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Not OK, Google: Chromium voice extension pulled after spying concerns

Filed under
Google
Security

Google has removed an extension from Chromium, the open source sibling to the Chrome browser, after accusations that the extension was installed surreptitiously and subsequently eavesdropped on Chromium users.

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A Chromebook replaced the MacBook Pro on my desk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Mac

The Acer Chromebook 13 so impressed me when I reviewed it months ago that I bought one. After using it for months it has replaced the 13-inch MacBook Pro as my daily work system in the office.

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Also: Google was downloading audio listeners onto computers without consent, say Chromium users

When You Use Google.com, You Use Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

It's hard to imagine just how big Google is and what scale it operates, but there is one thing that everyone should know and that it's not all that surprising. Their servers are running a custom OS based on Linux.

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Chromebooks Spread Out, with Acer and Microsoft Responding

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

If you stay tuned to news from U.S. school districts, you'll see that school systems are purchasing Chromebooks at a steady clip. Westwood High School in Massachussetts is buying Chromebooks to issue to students who will return them once they graduate. The Bell-Chatham school board has approved Chromebook purchases for students, as has the Sumner School District.

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Chrome, Debian Linux, and the secret binary blob download riddle

Filed under
Google
Security
Debian

"Anyway, I haven't said that banning such software from Debian would be the only solution... but at least these incidents come far too frequent recently, so apparently something needs to be done at Debian level to pro-actively prevent future cases/compromises like this."

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First impressions of Chromixium OS 1.0

Filed under
Google
Reviews

My point is that people who are likely to enjoy Chromebooks and use their computers almost solely for accessing the web will probably find Chromixium quite useful. However, while it is technically possible to access more features and off-line software through Chromixium's application menu, the process is slow and awkward when compared with other desktop Linux distributions. Granted, Chromixium is still in its early stages, it just hit version 1.0, so the standalone features will probably improve in time. For now, I think Chromixium offers an interesting web-focused environment with the fallback option of using locally installed applications. The implementation has some rough edges at the moment, but I suspect it will get better in future releases.

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Google will now help you decide which Android handset is right for you

Filed under
Android
Google

Ever wondered which Android phone may be right for you? With so many to choose from, knowing which suits your needs can be tricky.

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Also: Google’s new tool helps you pick an Android phone

Google Adds Android Phone Suggestion Tool To The Official Android Homepage

Google has a beautiful new website designed to help you choose the perfect Android phone

Filed under
Android
Google

One of the best things about Android phones is that you have options. However, many Android phones these days seem to have similar specifications and it can be difficult to actually figure out which one is best for you.

To remedy this conundrum, Google has released a nifty new website that helps you decide which Android phone you should get if you're up for an upgrade or simply looking around.

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More in Tux Machines

Black Lab Brings Real-Time Kernel Patching to Its Enterprise Desktop 8 Linux OS

A few moments ago, Softpedia has been informed by Black Lab Software about the general availability of the sixth DP (Developer Preview) build of the upcoming Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 OS. Sporting a new kernel from the Linux kernel from the 4.2 series, Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 Developer Preview 6 arrives today for early adopters and public beta testers with real-time kernel patching, which means that you won't have to reboot your Black Lab Linux Enterprise OS after kernel upgrades. "DP6 offers you a window into what's new and whats coming when Black Lab Enterprise Desktop and Black Lab Enterprise Desktop for Education is released. As with our other developer previews it also aids in porting your applications to the new environment," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO, Black Lab Software. Read more

USB stick brings neural computing functions to devices

Movidius unveiled a “Fathom” USB stick and software framework for integrating accelerated neural networking processing into embedded and mobile devices. On April 28, Movidius announced availability of the USB-interfaced “Fathom Neural Compute Stick,” along with an underlying Fathom deep learning software framework. The device is billed as “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator,” capable of allowing “powerful neural networks to be moved out of the cloud, and deployed natively in end-user devices.” Read more

ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

  • Open Source ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk
    ImageMagick, an open source suite of tools for working with graphic images used by a large number of websites, has been found to contain a serious security vulnerability that puts sites using the software at risk for malicious code to be executed onsite. Security experts consider exploitation to be so easy they’re calling it “trivial,” and exploits are already circulating in the wild. The biggest risk is to sites that allows users to upload their own image files. Information about the vulnerability was made public Tuesday afternoon by Ryan Huber, a developer and security researcher, who wrote that he had little choice but to post about the exploit.
  • Huge number of sites imperiled by critical image-processing vulnerability
    A large number of websites are vulnerable to a simple attack that allows hackers to execute malicious code hidden inside booby-trapped images. The vulnerability resides in ImageMagick, a widely used image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other languages. Many social media and blogging sites, as well as a large number of content management systems, directly or indirectly rely on ImageMagick-based processing so they can resize images uploaded by end users.
  • Extreme photo-bombing: Bad ImageMagick bug puts countless websites at risk of hijacking
    A wildly popular software tool used by websites to process people's photos can be exploited to execute malicious code on servers and leak server-side files. Security bugs in the software are apparently being exploited in the wild right now to compromise at-risk systems. Patches to address the vulnerabilities are available in the latest source code – but are incomplete and have not been officially released, we're told.

Canonical to Offer Snappy Ubuntu 16 Images for Raspberry Pi 2, DragonBoard 410c

As you may know (or not), the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) is taking place these days, between May 3 and May 5, on the Ubuntu On Air channel, where the Ubuntu devs are laying down plans for the future. We've already reported the other day that the next major release of the popular Linux kernel-based operating system, Ubuntu 16.10, which has been dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as Yakkety Yak, won't ship with the long-anticipated Unity 8 desktop interface as the default session. Read more