Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

First impressions of Picasa - Google's first rate Graphics suite for Linux

Filed under
Google

Today, Google did something which would gladden the hearts of thousands of GNU/Linux users - well atleast those who are not as rigid in outlook about GPL any way. That is they finally released a version ofPicasa for Linux. I downloaded the deb file from the Google's Picasa site since I run Ubuntu as my main GNU/Linux distribution. And the installation went quite smoothly.

Google Summer of Code 2006: The Contestents Are At The Starting Line!

Filed under
KDE
Google

KDE is happy to announce the selection of 24 student applications for the Google Summer of Code 2006. This year, Google received a total of 6400 applications worldwide spread across 102 different Open Source organisations.

Rough Start For Google's Summer of Code '06

Filed under
Google

They waited in IRC. They waited by their inboxes. They waited for Google to accept them.

And nearly 1,800 applicants of Google's Summer of Code 2006 finally got word their projects were accepted. Then came the rude awakening.

Linux Distributions Trends

Filed under
Google

I am sure that by now all the world has already found out and tested the cool new tool google launched yesterday: google trends… What does this show us? That redhat is going down… Debian is strong and many peoples are still interested into it. Centos? Peoples don’t know to much about this cool project.

Google complains to EC about IE-search link

Filed under
Google

Google said Tuesday that it has complained to the European Commission about the way that Microsoft bundles its own search mechanism in the newest version of Internet Explorer.

Google Summer of Code is underway

Filed under
Google

As of May 1, Google is now accepting applications from students. You've only got until May 8th to get them in, so you'd better get on it.

Google Promotes Firefox Browser On Its Home Page

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF

Mozilla's Firefox is getting promoted on one of the world's most popular Web pages, Google's Google.com home page, as the open-source browser continues its David-vs.-Goliath battle against Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Fedora, Red Hat Learning Community and Kubernetes

  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • Red Hat Learning Community fosters open source tech education and reaches 10k members

    We are pleased to announce that the Red Hat Learning Community has reached more than 10,000 members! Since its launch in September 2018, the community has shown itself to be a valuable hub for those seeking to share knowledge and build their open source skill set. When we first started out, this was just an idea. We set out to support, enable, and motivate new and experienced open source learners as they learn how to work with Red Hat technologies, validate their technical skill sets, build careers and pursue Red Hat Certifications. We soft launched the community in July 2018 and invited 400 Red Hat Training instructors, students, curriculum developers and certifications team members to jump-start community discussion boards and earn a founding member badge.

  • skuba Dives into Open Source Waters

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4, our next major release is now in beta. It has major architectural improvements for our customers. In the process of planning and developing it, we took a close look at bootstrapping clusters and managing node membership, and we listened to our customers. One of the things we heard from many of them was that they wanted a way to deploy multiple clusters efficiently, by scripting the bootstrap process or by integrating it into other management tools they use. To address this, we committed even more strongly to our upstream participation in Kubernetes development. Instead of building SUSE-specific tools as we had in earlier versions, we contributed the efforts of SUSE engineers to the upstream kubeadm component, helping it bridge the gap between its current state and the abilities we had previously implemented in the Velum web interface. Our bootstrap and node management strategy in version 4 is built on kubeadm.

  • Deprecated APIs Removed In 1.16: Here’s What You Need To Know

    As the Kubernetes API evolves, APIs are periodically reorganized or upgraded. When APIs evolve, the old API is deprecated and eventually removed.

PCLinuxOS KDE Darkstar 2019.07 Release

I am pleased to announce the July 2019 release of the PClinuxOS KDE Darkstar is ready for download. Read more

Crostini/Google Update

  • Acer Chromebook R 13

    It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until September 2021.

  • HP Chromebook x360 14

    It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until June 2024.

  • Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 78

    Back in March, I reported on an effort that would enable resizing of the Linux partition for Crostini-supported Chromebooks. At that time, I expected the feature to land in Chrome OS 75. I’ve checked for the feature now that Chrome OS 75 is available (again) and it’s nowhere to be seen. That’s because it was recently pushed back to Chrome OS 78. [...] However, other aspects need to be considered: Storage of large media files, for example, or enabling Google Drive synchronization with the Chrome OS Files app for offline file access. And then there are Android apps, so of which – particularly games – can require one or two gigabytes of space. So far, I haven’t run into any storage issues on my Pixel Slate with 128 GB of data capacity. But it’s easy to see that the Linux container is using up the bulk of my tablet’s storage: As I understand it, /dev/vdb is the Crostini container with Linux, which is 88 GB in size with 58 GB free.

Software: Maestral, GLava and Pitivi

  • Maestral Is A New Open Source Dropbox Client For Linux And macOS

    Maestral is a new open source Dropbox client for macOS and Linux, that's currently in beta. It can be used both with and without a GUI, and it was created with the purpose of having a Dropbox client that supports folder syncing to drives which use filesystems like Btrfs, Ext3, ZFS, XFS or encrypted filesystems, which are no longer supported by Dropbox.

  • GLava – OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for desktop windows or backgrounds

    Over the past few months, I’ve written lots of reviews of open source audio software, focusing mainly on music players. Linux has a mouthwatering array of open source multimedia tools, so I’m going to turn my attention wider afield from music players. Let’s start with some multimedia candy. GLava is an OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for Linux. An audio visualizer works by extracting waveform and/or frequency information from the audio and feeds this information through some display rules, which produces what you see on the screen. The imagery is usually generated and rendered in real time and in a way synchronized with the music as it is played. GLava makes a real-time audio visualizer appear as if it’s embedded in your desktop background, or in a window. When displayed as the background, it’ll display on top of your wallpaper, giving the appearance of a live, animated wallpaper. GLava is a simple C program that sets up the necessary OpenGL and Xlib code for sets of 2D fragment shaders. The software uses PulseAudio to sync the desktop visualizer with any music source.

  • Millan Castro: GSoC: First month working in Pitivi

    Pitivi is a video editor, free and open source. Targeted at newcomers and professional users, it is minimalist and powerful. This summer I am fortunate to collaborate in Pitivi development through Google Summer of Code. My goal is to implement an interval time system, with the support of Mathieu Duponchell, my menthor, and other members of the Pitivi community. An interval time system is a common tool in many video editors. It will introduce new features in Pitivi. The user will be able to set up a range of time in the timeline editor, playback specific parts of the timeline, export the selected parts of the timeline, cut or copy clips inside the interval and zoom in/out the interval. Mi proposal also includes the design of a marker system to store information at a certain time position.