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First impressions of Google Earth for Linux

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Google

Only a few weeks after releasing its first Linux application -- the photo editing program, Picasa -- Google has released its second application for Linux: Google Earth for Linux 4.

Fly Your Penguin On Google Earth

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Google

Although Google Earth was impressive on Windows, I never used it because I do all of my work on a Linux laptop. Hearing about the first-time release of Google Earth version 4 beta for Linux, I immediately pounced on the download and started exploring.

More Google the Earth with Linux

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Google

Google has released a version of Google Earth for Linux, at last. The Beta Version 4 has been tested on numerous versions of Linux, including Ubuntu, Suse, Linspire and Red Hat, and is a significant improvement to running Google Earth under Wine.

Google Earth on Linux

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Google
Software
-s

Here's a quick little tour from my 5 minutes of playing with Google Earth for Linux. It's kinda neato, but not as feature complete as the windows version I played with at the U.

Google Earth Linux Beta Available

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Google
Software

Want to know more about a specific location? Dive right in -- Google Earth combines satellite imagery, maps and the power of Google Search to put the world's geographic information at your fingertips. Linux version available.

Review: Google Spreadsheet Beta Doesn't Quite Add Up

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Google

There's a lot of talk around the blogosphere about how Google is starting to challenge Microsoft for primacy in office applications. I use it for simple statistics and as a sort of "database lite" -- I thought I'd give it a try.

Google vs. OO.o, for MS Office spreadsheet replacement

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Google

If you really want a free and good replacement for Microsoft Office, you should be looking to OpenOffice.org, not Google. OK, so it is rather neat that Google is releasing a Web-based spreadsheet, but come on, is it really that big a deal?

Google denies browser plans

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Google

Google Inc. has no plans to build its own Web browser software to compete with rival Microsoft Corp., Chief Executive Eric Schmidt says.

Unleashing Google File System: An Overview

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Google

I found a link to Google File System. Honestly, it didn’t make any sense to me. Where would Google deploy this proprietary file system? Or is Google planning to have an operating system? I decided to have a look at it nonetheless and here’s a quick overview of my findings.

First impressions of Picasa - Google's first rate Graphics suite for Linux

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Google

Today, Google did something which would gladden the hearts of thousands of GNU/Linux users - well atleast those who are not as rigid in outlook about GPL any way. That is they finally released a version ofPicasa for Linux. I downloaded the deb file from the Google's Picasa site since I run Ubuntu as my main GNU/Linux distribution. And the installation went quite smoothly.

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Linux File Manager: Top 20 Reviewed for Linux Users

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Latte Dock, first beta for v0.9 (v0.8.97)

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Games: Evan's Remains, Path of Titans, GIGABUSTER, SpriteStack

Shrinking Linux Attack Surfaces

Often, a kernel developer will try to reduce the size of an attack surface against Linux, even if it can't be closed entirely. It's generally a toss-up whether such a patch makes it into the kernel. Linus Torvalds always prefers security patches that really close a hole, rather than just give attackers a slightly harder time of it. Matthew Garrett recognized that userspace applications might have secret data that might be sitting in RAM at any given time, and that those applications might want to wipe that data clean so no one could look at it. There were various ways to do this already in the kernel, as Matthew pointed out. An application could use mlock() to prevent its memory contents from being pushed into swap, where it might be read more easily by attackers. An application also could use atexit() to cause its memory to be thoroughly overwritten when the application exited, thus leaving no secret data in the general pool of available RAM. The problem, Matthew pointed out, came if an attacker was able to reboot the system at a critical moment—say, before the user's data could be safely overwritten. If attackers then booted into a different OS, they might be able to examine the data still stored in RAM, left over from the previously running Linux system. As Matthew also noted, the existing way to prevent even that was to tell the UEFI firmware to wipe system memory before booting to another OS, but this would dramatically increase the amount of time it took to reboot. And if the good guys had won out over the attackers, forcing them to wait a long time for a reboot could be considered a denial of service attack—or at least downright annoying. Read more