOS consumes less than 200MB of working memory per instance

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Stable Channel Update: Chrome 35

Filed under
Google

The Chrome Team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 35 to the Stable channel for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Chrome 35.0.1916.114 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including:
More developer control over touch input
New JavaScript features
Unprefixed Shadow DOM
A number of new apps/extension APIs
Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance.

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Linux FTW: Lenovo launches two Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The world’s leading PC maker Lenovo has also joined the Linux band-wagon and launched its first Linux-powered Chromebook for consumers space – earlier Lenovo offered Chromebooks for education. Lenovo has announced two Chromebooks – N20 and N20p. While both Chromebooks are identical, N20p offers a touchscreen display and its keyboard can flex 300° backward to convert from Laptop mode to Stand mode. So users can use the 10-finger touchscreen to consume content. It’s definitely a great device for both content consumption as well as content creation.

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HP Chromebook 11 redesign quietly appears

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The new Chromebook has the latter design, much to the surprise of Youtuber Lachlan, who discovered the alternate Chromebook 11 and posted a video of it. Apparently, Lachlan, who resides in Australia, purchased what was labelled as a “white Chromebook 11″, but soon realized that it was not the same as the other Chromebooks 11, but rather a miniature Chromebook 14.

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Google Chrome 36 Dev Adds Extra Step for Profile Deletion

Filed under
Google
Software

Google developers have released a new build of their Chrome browser, 36.0.1976.2, and this is quite a hefty update, full of various changes and improvements. Even so, it’s not recommended that you switch to the new version, if you already are running on of the two other branches, Stable or Beta.

Developers usually make the big changes in the Development branch and most of those modifications trickle down into the Beta, and then finally into the Stable. It may take a while for all the features to be implemented for the majority of users, but this is the safest way to do it.

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Why a Chromebook is the best Mother’s Day gift

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The last reason why you should get your mom a Chromebook is their value. Currently, the most expensive Chromebook available for purchase is the HP Chromebook 14 at $299 or $349, depending on which version you get. This is the one I purchased, since it has the largest screen for a Chromebook, and has Intel’s new Haswell Celeron processors. (For more on my thoughts of the HP Chromebook 14, click here). Most other Chromebooks only cost $199 to $299, and that is if you purchase it new. Chromebooks can be purchased used, and still seem like a brand new laptop, as long as they look new cosmetically.

This may seem expensive as a mother’s day gift, but do not think about it as a one time gift, but as a long term investment. Your mother will never have to purchase a new computer again, since Chromebooks are built to last forever and come with free updates. She will never have to purchase antivirus again, nor any other software, since most of the apps on the Chrome Web Store are free. (For a guide on the Chrome Web Store, click here). By purchasing your mom a Chromebook, you save her from ever having to worry about her computer again. This saves both your mom and you time and money.

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Operating System U Fails To Live Up To Its Goals

After launching last month on Kickstarter, the project has turned into a failure and all development has ceased. Operating System U by Andrew Bernstein only raised $1,948 of its $50,000 goal over the month-long period for the OS that claimed numerous advantages over Ubuntu and Windows 8. Andrew then posted, "Unfortunately OS U was unsuccessful. I truly, truly appreciate everyone who backed us, but unfortunately since we where unsuccessful, combined with other circumstances, OS U will not have any more continued development." Read more

Calculate Intro, OpenMandriva Review, and Mageia Delay

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Early Morning Linux Voodoo at Denny’s

I could tell that he wasn’t comfortable turning over control of his laptop to a stranger, but after a few seconds I got a slight nod to the affirmative. I pulled the Acer over to my part of the counter and booted the Linux Mint KDE LTS I keep for just such purposes. As the computer accepted the DataStick as the boot option, I explained to Ed what I was doing. It was obvious he had no idea what I was talking about so we waited in awkward silence for the next few seconds. Finally, the Mint logo appeared on the screen. I opened Dolphin and located the Windows drive then asked him for the name of the file. He couldn’t remember but was sure it was a PDF. A few minutes later, I pulled a pen from my pocket and wrote down the number he needed and slid it back over to him with his laptop. Read more

Leftovers: Proprietary Software and Command Line